So it takes me about 2hrs to load


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gonoles_1980
May 9, 2014, 11:40 PM
100 bullets with my single stage press, it takes me about 30 minutes to shoot a hundred bullets. The math ain't working out.

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Boho
May 9, 2014, 11:51 PM
Yeah it just don't seem fair! Bought a progressive press and turned those times around.

geim druth
May 9, 2014, 11:52 PM
It takes me an hour to drive to the range and an hour to drive home again so half an hour of shooting is all gravy.

Gtscotty
May 9, 2014, 11:53 PM
That's exactly why I upgraded to a progressive. Yesterday I loaded 100 .40s in 18 minutes, a leisurely pace for some folks, but fast enough to make my math work out right.

ColtPythonElite
May 9, 2014, 11:59 PM
I loaded single stage for 20 years before going progressive. I regret all the time I wasted.

FastCut
May 10, 2014, 12:14 AM
Python I'm feeling you....I used a Single Stage RCBS for years and when I started shooting AR's I purchased a Dillon 550 and felt like kicking myself for all the long nights I used to put in making ammo. I still use the RC press but it mostly holds my Dillon 1200 trim motor which is another tool you shouldn't be without if you process rifle brass on you progressive. I can cut about 400-500 brass easily and perfectly so fast it makes me laugh when I think of cranking the handle on my old trimming tool for hours. I understand people have financial limitations which is why I didn't make the plunge for so long but now I can process 1000 5.56 in a weekend and still have time to get the other things I need to do done. My progressive processed ammo is just as good or better than my single stage. Single stage will always have a place on my bench but I use it much less than I used to since its so easy to just pull a quick change toolhead off its holder, slide it into the Dillon, set up the shell plate and I am in business in 15 minutes for the whole change over.

mljdeckard
May 10, 2014, 12:20 AM
I still consider myself a rookie, so I don't mind taking a long time. I might upgrade to a turret press eventually.

WestKentucky
May 10, 2014, 12:32 AM
I'm at 75/hr all on single stage, but that's in batches if 1000 or more. Run all through a stage, then run all through next stage until all are complete.

km101
May 10, 2014, 12:33 AM
Dillon Precision Products
8009 E. Dillon's Way
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

800-223-4570

They will cure your problems.

medalguy
May 10, 2014, 12:35 AM
WestKentucky, get a Dillon and you can get 800 an hour. Some report more. :)

cfullgraf
May 10, 2014, 12:41 AM
For batches of ammunition around 100-150 rounds, I really do not see any time saving, lights on to lights off, between the progressive and singe stage presses. But, I rarely load the same cartridge on the progressive two sessions in a row. I am constantly setting up the press and powder measure.

Of course, for large batches, there is no contest.

But then I enjoy reloading and spend time in the reloading room many evenings a week.

WestKentucky
May 10, 2014, 12:50 AM
I grew up on a .256winmag lee loader being preached to inspect after each step. I tried a progressive shotgun loader and truly despised it. I will keep my rockchucker mounted next to my challenger.

ColtPythonElite
May 10, 2014, 12:52 AM
WestKentucky, get a Dillon and you can get 800 an hour. Some report more. :)
That sure is fast.

MI2600
May 10, 2014, 01:02 AM
I've reloaded 20-25 different calibers with a single stage for over 30 years. I'm in no hurry...it helps the winter pass and I don't have to watch reality crud on TV.

Drop45
May 10, 2014, 01:16 AM
Started off on a RCBS a year and a half ago then moved up to a Redding T-7 turret press. Now within the past month I've bought 2 xl-650's. One xl for .45acp the other for 9mm. Still use the Redding for .357 and .44mag though since I only load up 100 or so at a time. And the RCBS is used for 454 cassul also no more than 100 at a time. So I guess they all have a purpose. But the Dillons are sweet though.

TooManyToys
May 10, 2014, 02:21 AM
Many people feel the Lee Classic cast Turret press with the mounted powder feeder & primer feeder is the perfect compromise between a single and full progressive.
And for under $200 its a pretty sweet deal too.

jcwit
May 10, 2014, 07:01 AM
Being as I have thousands upon thousands of 9mm brass that I have picked up over the years with all of already deprimed. sized, and tumbled/polished I normally do not count case prep time as time spent reloading.

Priming cases for reloading is usually spent while watching a show on TV, so that doesn't count as time either.

Actual time spent charging cases and bullet insertion is very little, can easily do a few hundred an hour in a rush, but usually only do 100 to 150 an hour as I like to work at a leisurely pace.

This is how I just enjoy doing it, with 2 single stage presses side by side, one with a Lee Auto Disk mounted, and the other with the seating die mounted.

No reason to rush when smelling the roses.

tightgroup tiger
May 10, 2014, 07:49 AM
The math ain't working out.

No, it doesn't for me either. I had gone back to single staging my .357mags and was shooting around 100 rounds a week.
OH LORD.

I resurrected my old pro1000, dismantled it and put it back together. As long as I don't prime on it the darn thing is working pretty well. I had retired it to de-priming duties which it worked supreme for but I believe I am going to have to do something this year. I now have 3 pistol calibers I single staging due to lack of equipment. My LNL-AP is set up for 9mm and will stay that way.
I believe I will be buying a second LNL-AP with out a case feeder for all my other pistol calibers and leave my single stage for rifle and loading run cleanups (like pulling bullets and such).
I have a bad habit of leaving my 9mm loading go until I have around 2k that need loaded but I know my 9mm machine will handle that in a few hours and I'm good to go for a while again. That works for me.
The .357s, .327s, and 41mags are work in progress all the time whether I have the time or not. That has to change.

When you get your first progressive you'll go from being a slave to the single stage to "what the hell just happened?" I'm done already?

It's a beautiful thing.

Potatohead
May 10, 2014, 08:23 AM
I like to drag it out. So i think i'll keep my LCT.

Peter M. Eick
May 10, 2014, 09:35 AM
I find that with my Pro2000 if I am not really pushing it, I can load at about the rate I shoot. So I can load up and box up and log in a 1000 rounds in about 3 hours which is close to my burn rate so it all works out.

The key is to spend time on the single stage and work out the loads you want to production.

FROGO207
May 10, 2014, 09:59 AM
Cold mid winter nights and inclement weather spring and fall give me a chance to load more than I shoot all summer as it is.:cool: All precision loaded ammo on a SS press or two FWIW. I also have a metric butt load of processed brass that only needs a primer and then load em up as needed. when I get the urge. When I get into the zone 200-300 finished rounds an hour is not uncommon as the prep is what takes the time to me. I am presently using brass that was prepped 2+ years ago and put into ZipLoc bags after a tumble in Nufinish and look like I cleaned/sized them yesterday.

The key is having enough brass on hand that you can have a years normal use processed ahead so there are no holdups to get to reloading. If you plan ahead I find there are few problems loading what some here would call the slow way.:D YMMV

Blue68f100
May 10, 2014, 10:09 AM
That is why we moved up to a progressive and AP in my case (LNL-AP). Output in the 500-600/hr makes short work out of a daunting process. A lot easier on the tennis elbow too.

gonoles_1980
May 10, 2014, 10:12 AM
I don't mind the time it takes, it's therapeutic. One day I may break down and get a progressive after I retire when I'll probably shoot more often than I do now.

Walkalong
May 10, 2014, 10:14 AM
I had that same problem soon after starting, so I moved to a used Lee Turret press, then started saving my pennies for a progressive.

rclark
May 10, 2014, 10:27 AM
I don't mind the time it takes either. Not a race to see how many I can spit out an hour or how fast I can shoot.... Of course, I do not shoot semi-autos except a bit of .22LR once in awhile. For the most part my shooting is all single action, so don't go through enough that the single stage press and hand priming is a problem and worry about getting behind.... Get a Old Army or other cap/ball revolver and then you don't worry ever again ;) . About time to get one of mine out again for some smoky fun!

Wreck-n-Crew
May 10, 2014, 10:29 AM
Nothing wrong with starting out on a single stage and upgrading later, IMO you did it tight. Just keep the single stage when you do upgrade.

In the meantime there are things to speed up some of the stages (if you haven't already)....what kind of press do you have? I made a case ejector on mine and it really helped when depriming/resizing, flaring. Knocks them right off into a bin and frees my one hand up for just inserting a casing. Do you still hand prime or use some version of auto-prime?

I could load 100-150 an hour on the single stage in large batches.

RunninLate
May 10, 2014, 10:42 AM
I was thinking about a Dillon when I got back into reloading but only shooting a couple hundred rounds every couple of weeks did not make much sense.

When I get a much of brass in I will tumble it, the separate the calibers and deprime/resize the brass. I have a few 1000 cases/calibers in tubs at this state. When I am ready to start loading, I will use a RCBS hand primer to start the process.

Yes it take an hour to reload a couple hundred rounds but I do not mind it.

gonoles_1980
May 10, 2014, 10:44 AM
Wreck-n-Crew, I pre deprime my brass as part of my cleaning process. I'll clean the brass, then lube it, deprime and size, then clean again. I even measure the the brass and sort into two bins. Sometimes I'll hand prime the night before, but the two hours includes the hand priming.

The one area I could speed up is loading the powder, If I could figure out how to put my powder dispenser above the press, I could just dump the powder directly into the funnel on my flare and powder dispenser die. Now I use the the pan from my Lee Scale to dispense the powder into the pan, and then dump into the funnel. But that would probably only save me 5-10 minutes.

It does take me time to calibrate my scale, I use the Layman scale weights. And then getting the powder dispenser to dispense the right amount of powder.

The other areas that take up time are getting the bullet seating die adjusted just right.

Fatelvis
May 10, 2014, 10:45 AM
Me, I enjoy reloading as much as shooting. So when I run out of ammo, my "other" hobby kicks in!

Vodoun da Vinci
May 10, 2014, 11:17 AM
Me, I enjoy reloading as much as shooting. So when I run out of ammo, my "other" hobby kicks in!

Yeah I kind of agree. I'm doing the same - knocked out 100 rounds of Super Dooper VooDoo .38 Special food for my Wife's Ruger LCR. Now that she has dialed in her 2 favorites (Glock 42 and Ruger LCR .38) she gobbles up ammo and grins like a maniac. Gotta get a pix of her with holding a target with the middle eaten out of of and a "sad face" while pointing at an empty range ammo box. :banghead:

I really enjoy loading one at a time and the accuracy and ability to obsess on rolling them "one at a time" but with both of us shooting 2X a month now I cannot keep up. :(

Shooting 800 rounds a month between the two of us in .32, .380, 9mm, .38, and .357 @ roughly 2 hours per 100 requires me to find 16 hours a month to make ammo...that's 4 hours a week. I'm still finding it maybe 1/2 an hour at a stretch but it's getting tight/frantic. I may need to go to progressive to keep up.

VooDoo

rsrocket1
May 10, 2014, 11:31 AM
Get a muzzleloader. The time it takes you to load is the rate at which you shoot. ;)
I like to load in lots of short spurts. 15 minutes in the garage with my LnL AP or Mec 9000 for 100 rounds and over time, it really builds up.

GBExpat
May 10, 2014, 11:31 AM
I count myself as part of the Reloading is Relaxing crew ... actually, now that I have gotten older, I think that I enjoy it as much as shooting. :)

EDIT: I am still exclusively using my 1974 RCBS JR3 Single Stage press.

km101
May 10, 2014, 11:56 AM
I use both a single stage (RC) and two progressives. They each have their uses and good points. If I am loading rifle rounds and want to weigh each charge, I use my Rock Chucker. I does the job well and I don't normally load a large quantity of rounds for each rifle.

For my handgun rounds I use the progressives and crank out all that I want to shoot or store in a efficient way. I have 3 kids that shoot and 4 grandkids that shoot so I have to have a progressive to keep up with the demand if I want to have anything to shoot.

The bottom line is, you have to use the equipment that works best for your situation.
Anything else defeats the purpose, which is having fun and enjoying your hobby!

Analogkid
May 10, 2014, 01:49 PM
I can get 100 out in 1.5 hrs with the lee loader whack a mole set..

On a side note I bet I can drive a 16 penny common nail in oak with one smack now..

Blue68f100
May 10, 2014, 02:07 PM
Yeah I kind of agree. I'm doing the same - knocked out 100 rounds of Super Dooper VooDoo .38 Special food for my Wife's Ruger LCR. Now that she has dialed in her 2 favorites (Glock 42 and Ruger LCR .38) she gobbles up ammo and grins like a maniac. Gotta get a pix of her with holding a target with the middle eaten out of of and a "sad face" while pointing at an empty range ammo box. :banghead:

I really enjoy loading one at a time and the accuracy and ability to obsess on rolling them "one at a time" but with both of us shooting 2X a month now I cannot keep up. :(

Shooting 800 rounds a month between the two of us in .32, .380, 9mm, .38, and .357 @ roughly 2 hours per 100 requires me to find 16 hours a month to make ammo...that's 4 hours a week. I'm still finding it maybe 1/2 an hour at a stretch but it's getting tight/frantic. I may need to go to progressive to keep up.

VooDoo
Yes, As your usage goes up you will be required to upgrade to a progressive in order to keep up. As long as I was shooting a revolver a SS was fine. Once I moved up to simi-auto it was taking all my free time. And since I have a tennis elbow I had to limit my time. I ended up the Hornady LNL-AP almost 6yrs ago. It has been a very reliable press. I did add the brass feeder when I was limited to 1 hand due to a broken wrist. After use the brass feeder I asked my self why I waited so long.

The down side of a progressive is feeding it. You go through a lot of supplies in a short time. But it gives you your free time back. When you can set down and produce 500/600 in 1hr it does not take long to build up your inventory.

WestKentucky
May 10, 2014, 02:54 PM
Analog kid...want to try it with a 44mag set...not so much fun.

Sam1911
May 10, 2014, 03:11 PM
Sheesh. I loaded on a single-stage for a few years, but no way I could deal with the time investment now. To be able to walk into the reloading area and walk out 5 minutes later with a week's practice ammo in hand is precious. Or to take a Saturday and make up a few month's worth? I've got a job, kids, club duties, and plenty of other hobbies. I don't need to kill the hours by sitting in front of a single-stage reloading press.

jmorris
May 10, 2014, 03:22 PM
So it takes me about 2hrs to load
100 bullets with my single stage press, it takes me about 30 minutes to shoot a hundred bullets. The math ain't working out.


It's not your math, it's your method. Takes me 2.5-5 minutes to load 100 rounds, the only math problem with that, is that the negative impact on the wallet.

RussellC
May 10, 2014, 06:18 PM
I like to drag it out. So i think i'll keep my LCT.
Same here, the LCT press is a good inexpensive compromise for me. I can blast out 2 or 300, but I dont "load when I need it" I process brass in spare time, decapping, cleaning trimming (if 5.56) resizing and reprimed. Then I usually have a pile thats deprimed and waiting to be cleaned, and a larger pile of unprocessed. This way If I need to load a particular caliber, all I need to do is charge, seat bullet, crimp (if required). This, and I keep plenty loaded up ready to go. By just processing a little in advance I'm good to go. At the range, I will generally go through 200-300 rounds.

That said, If speed is what you need, go progressive

Bush Pilot
May 10, 2014, 08:52 PM
I can get 100 out in 1.5 hrs with the lee loader whack a mole set..

On a side note I bet I can drive a 16 penny common nail in oak with one smack now..
An automatic case feeder would really speed up your production rate.

Dudemeister
May 11, 2014, 01:29 AM
While some are going from a single stage to a turret or a progressive, I've gone the other way. I'm now doing all my loading on a Lee Handloading press.

I find the process strangely therapeutic, and don't mind the time it takes. I usually do it in stages, one night I deprime/resize all the brass, another evening I re-prime and bell the the mouth, all this while I usually watch something on TV.

Then I set an evening aside for the final stage, dropping the powder and seating the bullets.

I usually do about 1000 rounds like that, sometimes all the same caliber, at other times a couple of different calibers. It seems to work for me.

stubbicatt
May 11, 2014, 06:50 AM
If you do decide to buy a progressive, the Dillon 1050 is the only such press I've used that I would buy again. I tried Lee Loadmaster, I tried Hornady (ne Pacific), and found these two presses to be rather finicky.

Personally, I think the Dillon powder measures with the micrometer adjustable charge bar to be an amazing device, and the only powder measure I would choose to use on a progressive of whatever flavor.

CraigC
May 11, 2014, 10:16 AM
Sheesh. I loaded on a single-stage for a few years, but no way I could deal with the time investment now. To be able to walk into the reloading area and walk out 5 minutes later with a week's practice ammo in hand is precious. Or to take a Saturday and make up a few month's worth? I've got a job, kids, club duties, and plenty of other hobbies. I don't need to kill the hours by sitting in front of a single-stage reloading press.
That's where I'm at with it. Plenty of other stuff to do without killing hours and hours at the loading bench. For one thing, I'd rather be shooting than loading. Looking forward to doing all my volume loading on Dillons and only use the turret for development or small batches.

floydster
May 11, 2014, 11:07 AM
jcwit has to right--it's not about "time" it's about "enjoyment.

FROGO207
May 11, 2014, 11:53 AM
Yeah it is about the enjoyment of it all. I have come to the conclusion that I mostly shoot to reload. Always searching for that one hole group.:cool: AND the longer it takes me to reload a batch the less components I use up in the long run. A win-win if you ask me.:D

gonoles_1980
May 11, 2014, 12:08 PM
If I had many years of work left, I think I'd be more worried about time. Since I plan on retiring in a few years, I think the single stage press will be good. That and I can finally get back into making my own beer again.

Pilot
May 11, 2014, 12:13 PM
I still use a single stage press, and will probably get a progressive at some point in the not too distant future. It certainly does speed up the process.

tightgroup tiger
May 11, 2014, 12:20 PM
Sheesh. I loaded on a single-stage for a few years, but no way I could deal with the time investment now. To be able to walk into the reloading area and walk out 5 minutes later with a week's practice ammo in hand is precious. Or to take a Saturday and make up a few month's worth? I've got a job, kids, club duties, and plenty of other hobbies. I don't need to kill the hours by sitting in front of a single-stage reloading press.

I agree completely.

jcwit has to right--it's not about "time" it's about "enjoyment

Yea, it is about enjoyment, but when you have 1200 9mms sitting there that need loaded, It not very enjoyable doing it on a single stage. I like to enjoy my reloading time without taking away from my family. I find a good progressive much more relaxing to operate than trying to run a bumper jack at warp three.

I'm a lead maintenance trouble shooter and engineer at a facility that's growing rapidly, and I also have to take callouts.

With me, the efficiency of a progressive trumps a single stage every time unless I'm loading rifle or doing workups with my pistol loads.

I can usually come pretty close to telling who is retired or single and who is working and has a family from the way a lot of posts are written. These things all play into the decision of what kind of press you need, or have grown to need, if you want to truly enjoy the hobby of reloading and shooting.

If you have nothing but time, I envy you.

That's why I typically recommend new re-loaders to look at Lee Classic Turret presses instead of a single stage when they buy their first press. Buying one holds off the need for a progressive for a longer period of time and it will be a good addition to go along with a progressive.

Just better efficiency you can grow into as your demand increases.

jcwit
May 11, 2014, 12:55 PM
Yea, it is about enjoyment, but when you have 1200 9mms sitting there that need loaded, It not very enjoyable doing it on a single stage.

I have 9mm cases in the 10's of thousands, have even given some to friends and sold some at gun shows. No need to load them all up, no need at all. And I shoot 3 to 4 times a week now, the range is 5 miles from my front door.

But then to, all the kids are grown and I retired way over a decade ago.

RainDodger
May 11, 2014, 01:22 PM
You just need to get older, then get retired. Then build up a stock of components and then load for a few years until you're ahead of the game. :)

All it takes is time.

tightgroup tiger
May 11, 2014, 03:53 PM
Time, maybe someday

jmorris
May 11, 2014, 04:50 PM
You just need to get older, then get retired. Then build up a stock of components and then load for a few years until you're ahead of the game.

All it takes is time.


That is not bad advice, unless you want to shoot, reload, work, play with the kids, cook, clean and enjoy other activities as well.

That is why I have built the machines I have (besides that being the fun part of reloading for me) I have reloaded my ammo for the weekend match at the same time I fed the kid breakfast, folded the clothes and packed my bags, pretty big help after a full week.

That is why there are so many choices out there. "A butt for every seat" so to speak.

The premise of the OP was that it took too much time for him to load. Only two answers at that point. Shoot less or reload faster.

gonoles_1980
May 11, 2014, 07:22 PM
I wasn't saying it takes too much time to reload. I was just noting you can take 2hrs to reload and 30 minutes to shoot them all. I probably spent 5hrs reloading 300 rounds this weekend, the wife and I in about an hour fired off about 250 rounds. I should have used a emocon, boards don't also show emotion. I enjoy the single stage reloading at this point.

splattergun
May 11, 2014, 07:34 PM
If I had many years of work left, I think I'd be more worried about time. Since I plan on retiring in a few years, I think the single stage press will be good. That and I can finally get back into making my own beer again.
We have a winner!
.

jmorris
May 12, 2014, 01:21 AM
I should have used a emocon, boards don't also show emotion. I enjoy the single stage reloading at this point.


I thought different of "the math doesn't work" part of it. If your happy, that is all that matters. Shooting, reloading and life in general.

mboylan
May 12, 2014, 03:10 AM
It's not your math, it's your method. Takes me 2.5-5 minutes to load 100 rounds, the only math problem with that, is that the negative impact on the wallet.
I cannot load that fast and still diligently check the powder level in each case.

jmorris
May 12, 2014, 11:37 AM
I cannot load that fast and still diligently check the powder level in each case.

Do different methods of how I do it using a powder check die.

http://s121.photobucket.com/user/jmorrismetal/media/reloading/bullet%20feeder/VID_20130305_152550_802_zps7819706b.mp4.html

http://s121.photobucket.com/user/jmorrismetal/media/VIDEO0114.mp4.html

And one where the only thing you are looking at is the case that is about to receive the bullet.
http://s121.photobucket.com/user/jmorrismetal/media/1050.mp4.html

cfullgraf
May 12, 2014, 12:31 PM
I wasn't saying it takes too much time to reload. I was just noting you can take 2hrs to reload and 30 minutes to shoot them all.

Beats running the bars. Cheaper too.:)

Much of the time I spend at the reloading bench would have been idle time anyway, watching Formula One racing, re-runs of NCIS, or re-runs on the History Channels.

So, as long as I make more ammunition than I shoot, who cares how long it takes or what equipment I use.

Interesting assessment of time spent loading and unloading ammunition though.:)

gamestalker
May 13, 2014, 03:19 PM
I just don't shoot enough in a single session to justify going progressive. And I also don't feel comfortable with a fast reloading operation, I like to closely monitor each step, especially the powder charge.

A single handgun session for me might consist of 100 rounds of each caliber. And a single rifle session runs between 50-100 rounds of each.

If I shot competitively I'm certain I would feel differently. But my loads are for self defense, hunting, and benching my rifles.

GS

cfullgraf
May 13, 2014, 03:45 PM
I just don't shoot enough in a single session to justify going progressive. And I also don't feel comfortable with a fast reloading operation, I like to closely monitor each step, especially the powder charge.

GS

I am in a similar situation. A single stage press still loads more ammunition than I can shoot.

Besides the gear head in me wanting to play with a new toy, I got a progressive to improve some efficiencies by doubling up tasks like resizing and mouth expanding as well as bullet seating and crimping. End result is less handling of the case.

I resize my cases in a separate operation from reloading and prefer to clean them after sizing, both handgun and rifle. I resize cases shortly after shooting, the the prepped and clean cases are stored away for a future loading session.

This affords me an opportunity to use a hand primer. I get to do 100% inspection of the primers before putting any powder in the case. The RCBS APS system is an exception though. I still do not resize cases on the Pro2000.

I found the resizing step of a progressive was the greatest cause of stoppages during reloading on the progressive. With an increase level of stoppages and jams, I found there was a great chance for me to have substandard reloads. So I have eliminated that during the more critical charging and bullet seating.

Because less is going on when I am actually loading the cases, i have time to give some attention to verifying the powder drop.

While many think I am crazy and not utilizing the full potential of a progressive, I will agree with the second point. But it makes me happy and comfortable that I have safe, serviceable reloads.

Even so, I still load more ammunition faster than I can shoot.

Maybe if I keep struggling with the progressive, I could get happy reloading fired case to finished round, but I have been there and done that with other equipment during my working career. In my retirement I do not care to fight those battles any more.

It works for me, it does not work for everyone. And that is fine.

RainDodger
May 13, 2014, 04:53 PM
Another option would be to get rid of the wife and you'd have more available ammo.

Potatohead
May 13, 2014, 05:14 PM
thats a thought.

buck460XVR
May 13, 2014, 06:05 PM
I am in a similar situation. A single stage press still loads more ammunition than I can shoot.



Same here, and I load for the two boys too. Nasty weather this winter meant fewer days shooting. Many were the days after football season was over that on Sunday afternoons I was wishin' I had more empty cases. :banghead:

I too shoot so many different handgun calibers with varied powder/bullet combos that 50-100 of each is about all I do of each between range visits. All in all it may be 500 total but generally 4-6 different calibers with different bullet weights and power charges within each caliber. In one range visit we may shoot 100 158gr .357 along with 50 125gr. Then 50 125 gr .38s. After that it could be 150 .44 mags and 150 .45 ACP topped off with 50 .460s. I don't load ammo when I need it, I load it when I have time and always have several thousand rounds ready on the shelf. I generally don't sit at the bench for more than a hour or so at a time, doing things in stages and batches. Sizing, belling and priming is done after work and before supper many times or when nuttin' is on T.V. 50 here, 100 there, before I know it I'm out of empties again. Charging and seating I generally do a complete batch with no interruptions, but even then, 150 rounds maybe takes me an hour or so. I spend as much time changing/adjusting dies and filling/emptying/adjusting the powder thrower, as I do actually stuffin' cases. If you look in my log book, very seldom do you see more than 100 of any one thing loaded at one time, but over the year I generally average 6000 rounds or so. Not a lot by many folk's standards, but more than enough for me and the boys.

gotboostvr
May 13, 2014, 06:09 PM
I started with (and am still using) a Lee Handpress, the one that looks like a big stapler. The quality of the finished product is still considerably ahead of factory ammo. My 308 match loads (168gr SMK, RL15, CCI 400, Nosler comp brass) make Federal Gold Medal Match look kinda junky in comparison and are MUCH more uniform in COAL.

Being said, it's too slow for how much 38 spcl and 44 (lite) mag I burn through. I'm planning on expanding to a turret press. But I can still use my Lee Handpress to deprime/resize while sitting on the couch! I can also reprime with my Auto prime while in other parts of the house. Throwing powder charges/seating a bullet are always done with undivided attention at the bench however.

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