Archery Experts


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Dr.Rob
May 26, 2014, 03:44 AM
I have inherited a modern made Mongol style (or maybe Hungarian/Magyar... it's definitely influenced by the east.) recurve bow that is most definitely NOT a toy. All I have to go by is a single marking on the bow.

Anyone recognize the maker's mark?

I haven't shot a bow since Boy Scouts but I have a hankering to learn again.

The case was crafted by the owner in an Asiatic style, and not a 'sold item'.

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Bobson
May 26, 2014, 04:30 AM
Beautiful bow. Definitely interested in reading up on it. Tag.

Dr.Rob
May 26, 2014, 04:55 AM
Well I think I found it on Amazon of all places.

http://www.amazon.com/Hungarian-Handmade-Flagella-Horsebow-30-80LBS/dp/B00DF4HKPQ

Looks like it MIGHT be a TANG H-1 made in China.

bainter1212
May 26, 2014, 07:06 AM
Good looking bow. Would love to know how she shoots.

9mmepiphany
May 26, 2014, 02:29 PM
I'm not surprised the Chinese would make it, but I have to admit that I didn't know there was a Hungarian style horsebow.

Is the Hungarian style shorter (like the Mogols) or longer (like the Japanese)

Dr.Rob
May 26, 2014, 03:34 PM
55 inches strung. Looks symmetrical, I think that hand written mark might be 28 50# or 28 inch, 50 pound draw.

It didn't come with arrows. Any specific arrow types for a beginner? Wood, bamboo, fiberglass? And any specific length?

nmlongbow
May 26, 2014, 06:41 PM
Wood, bamboo, carbon or aluminum are all fine. .500 spine for any arrows if drawn to 28"
I usually use arrows 1" longer then my draw. Feathers only with that bow and wrap the quill with thread or sinew if shooting on your hand. Feathers have sliced my hand before with a bad release, no fun. You can also use a thick leather glove or order one from 3Rivers. I really like bamboo for all of my bows but they are a lot of work.

These bows are often shot with a thumbring and pulled to the ear which is a much longer draw. My western draw is about 29" and horsebow style with a ring is 33". Longer draw means more holding weight and requires a stiffer arrow. This style of bow is difficult for a beginner especially without a shelf but they're fun and will force you to concentrate on every shot.

Dr.Rob
May 26, 2014, 07:36 PM
Learned a lot watching videos on the two styles of draw..this bow can do either. Have to see which is more natural for me.

Bobson
May 26, 2014, 11:09 PM
Wood, bamboo, carbon or aluminum are all fine. .500 spine for any arrows if drawn to 28"
Hmm. Is this applicable to all bow types (including modern compound), or just for recurves?

When I got started in archery with a compound, the guy at the pro shop told me I needed .400 spine arrows, based mutually on the bow's 70-pound draw weight and my 28.5" draw length.

.400 is the only size arrow I've ever used with that bow.

nmlongbow
May 27, 2014, 01:47 AM
.500 spine will work for most bows close to 50@28. A non center shot bow like the OP's would likely require a heavier point weight or longer arrow than a similar center shot bow.

Start longer then cut the arrows shorter according to what flies best. If the arrow still shows stiff then add point weight.

.400 spine arrows for a 70lb compound might be ok if you shoot an arrow shorter than 28" or use a light point. Many compound shooters like light arrows and points. My mid 60's weight center shot longbows and recurves do well with .340 spine arrows and they would probably tune with .300 spine. I prefer close to a 10 grains per pound arrow which is average for trad bows but heavy for compounds.

glistam
May 29, 2014, 01:59 PM
Looks like a nice one.

I'm a bit psyched because this is the area of archery I particiate in even if I can't claim to be a super expert. The technical term my mates use for this style of bow is a "static-earred recurve," due to the deep reflexed curvature and non-bending tips of the bow (the "ears" or siyahs if one prefers the Arabic term). This is a broad term for all bows of this type from Eastern Europe and Arab cultures all the way to the Mongols and the Manchu Chinese. Many people call them "horsebows" for short since virtually all cultures that used these bows were also famous for mounted archery.

I have a friend who is a historian of Mongol culture and shoots this type of bow (he also can read Chinese and Mongol) so I will see if he can figure out the maker.

I'm not surprised the Chinese would make it, but I have to admit that I didn't know there was a Hungarian style horsebow.

Is the Hungarian style shorter (like the Mogols) or longer (like the Japanese)

To my understanding there isn't per se a "Hungarian style" bow since Hungary is a modern country made up of several historical cultures. Magyars I think were the major ancestors of the region known for their horse-archers, hence many makers offer "Magyar style" bows. However, a large proportion of static-earred recurve makers in modern days are based in Hungary. Grozer, Flagella Dei and Kassai are some examples.

Dave Markowitz
May 31, 2014, 12:25 AM
That's definitely a bow made in China. There are a few sellers of them on eBay, among other online venues. It's not a Mongol-style bow, since it lacks string bridges. E.g., this one that I bought a couple years ago from eBay seller "handmadebow":

http://flintlock.org/pics/var/resizes/Chinese-Horsebow/chinese_horsebow_strung.jpg?m=1345857740

Closeup of string bridge:

http://flintlock.org/pics/var/resizes/Chinese-Horsebow/upper_siyah.jpg?m=1345857740

The bow is rated for 50# at 28".

My suggestion is to go with wood arrows from a place like 3Rivers Archery. I have shot my bow with both wood and carbon arrows. The carbons are fast, but because they are so light, the bow has significant hand shock. The heavier wood arrows still shoot fast and penetrate very well but the bow is much more pleasant to shoot with them.. At 20 yards the wood arrows will bury themselves up to the fletching in a straw bale, with some complete pass throughs.

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