Glass bedding vs. Pillar bedding


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Texan6G
June 10, 2014, 07:31 PM
Is there a rule of thumb when pillar bedding is necessary in addition to glass bedding an action. I am talking about a Win Model 70 in 30-06 here in the process of being restocked in Claro Walnut. I will definately glass bed the action, but was trying to avoid the expense of buying a drilling fixture for a one shot project. Not against going to a gunsmith, just trying to gain the satisfaction of learning and doing it myself.

Thanks for your advise.

Molan Labe

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natman
June 10, 2014, 08:21 PM
Glass bedding and pillar bedding compliment each other. Pillar bedding eliminates any variation due to stock compression. That's all it does, nice as it is.

Glass bedding gives the receiver one and only one place to be. It prevents stress on the receiver and keeps the receiver's position consistent from shot to shot.

Glass bedding will give you 90% of the improvement you're going to get from bedding. Pillars are a nice touch thereafter.

rcmodel
June 10, 2014, 08:30 PM
You can do both at the same time, without a drill fixture.

Pillar bedding will totally prevent the wood stock from eventually crushing from the actions screws over the years and changing the glass bedding pressure contact points.

I did my first one in 1962 with an electric hand drill and some steel tubing I cut off at work with a hacksaw.

I think that was before modern 'pillar bedding' had been invented yet?
It just seemed like a good idea at the time to do it.

Trimmed to exact length with a file & some elbow grease.
A belt sander would have made. 2 minute fitting job out of them.

Drill the over-size holes for the pillars following the stock bolts holes that are already there.
Then glass bed the pillars in the stock with the action & screws holding them in place.

Then come back the next day and glass bed the rest of the stock.

rc

LeonCarr
June 10, 2014, 11:13 PM
The Germans used Pillar Bedding on Mauser 98Ks.

Thin walled brass pillars on the rifle I had.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

rcmodel
June 10, 2014, 11:49 PM
That is probably correct.

But they failed to also use glass bedding to support the pillars and action and keep the stock from shrinking up and leaving the sleeves and action rattling around in the shrunken or swelled stock.

Not quite the same thing at all.

rc

Texan6G
June 11, 2014, 08:08 PM
Gentlemen,
Thank you all for your counsel. Pillar bedding it is! I like the idea of being able to properly torque the stock screws without crushing the wood. If I am understanding correctly, within reason of course, drill the hole for the pillars as best you can, but the bedding compound makes up for any deviation?

rcmodel
June 11, 2014, 08:30 PM
Yes, exactly.

Do your homework on how best to center & support the action and guard while glassing the pillars in place before bedding is completed.

It's not rocket science, or I could't have done it with no instructions or help when I was 18, 52 years ago.

PS: I guess the alternative, and probably a more accurate method would be to:
Glass bed the action first.
Then drill out the guard screw holes oversize.
Then cut and fit the pillars to exact length.
Then, glass them in place to the pre-bedded rifle.

rc

Texan6G
June 11, 2014, 11:12 PM
Thanks RC, good to know I don't have to have it accurate to the thousands of an inch, it's just a hunting rifle, but MOA is always nice.

243winxb
June 12, 2014, 09:13 AM
Drill the wood stock holes a little bigger. Let the Brownell's Acraglas Liquid epoxy bedding compound run down into and around the stock screws. This keeps the wood from being compressed. Use latex putty & plenty of release agent (petroleum jelly). Do what RC said, takes less Acraglas.

243winxb
June 12, 2014, 12:51 PM
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/k=pillar+bedding/cid=0/tid=0/guntech/ And more http://www.stockysstocks.com/pdf/acraglas.pdf

Texan6G
June 13, 2014, 06:57 PM
Thank you 243winxb! I can do this! :-)

barnetmill
June 14, 2014, 12:40 AM
I glass bed the barrel channel too, but leave a little space so the barrel is free floated. Whether pillar bedding is needed for the action if one is extremely generous with the glass on all action surfaces is a question that I need to answer. I will ask my gunsmith next time I drop by his place.

BBBBill
June 14, 2014, 01:02 AM
...Whether pillar bedding is needed for the action if one is extremely generous with the glass on all action surfaces is a question that I need to answer.... Simple answer. The pillars eliminate the possibility of the action loosening due to compression of the wood (or foam filler in a glass stock) between the action and the bottom metal. If that is a concern to you, then use the pillars.

rcmodel
June 14, 2014, 01:52 AM
+1
What he said!

Glass supports the action on the top surface of the stock perfectly.

But nothing supports the stock between there and the bottom of the stock where the guard screws and bottom metal are trying to crush it enough to get some relief from being torqued off!

Except perfectly fitted for length metal pillars.

rc

243winxb
June 16, 2014, 10:18 PM
Under the bottom metal, i have drilled 3 small blind holes in the stock to get fresh wood. Just deep enough to hold some Acraglas. This keeps the wood from compressing if no pillars are used.

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