Uberti 1876 Centennial, which calibre?


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andym79
May 2, 2014, 06:36 PM
Hi guys,

for a little while now I have fancied getting a Uberti 1876!

Something about the 50 calibre version is really appealing (a 50 cal lever :))

However I am not sure how practical it would be versus the two 45 cal options, with the 50 cal I think I might be forced into casting my own!

Does anyone know if the 50-95 is a .508 or .511"?

Let me know which one you would buy and why:

45-60
45-75
50-95

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CraigC
May 2, 2014, 11:55 PM
The .50-95 is the one that appeals to me as well. I still plan to get one, eventually. From what I remember in researching the subject, it needs .511-.512" bullets in the 300gr range and those are not easy to find. Montana Bullet Works had some promising offerings but they're no longer in operation. Perhaps Buffalo Arms has something. Seem to recall that the easiest way to procure brass was to form from Starline .50Alaskan. I have no idea what you have available in Australia.

The .45-60 is the easiest to load for, simply trimming .45/70 cases. Seems like the .45/75 is the most challenging, case-wise (.50AK?) but bullets are obviously easier.

Everybody has a .45-70.

eastbank
May 3, 2014, 03:59 AM
i own and shoot a 1883 win 76 in 45-60 with a special order longer barrel(i didn,t know that when i bought it) and it is easy to load for. but its damn heavy,over 11 lbs loaded full up. i have heard horror stories about the italian repo,s and would have to try one out before buying one. eastbank.

yzguy87
May 3, 2014, 06:48 AM
I have no experience with 45-60,45-75 or 50-95 so I can't help you there but I noticed there's no option for 45-70. Would you just get another gun or see if they can make you an 1876 Centenial chambered for 45-70?

CraigC
May 3, 2014, 09:17 AM
I forgot to mention that, the Chaparrals are a crapshoot at best. I haven't heard any of the horror stories associated with the Uberti version.

The 1876 is incompatible with the .45/70, it's too long. Not just the case but those very long 500gr bullets that they were originally loaded with. So it would have to be a different rifle in that chambering.

andym79
May 3, 2014, 06:13 PM
I was thinking if it would be too much hassle probably just a marlin in 45-70!

The 45-60 seems the most practical to reload for being a shortened 45-70 and loosing a bit of power from the 45-70 wouldn't be a big thing.

But a 50 cal lever :)

Float Pilot
May 4, 2014, 02:11 PM
I had a Chaparral in 45-75 for awhile. It was junk.
That cartridge is a big pain in the butt to load.

I like the 1876 rifles from an interest standpoint, but I also like to shoot. So I would go with a 45-60 from that platform.

By the by, I have fired a 50-95 in a real antique Winchester. Horribly inaccurate and unpleasant to shoot.


http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=85749&d=1223066614

CraigC
May 4, 2014, 04:44 PM
I can't imagine the .50-95 in a 10lb 1876 to be less pleasant to shoot than a 7lb Marlin shooting heavy loads.

Tommygunn
May 4, 2014, 06:19 PM
I had a Chaparral in 45-75 for awhile. It was junk.
That cartridge is a big pain in the butt to load.

I like the 1876 rifles from an interest standpoint, but I also like to shoot. So I would go with a 45-60 from that platform.

By the by, I have fired a 50-95 in a real antique Winchester. Horribly inaccurate and unpleasant to shoot.


http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=85749&d=1223066614
Float Pilot, I wonder if you could expand a bit on what was wrong with the Winchester '76 Chaparrel you had?

BigG
May 4, 2014, 08:23 PM
45-60 would be the best choice for a 1876 replica. The action is not strong enough for some of the more powerful chamberings. That's why John Browning made the 1886 type action for Winchester to get the heavy bullet hard hitting calibers into repeating rifles.

Float Pilot
May 5, 2014, 12:14 AM
I can't imagine the .50-95 in a 10lb 1876 to be less pleasant to shoot than a 7lb Marlin shooting heavy loads.

The difference being that the crescent metal buttplate of the old 50-95 1876, along with the overall design of the stock angle made it a touch odd to shoot the 20 rounds I was allowed. It was a taper barrel model with a half magazine. I cannot figure out why someone would order a light weight ( comparatively speaking) rifle and not order a flat shotgun butt.

And yes I do not like shooting hot Buffalo Bore loads through a Marlin Guide gun either. Even with the more modern design and recoil pad. In fact I do not like the modern Marlins and prefer a Winchester 1886 design. With medium loads. I have nothing to prove and a Bear will never know the difference within 100 yards.


I wonder if you could expand a bit on what was wrong with the Winchester '76 Chaparrel you had?

The wood was junk with what looked like a painted on or pressed on veneer. The metal work inside was horrible and it took lots or work to get it to feed correctly most of the time. I would rather have a Uberti or the real thing.

Deog
May 5, 2014, 01:50 AM
45/70 of course

CraigC
May 5, 2014, 12:45 PM
If you shoulder a crescent butt correctly, it should not be a problem. The butt doesn't go into the pocket of the shoulder like any other would but further out on the top of the arm.

I would definitely avoid the Chaparral version. They had serious QC issues and that beautiful wood grain you see.....it's painted on.

Axel Larson
May 5, 2014, 02:24 PM
I chose 45-70 because it would be much easier to get parts for reloading.

eastbank
May 5, 2014, 02:59 PM
my win 1876 made in 1883 in 45.60 with a 30 inch barrel is a joy to shoot with a .457 sized 300gr soft lead bullet with 27grs imr 4198 with no filler. with a fine sight picture it shoots 4 " high at 50yds and just about dead on at a hundred yds. it is a very heavy rifle. i bought it at public auction with not too many other bidders bidding on it and got it at a very good price, over all it is in very good condition with a next to mint bore. i fired several hundred rounds thru it with out any problems. eastbank.

andym79
May 6, 2014, 06:22 AM
CraigC If you shoulder a crescent butt correctly, it should not be a problem. The butt doesn't go into the pocket of the shoulder like any other would but further out on the top of the arm.

Yes I figured this out the hard way after a couple of sixty shot matches with my 30-30 which has a metal crescent buttplate. With incorrectly placement and moderate loads the 30-30 started to hurt half way through, but once moved I hardly even noticed the recoil!

I figured that the crescent butt plates where a useful factor in maintain stock placement consistency!

Very nice eastbank, I am surprised there was much competition to get that!

Searcher4851
May 14, 2014, 04:25 PM
I voted for the 45-70 simply because components are readily available. (also because I have several other rifles chambered in that cartridge)
It's a great cartridge, and has the ability to take down any game you may run across. It can also be loaded down to a really fun plinking cartridge.

If you enjoyed reading about "Uberti 1876 Centennial, which calibre?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!