Trim 9mm Brass?


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TenDriver
April 26, 2014, 07:59 PM
I don't trim straight wall pistol brass, but saw today in Lyman #49 where they say you should trim 9mm since it head spaces off the mouth.

Anyone do this?

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Vodoun da Vinci
April 26, 2014, 08:19 PM
I'm a relative newbie with 9mm and have some cases that have been reloaded 5X now. They have not grown and do not need trimmed. So, no, I don't/have never trimmed 9mm brass.

VooDoo

fallout mike
April 26, 2014, 08:21 PM
Nope

M1key
April 26, 2014, 08:31 PM
I measure them before loading and toss ones that are worn out or too long. I would never bother to trim them simply because I have buckets of brass.

M

rcmodel
April 26, 2014, 08:34 PM
Not in 50 years I haven't.

I trim Magnum revolver brass to get consistent crimps.

Never trimmed an auto-pistol case in my life.

Because it simply isn't necessary.

rc

loose noose
April 26, 2014, 08:39 PM
No, I don't trim pistol brass that is designed for a semi-auto.

BYJO4
April 26, 2014, 08:40 PM
It's not necessary to trim 9MM. If you want to and have the time, go ahead as it can't hurt anything.

Gadawg88
April 26, 2014, 08:42 PM
Nope

Otto
April 26, 2014, 08:47 PM
.... saw today in Lyman #49 where they say you should trim 9mm since it head spaces off the mouth.

Lyman does not say that you should trim 9mm brass. It says cases trimmed should be uniformed and accurate because it head spaces off the mouth.

sappyg
April 26, 2014, 08:53 PM
I trim mine only because they could wind up in a glock. Haven't been willing to take a chance on a long or fat round firing out of battery.

Any thoughts on specically loading 9mm for Glocks?

rcmodel
April 26, 2014, 08:56 PM
No.

In spec 9mm is 9mm.

If it's safe to fire in any gun, it's safe to fire in a Glock too.

rc

RussellC
April 26, 2014, 09:43 PM
No.

In spec 9mm is 9mm.

If it's safe to fire in any gun, it's safe to fire in a Glock too.

rc
I have reloaded a ton of 9mm rounds for Glocks, dont trim it, no problems....headspacing off case mouth notwithstanding......

Russellc

Blue68f100
April 26, 2014, 10:42 PM
No, never have in nearly 40 yrs.

jmorris
April 26, 2014, 10:50 PM
Nope, and have shot well over 100,000 of them through Glocks alone.

oldreloader
April 26, 2014, 11:44 PM
Mine shrink instead of grow

gamestalker
April 26, 2014, 11:58 PM
Of all the reloaders I know, and I do know a good few, I'm probably the only one who trims everything I load.

As for whether or not they stretch, with my loads, at the pressures I work around, yes they do grow, and so much so, that I often find them to be more than .010" beyond SAAMI max after the first firing. This is with 9mm and .40 though and wheel gun brass.

GS

ArchAngelCD
April 27, 2014, 12:18 AM
In reality most times straight walled pistol brass will shrink slightly when shot and reloaded.

TenDriver
April 27, 2014, 04:24 AM
Lyman does not say that you should trim 9mm brass. It says cases trimmed should be uniformed and accurate because it head spaces off the mouth.


You're correct. I misread that.

Mwaves
April 27, 2014, 04:04 PM
No need to trim. I asked the same question when I started reloading 9mm. Everyone basically said the same as here. Now I just toss them out if I find a long one.

gamestalker
April 27, 2014, 06:27 PM
Mwaves, why toss a long one out vs just trimming it? It's still a good piece of brass.

GS

hostjunkies
April 27, 2014, 07:44 PM
No trim. Shoot until they split.

tightgroup tiger
April 27, 2014, 09:14 PM
I have never seen a 9mm that was over maximum length to begin with.
No, I don't trim them. I do pick out anything under .740"in length.
I use the short ones for shooting in places where I don't get the cases back or for chump giveaways.

joneb
April 28, 2014, 01:24 AM
I do to make 9x18, I try to recover it all......;)if you are loading free range brass it would be good to check the length.

Kurastduuks
April 28, 2014, 01:44 AM
Only handgun brass I trim is magnum loads or target revolver ammo. Never had a need to in 9mm

gamestalker
April 28, 2014, 03:43 AM
Aside from the debate of whether they do, or don't stretch, I have always felt that keeping handgun brass trimmed to the same lengths helps to eliminate issues with inconsistent crimps.

Like many, I have a source for positively once fired factory brass. Often I will find a good deal that is over the SAAMI max, or very close to max, but rarely do I come across anything shorter than SAAMI minimum. And those pieces that I trim to SAAMI trim too length, they have always stretched several thousandths on the first or second time reloaded, but little if any change beyond that point.

Like I said earlier though, this is with the loads I shoot, and from the firearms I shoot them through. Which is to say, I load and shoot mostly high pressure Longshot loads worked up to no less than published maximum. I also don't crimp my cartridges at all, I don't bell the case mouths, and I only load with jacketed bullets, if it matters.

GS

UziLand
April 28, 2014, 11:31 AM
The only time I trim 9mm brass (and it's a royal PIA) is for frangibles. This is because the crimp is so critical. If you over crimp you can fracture the bullet and not notice it. I would rather trim than take the chance of firing a fractured round. You all know how ugly that could be:banghead:

UL

jwrowland77
April 28, 2014, 11:58 AM
Nope, I never trim for semi-auto pistol brass. I load for 9mm, 45acp and .380acp.

The only handgun brass I trim is .357 mag and 38 special just in order to get a consistent crimp.

Potatohead
April 28, 2014, 01:28 PM
Believe this one may be falling into the asked and answered category. Tis rare to see such agreement around these parts.

HisStigness
April 28, 2014, 01:36 PM
Am I the only one that has found 9mm brass that was longer than .754?

Fredo0621
April 28, 2014, 01:36 PM
You will always lose them before needing to be trimmed.

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