Bayonet hardness/temper..?


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Shanghai McCoy
May 8, 2014, 09:04 PM
What do you figure are the hardness specs on old US bayonets ? I figure not too hard as that would be brittle beyond usefulness as a bayonet. :scrutiny:

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Ron James
May 8, 2014, 09:46 PM
Don't know, but I do know that years ago I tried sharping one for a fellow, ( M-16 ) and it was one of the hardest steels I have ever worked with.

Sam Cade
May 8, 2014, 09:48 PM
Pretty soft. Figure high 40s to mid 50s.

Sam Cade
May 8, 2014, 09:52 PM
Don't know, but I do know that years ago I tried sharping one for a fellow, ( M-16 ) and it was one of the hardest steels I have ever worked with.

Ontario's spec for the M7 is 54-56.
For the stainless M9 53-57.

Shanghai McCoy
May 8, 2014, 10:09 PM
Thanks Sam. My "google fu" at work gets limited by the "net nanny" but I figured you would be the first to answer up. Much obliged.
These are M7 carbon steel blades. No marks on the blades and the fittings had all been removed but they are, probably, Ontario made. Now, what to do with them..? :scrutiny:
;)

Sam Cade
May 8, 2014, 10:55 PM
Now, what to do with them..? :scrutiny:
;)

Stacked leather washer handled daggers of course. :cool:

I think rc has done a couple like that.

Alternatively, maybe get all Raggedy Man Rockatansky and weld on a length of thick walled pipe as a handle and wield it as a post-apocalyptic poniard if you find yourself rolling around in the overgrown highway verge with a sheet metal armored, wheelbarrow pushing, raider.

hso
May 8, 2014, 11:08 PM
"Old" bayonet? Dunno, but it isn't difficult to take it where it can get tested if you have a university around.

Old bayonets often made awful knives since they had to withstand impact, but didn't have to cut. Lots of toughness.

For an entertaining short read - http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A847532

Ron James
May 9, 2014, 12:57 AM
:) Well, don't know who was furnishing the steel in 1966, but that bayonet was still one of the hardest pieces of steel I've worked with. I was the go to guy for knifes. More than once I would find a couple of knifes on my bunk when I came in at night, no ideal of who they belonged too. Few days later someone would look me up and asked me about such and such knife ( they had better have a bottle of VO under their arm ). I even had SF guys dropping off knifes . I never could understand it, something as simple as sharping a knife was a mystery to so many people, to so many it was akin to black magic.:)

Shanghai McCoy
May 9, 2014, 01:03 AM
Stacked leather handle daggers might be a good idea for the better blades. I've seen pictures of one that rc did, very cool. A couple are pretty beat up from bad sharpening so I might see if I can regrind them into some small seax knives ?
Got to start lining up a few post retirement projects here for after August... ;)

Shanghai McCoy
May 9, 2014, 01:07 AM
Ron,
I know what you mean. My boss brings his kitchen knives in for me to sharpen for him. :rolleyes:

Sam Cade
May 9, 2014, 01:10 AM
post retirement projects here for after August... ;)

Whaaaaat? :eek:

Congratulations!


I thought you were my age (early 30's) for some reason.

hso
May 9, 2014, 01:15 AM
Young at heart doesn't mean the heart is young!

Sam Cade
May 9, 2014, 01:18 AM
Young at heart doesn't mean the heart is young!

Fret not.
There are always transplants.

;)

Shanghai McCoy
May 9, 2014, 09:31 AM
Whaaaaat? :eek:

Congratulations!


I thought you were my age (early 30's) for some reason.
Well Thanks Sam.
Like the song says, "I grow older but not up."

:D

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