Hunting knives


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wolverine_173
May 26, 2014, 03:19 AM
Which Knife do you guys use for hunting? which steel is best, blade shape etc..?

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Bobson
May 26, 2014, 03:34 AM
Mora knives like this one (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004TNWD40?pc_redir=1400974155&robot_redir=1) are exceptionally well received among hunters and fishermen. Don't let the price lead you to falsely assume it's low quality, as you'll be doing yourself a gross disservice. Read the hundreds of reviews on Amazon, and the many reviews here on THR (search "Mora" and/or "Morakniv").

This is one of several different models and varieties, but all are roughly equal in quality and similarly priced. Amazon has numerous options.

wolverine_173
May 26, 2014, 03:53 AM
I agree they are a great knife for the money

jmr40
May 26, 2014, 07:42 AM
Don't overthink this. We all do, and end up with our favorites. There is no "Best." I appreciate some of the better quality knives, but honestly usually end up using some type of mid sized folder. Lately using this.

http://www.sogknives.com/hunting/knives/flash-ii-straight-edge.html

Street price is $40-$50. It is lightweight and carries in my pocket well. Mine is razor sharp.

Like most of us I have a bunch of knives. Many costing more, many are nicer. But this SOG or one of the Mora knives get the job done without a lot of expense.

bikerdoc
May 26, 2014, 08:22 AM
I have an addiction and own over 2 dozen, each gets a turn in the field.

PPS43
May 26, 2014, 08:50 AM
Mora.

3212
May 26, 2014, 10:57 AM
Nothing fancy for me.I use inexpensive 3" to 3 1/2" folding blades.I made a heavier blade pelvis splitter when I worked as a machinist.

zooski22
May 26, 2014, 03:33 PM
Buck hunter 110

MCgunner
May 26, 2014, 04:30 PM
I like drop point blades and a Gerber sheath knife is my favorite skinner. My Gerber Gator serrator is still my fave field dressing knife. It's sharp, it's light, and it's grippy in the hand when it's wet with blood. The serrated part of the blade cuts through a sternum like butter. I've been using it for 25 years now.

wolverine_173
May 26, 2014, 11:39 PM
im not a fan of folders for hunting. fixed blades with full tang are more versitile if I were ever in a survival situation while hunting

MutinousDoug
May 27, 2014, 10:15 AM
I too am not a fan of folders for slaughtering game unless you are comfortable with putting your knives in the dishwasher afterwards. I don't put any of my hunting knives in the dishwasher, not even the SST ones.
I prefer a 4" spear, drop point or Nessmuk over any clip point for any work other than caping and prefer carbon steel to SST although SST is still useful.

The Bushmaster
May 27, 2014, 10:35 AM
Buck "Personal" 118...

brainwake
May 27, 2014, 11:09 AM
It seems that every year I change this up. For the most part I go with a drop points blade as well. I have found that I like 3 different knifes. I like to have a folder in the field. I mainly go with a folder because it fits in my pocket or pack easier. I don't like having the fixed blade on my hip because I tend to lay on my sides from time to time.

Last year I field dressed, skinned, quartered and de-boned all with a large Case Trapper. That worked out well for an all in one knife. But I also think I just had a mental challenge of wanting to do it all with a pocket knife.

Also, I don't dishwasher my knife...but with a folder, you have to take a little extra care when cleaning it. So it's a valid point that cleaning a fixed blade is easier.

You might also look for a folder with a gut hook if you like those. While not necessary, the gut hook is kind of nice.

But this year, I may just carry my trapper in the field and use a separate fixed for skinning and de-boning. I have a few to choose from. When butchering, its nice to have a few different ones. For skinning, I like something small and nimble. But sharp is the key. Then of course, when it is time to take the back straps or when you are clearing out the pelvis, you need a fairly long blade...well..4 or 5 inches. But not a very wide blade either. A narrow blade is useful when trying to reach up in to the pelvis and cut away the membranes that hold the bladder and other goodies.

I will make this comment about steel. If you buy quality steel, the benefit is that it will stay sharp longer. So if you are like me and sometimes butchering 3 or 4 deer in a weekend, you may not have to stop and sharpen as much or at all. But if you go with some cheaper steel, then you might need to touch up a little here and there. But it's really not a big deal to pull out a stone and touch up the edge a little. Harder steels stay sharp longer...but are harder to sharpen. So if you feel that you need to have a pro put your edge on, then make sure you get a hard steel.

atomchaser
May 27, 2014, 02:35 PM
I use the Fallkniven H1. Pricey but high quality steel, comfortable no slip handle and a blade shape that works well for me. The sheath is also easy to clean and immune to weather.

rszwieg
May 27, 2014, 04:06 PM
I used a Cold Steel Finn Bear this season and have no complaints. If I loose it it won't cost much to replace

almostfree
May 27, 2014, 07:04 PM
I use a Randall Model 3 Hunter with a 5" O1 carbon steel blade. It was a gift and it's too nice of a knife not to use. I also use it far more frequently for cutting meat at home.

tahoe2
May 27, 2014, 07:11 PM
Keep em sharp ! and they will serve you well ! The shortest blade is good for up inside the rib-cage & spinal area, I have found the other ones too long on smaller deer & antelope,
to work easily up in there ! Caping knives also work very well for me. :D Good luck !!

35Remfan
May 27, 2014, 07:32 PM
Buck 110. It was my dads hunting knife and it has field dressed countless deer. Over 40 years old. He wanted the best after he got out of the Marines and bought the 110 folder. It it is my number possesion from dad even over the deer rifles that were handed down. It is always on me when i am in the woods and i trust my life with it.

H&Hhunter
May 27, 2014, 08:26 PM
Big fan of the Blade-tech Professional hunter here. It is a 3.5" folder with a perfectly shaped drop point and one of the most ergonomically correct handles I've ever used on a folder. It is also thin and light for pocket carry, a serious tool for the serious hunter IMO. And good luck finding one at the moment apparently....I just looked and they seem to be discontinued.

sage5907
May 27, 2014, 10:14 PM
I also use a Buck 110 folding hunter. For many years I carried a short fixed blade knife made by Holland & Holland but after a few years the knife really showed hard use. In my whitetail hunting I like to lay down on the ground and slide under barbed wire fences and rocky surfaces were really tough on a fixed blade knife & case. A folding knife takes away the concern that I would push the blade into my leg. I won't go back to a fixed blade knife.

twofifty
May 27, 2014, 11:30 PM
Just looked at pics of the Blade Tech - nice knife. Tempting.

I get by with an Opinel folder, with a carbon blade that hones well and that I modified the tip shape on. Due to the smooth wood grip you have to really be aware of how you're holding it and where you're at in the animal. But it cleans up pretty easy in hot soapy water.

Water-Man
May 28, 2014, 01:34 AM
I've been using a Cold Steel Master Hunter for several years.

My version has Carbon V steel, drop point, flat ground, 4.5" blade and 3/16" wide. Great handle which holds up well when my hands get bloody and a good Kydex sheath.

ms6852
May 28, 2014, 02:45 AM
Cold Steel Master hunter or 110 Buck knife.

tactikel
May 28, 2014, 08:45 PM
The Grohmann (DH Russell) belt knife is widely regarded as the finest "hunting" knife. It is ergonomic, easy to sharpen, light, and will skin anything from a squirrel to a moose. Marble made many fine knives. Camping/ survival knives are legion, true hunting knives must skin, be useful in camp, be strong, light and handy, I prefer fixed blade for strength vs weight.

wgp
May 29, 2014, 07:47 PM
I have a real fondness for Bob Dozier knives and his Kydex horizontal sheaths. I have 4 Dozier knives, they are nothing fancy but very well made, simple and totally functional knives. Couple of kind of fancy Kershaws too.

wolverine_173
May 30, 2014, 02:18 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kL0CB9Ycqn8
here are the different sizes that are popular

Ankeny
May 30, 2014, 10:59 AM
I use a Randall... You have good taste. I use a Marbles Woodcrafter from before WWII because of the good old carbon steel. I stopped using it because it belonged to my father. The older Master Hunter from Cold Steel is good if you like carbon steel. I also have an older high end Kershaw that is easy to get sharp as a razor, but it doesn't hold an edge well. I mostly use Puma knives with the nod going to my 30 year old folding Game Warden. Ed Fowler is a local maker and his knoves are solid if you want something custom. His Pronghorn knife is really nice.

letsgohunt1
May 30, 2014, 11:18 PM
Buck 102U. Go fixed blade for sure. easier to clean and handle. btw im not caping elk etc.

T.R.
May 31, 2014, 08:39 AM
My favorite is Schrade mode 154UH. This is also known as the Golden Spike. Current knives are built overseas but quality is same as when Schrade was based within USA. I bought one for my nephew when he graduated from high school and we've hunted together a number of times. His import does the job same as my older model.

Check eBay and amazon for best value pricing.

TR

MCgunner
May 31, 2014, 10:09 AM
I had a carbon steel Schrade sheath knife when I was in high school that was wonderful. Lost it in all the moves from college, to college, new houses, etc. It had the old school leather washer grip on it.

I also have an older high end Kershaw that is easy to get sharp as a razor, but it doesn't hold an edge well

I have a Case Kodiak Hunter, about a 175 dollar knife now days, was given to me by my dad for Christmas in the 70s. One can shave his face with that knife, but it don't hold an edge for squat. Great skinner, but one cut on a hog's hide and it's dull. My Gerbers get arm shaving sharp and hold the edge well. They're much more affordable than the Case. The Case was a gift from my late father, a pretty knife with stag grip and brass furniture, but it's a keep sake, never use it. It's a 6" knife which is a might larger than I prefer, anyway.

I can't understand spending big bucks on a knife when affordable ones do the job. But, then, I have bought knives to use, not for the snob appeal. Over the years, I've settled on Gerber and Buck as great knives for the money.

I may look around for something carbon steel, though. That Schrade had a great edge that held up well. It was easy to sharpen, but held its edge well. Bucks are so friggin' hard, takes a while to get an edge on 'em, but they do get sharp and hold the edge due to their hardness.

Just some rambling observations by a non-knife guy on the tools of the hunt. :D

wolverine_173
May 31, 2014, 12:54 PM
I ended up wanting to buy about 6 knives I liked then decided instead of having 6 I should maybe have 2 or 3 nicer knives

Steel Talon
May 31, 2014, 05:21 PM
Pretty much a Buck loyalist for over 50 years.
Still have my original purchases.

Buck 119 My first "big Game " hunting knife
Buck 110 my first folder hunting knife
Buck Wrangler (Lg stockman) Long list of pocket knives But when this Large model arrived it became my daily carry.
Buck Vanguard given to me as a gift in the early 90's My favorite hunting knife....

wolverine_173
June 1, 2014, 01:54 AM
my dad always used a buck 110

ricebasher302
June 1, 2014, 01:23 PM
My all-time favorite elk knife is the discontinued Benchmade Rant drop-point in D2. It's just the right size for elk an moose. The handle and blafegeometry are nearly perfect for the type of field work I do.

Deer? I use several. Buck 110, Mora or Marttini, Browning Independence in 154CM.

gspn
June 1, 2014, 09:21 PM
i have a Buck 110 (fixed blade) and a few different folding blades depending on which gear bag I have with me.

Folders are more convenient to carry…but I hate cleaning them. Lots of meat and tissue gets down in the knife.

I don't use anything fancy…buck, gerber, stuff like that. I process several whitetail deer a year with those knives…it just doesn't take anything special. Keep 'em sharp and they'll last til you lose them. :D

I have no experience butchering larger animals…can't help you with knife needs for those.

Liberty1776
June 2, 2014, 10:24 PM
Mora's a great knife. I personally use an old Western bird hunter knife that was found in a garbage dump 'cause the pommel fell off. I epoxied on an antler knob and the knife still is shaving sharp and guts deer just fine 50+ years later. I have many others but this one always goes with me...

Zeke/PA
June 5, 2014, 07:29 AM
Many moons ago, a local supplier to the FFL's in the area had a card of 10 Queen's Cutlery folders on display at $4.50 /knife , sheath included.
I bought the entire card, kept one, gave one to my Dad and sold the rest.
I've carried the knife in the Deer woods ever since and used it extensively on many deer kills. The stainless blades are capable of shaving sharp edges and the knife is well constructed.

Barry the Bear
June 7, 2014, 12:29 AM
Condor Hudson Bay Knife does it for me.

Caliche Kid
June 8, 2014, 09:28 PM
I have tried lots of knives on hundreds of deer and big game. The Cold Steel Master Hunter will do most anything. I usually find myself using a Mora these days because the blade is not too wide and corners easily. I have worn out two of these. Actually, most any knife will work. It's the hand that makes the difference. If your cutting pelvis or sternum with a knife, stop. You will eventually get cut. There's no need. Also, on larger than deer big game, don't under estimate a good tomahawk. They can really make things easy.

MCgunner
June 10, 2014, 10:23 PM
Cutting the sternum is no problem on a whitetail with a serrated edge, why I like the Gerber Gator Serrator. Have only cut myself once in 62 years with a knife on game, that was a duck when I was about 15 years of age and really didn't know what I was doing. :D

I have saws for the pelvis.

brainwake
June 11, 2014, 10:49 AM
I also use a saw for the pelvis and taking the lower leg off...and sometimes the head or horns.

I picked up a new obsession for Swedish hand-forged axes this year, so next season my father-in-law was going to show me how to use them for butchering.

short barrel
June 11, 2014, 12:14 PM
Randall #1 for me. It will do the tiny chores plus the big ones.

Most folks don't like to carry them because they are so expensive, but I figure if I don't carry and use mine, someone else eventually will.

PlumRotten
June 13, 2014, 03:27 AM
Jackhawk 9000

http://i1135.photobucket.com/albums/m634/stilldointime305/Jackhawk9000.jpg (http://s1135.photobucket.com/user/stilldointime305/media/Jackhawk9000.jpg.html)

Sav .250
June 13, 2014, 07:28 AM
I don`t use a knife for "hunting" but I do use one to gut, skin, etc.
A Buck 110,folding.

Tophernj
June 13, 2014, 07:32 AM
I have not hunted before but will be this year.

I will be bringing my Kershaw Blur for general usage and either my Shawn Knowles' Bantam or one that I made with Shawn. Most likely I'll bring both.

C

brainwake
June 13, 2014, 09:45 AM
I have a 30 year old Buck 110 that I got as a boy scout. All these posts for the 110 make me want to carry it this year and finally get some blood on it. Well...I suppose it has had some fish blood before. But I think I might just give a carry in the field this year.

Funny story...when I went to the Army and checked in for basic training I had my knife with me. Of course I had to check it in until I left BT, but the guy taking stuff was like "Damn, what are you gonna do with this?"...and I was like..."hum....this IS the Army right?" I kind of felt like a proud redneck that day...:)

Andrew Leigh
June 13, 2014, 11:43 AM
Without stirring up the pot I often see hunting knife threads and I am never too sure what constitutes a hunting knife.

For some I see it would be pretty much any knife that accompanies one of a hunt. For most it appears to be predominately a knife for skinning an butchering. Obviously nobody (unless you are Rambo) actually uses a knife to hunt with.

So by hunting knife could I assume we are invariably talking of on of many variants of a drop point skinner type blade perhaps furnished with a gut hook in either fixed or folding blade configuration?

I ask this out of real curiosity and interest as I may well begin collecting some knives soon. I have a Gerber drop point skinner, I have an EDC folder that would skin without a problem. I look at knives some call hunting knives and doubt if I could ever skin with that blade shape.

I would classify a hunting knife as;
One that is carried on my person during a hunt.
It's use would be to slit a throat, and to eviscerate the animal in the field.
If necessary it could be used to quarter the animal.
It would be used for skinning.
It could function as knife to butcher with but I would have specialist knives for that, specifically a decent deboning knife.

Is that about it for you boys too?

buck460XVR
June 13, 2014, 12:36 PM
Without stirring up the pot I often see hunting knife threads and I am never too sure what constitutes a hunting knife.

For some I see it would be pretty much any knife that accompanies one of a hunt. For most it appears to be predominately a knife for skinning an butchering. Obviously nobody (unless you are Rambo) actually uses a knife to hunt with.

So by hunting knife could I assume we are invariably talking of on of many variants of a drop point skinner type blade perhaps furnished with a gut hook in either fixed or folding blade configuration?

I ask this out of real curiosity and interest as I may well begin collecting some knives soon. I have a Gerber drop point skinner, I have an EDC folder that would skin without a problem. I look at knives some call hunting knives and doubt if I could ever skin with that blade shape.

I would classify a hunting knife as;
One that is carried on my person during a hunt.
It's use would be to slit a throat, and to eviscerate the animal in the field.
If necessary it could be used to quarter the animal.
It would be used for skinning.
It could function as knife to butcher with but I would have specialist knives for that, specifically a decent deboning knife.

Is that about it for you boys too?


This makes me wonder how much confusion there is when someone asks about hunting boots? Are they boots one wears when hunting or are they boots one uses to kill animals with....hmmmmm.

Then there's hunting clothes.:D

illinoisburt
June 13, 2014, 01:03 PM
Andrew - I think for the most part you are correct. When people say hunting knife in this context they mean a knife carried while hunting for the purpose of field dressing animals, mostly big game or birds (waterfowl or pheasants). Generally any 3 to 5 inch knife with a somewhat solid standard shaped blade, either fixed or folder, works fine so long as it is sharp. Personally I like the older camillus western hunters - not terrible expensive, take and hold a good edge, and rubber handle has good grip when wet.

Knives are particular to their usage. Many years ago I did seasonal work in meat packing (pork picnic boning). We used nothing but extremely sharp (literal razor blade) carbon steel bladed boning knives. No idea of the brand, but the blades started out over 18 inches long and were constantly ground down in the sharpening room. We got them on the picnic lines once they were down to the basic shape of a 6 or 7 inch filet knife, 1/8" thick with strong slightly flexible spine. I use similar boning knives today for butchering deer and cutting up our summer hog roasts. Works wonders for breaking down animals and separating muscle groups, but would be a terrible choice for gutting or skinning.

Cannot guess the number of birds (mostly chickens) cut up over the years, but definitely thousands. Short stout blades about the size and shape of a paring knife work really well for this. Use the edge for cutting the skin and meat, point for splitting the breast bone and back.

Hunting with a knife? Well I've seen video of people doing it, but never in person and frankly don't feel like trying. Seems like its all hog hunting with dogs. Knives tend to be something BIG and SOLID - think crocodile dundee. Suspect that is the only time any of those type knives have ever been put to real use, and man is that a limited market. What is everyone else doing with them? Who knows...

josiewales
June 13, 2014, 01:37 PM
Buck 119 or 110. Love those knives!

Blue Brick
June 13, 2014, 08:15 PM
Schrade SCHF9

22-rimfire
June 16, 2014, 12:26 PM
The first knife I ever used for hunting (field dressing small game and deer) was a Case slip joint. I used one for years and never had a problem. I usually cleaned the knife in a stream or puddle after the field dressing chores (or took it home and cleaned it).

Then I used a large two-blade Schrade folder similar to the Buck 110. It always did the job and I liked the second blade if the knife got a little dull or I forgot to sharpen the other blade.

Then I used a Remington trapper (Camillus made). Liked this one and always carried a smallish fixed blade as well. But the trapper did most of the work. Bascially I was more nimble cutting inside the lung area with the smaller knife.

Now I carry a Dozier fixed blade or Spyderco Moran for field dressing chores in addition to the folder. I like to keep the field knife under 5", preferrably 4" for hunting duties. The slip joint is mostly a two blade GEC #23 or #42 these days.

Deltaboy
June 16, 2014, 01:06 PM
OT small sharpfinger and a OT version of the Golden Spike.

a-sheepdog
June 17, 2014, 11:04 PM
I watched a guide with a scalpel and have gone to using a taxidermist scalpel with a 3" blade for my skinning of deer/hogs and most any other mammal. For fish I still use a filet knife. I also agree with a couple of the other posters, the Mora knives are very user friendly. I generally carry a folding knife of some sort in my pocket.

kbbailey
June 17, 2014, 11:20 PM
I really like my Buck Vanguard but it gets buried under the bibs in the winter. I generally keep a decent folder with pocket clip on the outer layer.

CApighunter
June 22, 2014, 06:15 AM
I have two I use regularly. RAT Cutlery ESEE 4 for deer and turkey, and a 7 inch Kabar for pig hunting, especially in thick brush.

eastbank
June 24, 2014, 06:24 PM
can any one ID this knife? the only mark on the blade and scabbard is a small anvil,it is very well made and has seen use. i traded an other knife for it from a african tracker on my hunting trip to africa in may-june. thanks eastbank.

eastbank
June 24, 2014, 06:28 PM
pictures of the knife.

Andrew Leigh
June 25, 2014, 05:44 AM
You were in Africa in May and June and did not make a turn past me :confused:........... was that South Africa.

So far a google search would reveal that the anvil mark is for a Buck custom knife. But buck stamps them in a different position and orientation and the stamp is more defined with an additional line in the anvil, so it may well be something else.

Andrew Leigh
June 25, 2014, 05:53 AM
You owe me :D.

It appears to be a hand forged knife made by a guy called Smith in South Africa.

He has since refined the mark but that particular mark was used from 2000 - 2004 so your knife is at least 10 years old.

Follow this link if you want to contact them for further details.

http://www.knifemakersdirectory.com/listing.asp?ListingID=8

Sniper66
June 26, 2014, 05:00 PM
I like Buck Knives for all sorts of reasons. I think they are one of the best values out there and I really like the company.

Alaskan
June 28, 2014, 07:32 PM
This is my latest. I love it. It holds an edge and is really easy to find when you drop it in the grass.

http://www.outdooredge.com/SwingBlaze-p/swingblaze.htm

red rick
June 28, 2014, 10:23 PM
My two favorites for deer hunting are the Buck 110 , very easy to carry and fits my hand so naturally , but harder to clean , because it is a folder . The other is a Buck 105 fixed blade , not to big and not to small , easy to clean , but a little less convenient to carry , because it is longer than a folder .

I see more 110's at my hunting club than anything else .

Elkins45
June 29, 2014, 01:00 PM
A fixed blade is highly recommended. Cleaning the congealed fat out of the blade groove of a folder gets old after a couple of years.

The Mora knives mentioned are excellent choices, and certainly the most economical ones. You can get a great knife for less than the cost of a completely unsharpenable hunk of garbage from the sporting goods section of the local XMart.

I own more knives than I do guns, and I once processed a small doe with a $200 Dozier, but the knife I always keep coming back to is the Beretta Zytel Loveless dropped point hunter. You can generally find them <$50 and the blade shape is just ideal. Here's an interesting story about losing it and then finding it years later: http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/940433-Found-my-long-lost-Beretta-Loveless-with-the-help-of-my-tractor-New-Pix!

http://www.gunblast.com/images/Fryxell_KnifeSteels/Fig.-4-Beretta-Loveless.jpg

Last year I used an Entrek Javalina.

http://www.onestopknifeshop.com/store/media/entrek/en-javalina.jpg

kbbailey
July 2, 2014, 04:41 PM
I just uncovered my old Schrade Golden Spike. It's been missing for years. As soon as I make a new sheath...it'll be back in the rotation.

SlayerOfBunnies
July 2, 2014, 05:15 PM
Becker BK11.

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