I Don't Like Polymer Guns Because....


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kokapelli
July 19, 2014, 09:27 AM
I don't like Polymer guns because...
I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer rather than personal biases based on unsubstantiated claims.

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sauer1911
July 19, 2014, 09:36 AM
Um, I dont like polymer guns because they ah, hmmmm:(

NEVER JAM! Or mine never have. :neener:

be safe

WestKentucky
July 19, 2014, 09:42 AM
I dislike them for a couple reasons, not because they are polymer. Every poly frame I have had was a very inaccurate gun and had feed problems. That's no fault of the polymer. The second, worse point is that glock refuses to make a gun that I can shoot confortably. When I grip a glock the knuckle on my thumb is tight against the frame along the hump where the slide extends rearward from the grip. Same on every glock product from the 17 to the 42.

potmetal
July 19, 2014, 09:46 AM
I have to admit, I have enjoyed changing grip panels on old steel guns. It gives you a chance to dress up a gun, kinda like a new set of tires on your car. You can't do that with a polymer frame. I guess you could look for multi colored slip on grips, but it's just not quite the same. I have steel pistols and two polymer pistols. Mine are hammer fired, sa/da, not striker fired. They work and I like them.

Vodoun da Vinci
July 19, 2014, 09:51 AM
I was repulsed by "plastic" guns until last Summer when my Wife and I went on a search to find our "Soul Mate" and inherently accurate/personally friendly CCL pistols. I shot everything I could rent, borrow, or buy and that ended up being virtually *every* pistol and revolver commonly available.

The most accurate pistol in my hands after a 30 year shooting hiatus, right 'out the box, no practice/no muss/no fuss was a Glock model 19. I was shocked----I hate 'em. They rock. Picked up a G26 right after that and shot rapid fire 4" groups at 21' the first go. I bought one. Then I shot a Beretta Px4 SC and experienced the same phenomenon.

We bought 5 hand guns last year and 4 of them were polymer framed. The 5th was a Colt 1903 made in 1930.

I like polymer guns to the point I now could care less - I actually prefer polymer as it's less worry some about rust or finish issues.

VooDoo

Sergei Mosin
July 19, 2014, 10:00 AM
I didn't like polymer guns until I bought my LCR. Even then, I figured it was a one-off. Then I discovered H&K. Two USPs and a VP9 later, it's just another material with its own set of properties that comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, no different than steel or aluminum or anything else.

wlewisiii
July 19, 2014, 10:06 AM
Got no inherent problem with them. I do tend to prefer steel, but have owned and enjoyed several polymer pistols (P97, Glock 19) as well. Probably the best word for my attitude is "meh".

As mentioned above, all materials come with pluses and minuses. At the moment I'm enjoying an all steel RIA 1911. Tomorrow? I don't know and I really don't care. If it does it's job it can be made out of silly putty for all I care.

bannockburn
July 19, 2014, 10:23 AM
I like traditional blue steel and wood grips on any number of semi-autos but I also like the lighter weight and innovative technology that polymer pistols bring to the marketplace.

Basically I would have to say that all guns are welcome in my collection no matter what they're made of.

460Kodiak
July 19, 2014, 10:28 AM
I've never had an issue with a polymer gun that was brought on due to the gun being made of polymer. They are easy to care for, they function, and some companies have even managed to make some nice looking ones.

The traditionalist in me says all metal guns are better, but maybe that's just because I'm mostly a revolver guy. The LCR is hard for me to take.

Captain33036
July 19, 2014, 10:34 AM
I started out liking and owning polymer guns. I have had the Glock 26, 19 and 17. S&W M&P Shield, full sized M&P 9, Ruger SR9c. Also shot an H&K USP and XD line guns as well as an M&P 45.

After a while and some experience working on them, I found them to be a solution in search of a problem. No inherent value or reason for the polymer frame or striker fire system.

I liked Glock's, initially, because I could mod them as much as I wanted. I did, used them in a couple contests and did well. But, I could also get a 1911 and mod it until the cows came home. And do better at whatever game I wanted.

I searched for a long time to get the right sub compact 9mm for CC. I had the G26 for some time, liked it, shot it well, but then opted for the slimmer, lighter Shield.

But, then found the SIG 938 and found it liked it much better. It had a better profile than the Shield, was lighter, carried the same 7 rounds in the extended mag and shot as well.

I shot an H&K USP and liked it very much. But, to me, it balanced as well, felt as good and shot as well as a SIG 226 and 1911. It was as expensive or more, than some of these and harder to find accessories for it. So, no advantage.

I have nothing against polymer framed guns. They are durable and they work. They are used by some militaries around the world. I just find that there are better arms out there. Sometimes at a bit more cost, but well worth it.

I will add one thing and please do not judge...just my opinion...when I finally inspected and understood the Glock firing system...essentially a stamped trigger bar ...slipping off ...of the post on the striker pin....I RAN to sell it and get another 1911.

Hope this helps

Billy Shears
July 19, 2014, 10:39 AM
I don't think you'll see many problems with the polymer guns -- at least none attributable to the use of polymer frames. They've been around for decades for now, and have become so prevalent that almost all new designs use them. This is because they work. They're durable; they're rust proof; they're light; and if they're well designed, they can be ergonomic as hell. My Walther PPQ has a grip that feels as though it was designed specifically for my hand. It's as naturally pointing and comfortable as any gun I've ever owned, and that includes my 1911s, and my Hi Power with Spegel grips. My Steyr runs a close second in that department.

Polymer-framed guns will never have the beauty of finely blued steel guns with walnut grips. No modern "combat tupperware" will ever compete in looks with pre-war handguns with their rich, highly-polished blueing, and finely checkered wood grips. But the fact is that practical benefits of polymer frames and modern, corrosion resistant finishes make for guns that are orders of magnitude better from a convenience and maintenance standpoint, and that's what matters to most people. And to be fair, even all steel guns can't compete with the ones from decades ago in the finish department; the labor costs are too high. Polymer is here to stay, and I have no problem with it. I love my Walther PPQ, and my PPS, and they've replaced the all steel guns I used to carry, because they're just as accurate, just as reliable, and easier to maintain, not to mention a bit lighter. From a functionality standpoint, there's no downside.

Pilot
July 19, 2014, 10:41 AM
I can't vote because while me preference is metal (steel, or aluminum alloy) I have nothing against polymer guns, and think they have their place. I do not own any anymore, but am looking at a single stack, subcompact 9MM, and this is where polymer really shines (not pun) imho. A Shield or similar seems like the ideal carry gun for concealment. Also, with HK coming out with the VP9, I may be a convert to polymer/striker fired.

bds
July 19, 2014, 10:51 AM
I don't like Polymer guns because...
They complicated my life. I would have been happy with "metal" guns but not anymore.

I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer rather than personal biases based on unsubstantiated claims.
They caused many problems in my life. I was happy with 1911/Sig 226. The first time I held a Glock 17 I went, "Are you kidding me? Who would make a gun out of plastic? It's gotta be a passing fad". But that introduction in late 80s got me curious about polymer guns and things got complicated since. :D

I was happy shooting matches with 1911/226 and when I got faster stage times from a Glock 17 that I never shot before, I tried to dislike it saying, "But it's got poor trigger, grip is blocky, etc." but I ended up changing my match pistols to Glocks. :eek:

When 40-9 conversion barrels came out so I could shoot 9mm out of my 40S&W Glocks, I ended up having to sell G17/G19/G26 and replace them with G22/G23/G27 along with conversion barrels for all of them.

When I whined about poor ergonomics of Glocks and how I have to shift my grip to release the magazine, M&P40/45 and PT145 SA/DA solved the ergonomics issue with grip inserts and shorter reach to controls. Of course, I had to buy more pistols.

Yeah, I hate them because now I HAVE to factor them in whenever I consider a new pistol purchase. When my wife wanted a pocket 380, I had to buy another polymer gun (TCP 738). When I was considering a 10mm pistol, I could not ignore the Glock 20SF with shorter reach to trigger and softer recoil from polymer frame. Dang, now it's the next gun purchase I am planning on. And since I can shoot 40S&W with a conversion barrel, I would have to buy another conversion barrel too.

I hate polymer guns because they complicate my life. ;)

csa77
July 19, 2014, 11:27 AM
I don't like how light polymer guns are. Light weight is good for carry but in a gaming gun I want it heavy

DeepSouth
July 19, 2014, 11:29 AM
I don't really care for them, I'm a bit of a traditionalist. Honestly the only advantage to poly that I have found is weight, which ironically is part of why I don't really care for them. Sure I want my CCW to be light so I sought out a poly gun, but for non-carry guns I'll go wood and steel every time.

C0untZer0
July 19, 2014, 11:31 AM
One less thing to rust

460Kodiak
July 19, 2014, 01:53 PM
You know now that I think about it, what I really like about polymer guns is that they are useful, but the fact that lots of plastic is involved makes it feel a little like a disposable item. Not that I don't value them, but they are easily replaced if damaged or lost. I feel next to no attachment to them. They get used and carried without much thought of holster wear or banging it n to something by accident.

It's like I have a nice car in the garage for the weekends, but a Subaru to get around and carry on everyday life with.

Big Shrek
July 19, 2014, 02:33 PM
If you are involved in a self-defense shooting and they take your Polymer gun,
you just go out and buy another just like it...:)

If you are involved in a self-defense shooting and they take your 1911 or other steel gun,
you cry...a LOT...and can't replace it because you spent so much time pimping it...:banghead:
much like loosing a dog, you have lost your best friend...

bds
July 19, 2014, 02:51 PM
Wait, I thought this thread was about why we DON'T LIKE polymer guns ... :rolleyes: :D

Elkins45
July 19, 2014, 03:07 PM
I like the lightness, recoil absorption and corrosion resistance.

I don't like the need to buy a new gun if you have a case head failure.

Valkman
July 19, 2014, 03:18 PM
I don't like the fact that my XD's hold 13 rds of .45, way too many. :) Or how easy they are to clean, to shoot and to carry.

Hurryin' Hoosier
July 19, 2014, 03:25 PM
Because John Moses Browning said to use steel! :neener:

amd6547
July 19, 2014, 03:32 PM
I have often wished I could go back in time and put a Glock 17 in John Brownings hand and get his reaction.

Hurryin' Hoosier
July 19, 2014, 04:58 PM
I have often wished I could go back in time and put a Glock 17 in John Brownings hand and get his reaction.
Really? Do you enjoy seeing people try to laugh and throw up at the same time?

Vodoun da Vinci
July 19, 2014, 05:05 PM
Really? Do you enjoy seeing people try to laugh and throw up at the same time?

Boy, I dunno....If JMB were designing the Colt 1903 Model M today he'd most certainly at least evaluate the possibilities of doing it with polymer I'd think. A polymer framed model M in .32 or .380 would put one more gun on my Bucket List.

I'd have to possess it.

VooDoo

skoro
July 19, 2014, 05:10 PM
I prefer all metal, but I have polymers that I like pretty well.

Ed4032
July 19, 2014, 05:37 PM
It is the future, especially for carry. Light weight, durable and cheap to produce. But my love for steel and walnut will never fade. Torn between two lovers. Feeling like a fool. Wait that's a song. Never mind. I'm going to the range. Not sure who I'll take. Maybe both. Love triangles are so complicated.

Waveski
July 19, 2014, 06:21 PM
Sorry , but there is nothing cool about polymer. Can't buff it ; can't jazz it up with a new set of walnut. If it does not please my eyes , I don't want it.

frankiestoys
July 19, 2014, 06:22 PM
I don't necessarily dislike like them I just don't prefer them I've owned several but just never seem to warm up to them , I'm kinda old school I guess ... i like 1911's , revolvers ,Sigs (p series)and Beretta(92) just to mention a few .The polymer guns have there place and often make good edc guns WTS some of the aluminum frame pistols can also do the same thing. There's no right or wrong answer just preferences .

Cocked & Locked
July 19, 2014, 07:05 PM
I've got three PLASTIC guns but don't really like them. Kel Tec PF9 & P32, and a S&W Shield.

I've owned Glock 17, 17L, 19, 20, 23, 27 pistols but never could really find anything about them I liked...obviously I tried, then I sold them.

Like Waveski said a couple post up, "...can't jazz it up with a new set of walnut".

like this...

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6263277/409802505.jpg

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6263277/409491875.jpg

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6263277/407810010.jpg

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6259764/381416353.jpg

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/9381895/373123963.jpg

So Forth and So On...

kokapelli
July 19, 2014, 07:16 PM
This is now turning into exactly what I was trying to avoid when I said "I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer" rather than how you feel about Polymer.

ritepath
July 19, 2014, 07:20 PM
I have both....I don't care.

I'm having a bit of an issue with my next pistol.

CZ75 or CZ P-09

Maybe a Canik and a Ruger 9E

Or just a plain ole g34 or g20

Or save up some more and get a p226

Saleen322
July 19, 2014, 07:22 PM
Polymer has its place and they brought a lot of new people to shooting. They are inexpensive to make, accurate enough for what they are designed to do, and handle exposure to the elements well. I own one and it has done everything the manufacturer advertised it would do. I plan to keep it.

That said, I have dozens and dozens (....and dozens and dozens, etc :D) of metal guns. I have no plans (or need) for another poly pistol but I will continue to purchase metal firearms. YMMV

Cocked & Locked
July 19, 2014, 07:29 PM
This is now turning into exactly what I was trying to avoid when I said "I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer" rather than how you feel about Polymer.


Uh Oh...sorry :o

Hurryin' Hoosier
July 19, 2014, 07:35 PM
Boy, I dunno....If JMB were designing the Colt 1903 Model M today he'd most certainly at least evaluate the possibilities of doing it with polymer I'd think.

I doubt it. John Moses had taste.

usp9
July 19, 2014, 07:42 PM
Polymer rules. Less rust and less weight.

GEM
July 19, 2014, 08:39 PM
I don't like Polymer guns because they don't let me practice malfunction drills as much as my all metal more expensive 1911.

Otherwise, I find the topic a big Yawn.

DeepSouth
July 20, 2014, 12:00 AM
This is now turning into exactly what I was trying to avoid when I said "I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer" rather than how you feel about Polymer.

That's because their aren't really any problems associated directly with the polymer, it holds up well enough for basically everyone.....It's just boring.
Many People don't like them and therefore they voice that opinion when a thread is titled "I don't like Polymer guns because....."

Broker
July 20, 2014, 12:16 AM
I like SOME polymer guns. Glocks, not so much. I have polymer Kahrs, S&W M&Ps, & Sigs that I really like. I don't like ALL metal frame guns, either. BHP's for example. Many actually love 'em. I could never warm up to them. And I'd rather have a good slingshot & a pocket full of ball bearings than to carry a Glock. I can shoot the slingshot MUCH better. My opinion only, of course.

Billy Shears
July 20, 2014, 02:07 AM
This is now turning into exactly what I was trying to avoid when I said "I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer" rather than how you feel about Polymer.
That's because their aren't really any problems associated directly with the polymer, it holds up well enough for basically everyone.....It's just boring.
Many People don't like them and therefore they voice that opinion when a thread is titled "I don't like Polymer guns because....."
Exactly. What did you expect? You're not going to see many accounts of such issues, because there aren't many such issues. Polymer-framed guns have been around long enough now to prove themselves basically as durable and reliable as steel-framed guns. I mean, what sort of issues are you expecting people to have? Most of the potential failures a polymer framed gun could have have been taken into account and engineered out by the manufacturers. Steel is still used for slide rails, and numerous internal parts where the structural properties and heat resistance of steel are needed, and polymer is used where it suffices, and if the design is a good one (and most of the best selling ones are these days), the guns work as well as guns generally ever do for their intended purposes.

Potatohead
July 20, 2014, 04:44 AM
That's because their aren't really any problems associated directly with the polymer, it holds up well enough for basically everyone.....It's just boring.
Many People don't like them and therefore they voice that opinion when a thread is titled "I don't like Polymer guns because....."
yea. I cant think of to many "problems" that can be attributed just to the polymer.

Deus Machina
July 20, 2014, 06:29 AM
I can't attribute any of my complaints to the material itself, really.
I've just never found one that I like as much as my alloy-framed guns. The trigger always feels wrong somehow. Weird disconnect points, or the trigger action is off, or there's not obvious disconnect point, or it's just plain squishy.
Or the grip just isn't as nice.
If you need a complaint, I guess I do prefer how my alloy-framed guns balance.

ljnowell
July 20, 2014, 07:55 AM
My first gun was polymer. I inherited another. All of my other guns are all metal. Not that i wouldn't ever buy another polymer gun, in fact I have my eye on one now, it just happens I have been on a revolver kick for a few years now.

tarosean
July 20, 2014, 08:11 AM
I have often wished I could go back in time and put a Glock 17 in John Brownings hand and get his reaction


He would sue from all the patent infringments of his :)

Chocolate Bayou
July 20, 2014, 08:17 AM
They remind me too much of the toy guns we used to play with as a kid. But really, I have a couple of XD's in 9mm that I like for polymer guns, but the feel of all metal with 8 rounds and a hammer, carried cocked and locked makes me feel a lot better than a striker gun with 18 rounds. Just my preference.

jimbo555
July 20, 2014, 08:30 AM
I sold my glocks. I had intermittent fte's that required ejecting the mag. and turning it upside down to get the case out. Only polymer handgun I have now is a ruger lc9. It works fine but I don't carry it anymore. I have returned to revolvers.

Armor Snail
July 20, 2014, 09:19 AM
200743

Who says you can't put nice grips on poly frames? Can't think of any other one though at the moment.

290RS maybe.

460Kodiak
July 20, 2014, 11:00 AM
A while ago I saw a picture of a Glock that had been totally chewed up and spit out by a large dog of some kind. Obviously with an all metal gun, the chances of it surviving in a functional state may be better as the dog would probably realize it just isn't any fun, though the grips would certainly get messed up.

So the only problem I can think of that is directly attributed to polymer is that it is less resistant to a ill trained pet's need to chew on things. Otherwise it holds up well.

Captains1911
July 20, 2014, 12:29 PM
I like reliable guns that fit my needs and I can shoot well, regardless of the material they are made of. It just so happens that polymer guns fit this bill better for me than non-polymer.

huntsman
July 20, 2014, 12:46 PM
I don't like Polymer guns because...
I would like to see actual problems experienced with Polymer rather than personal biases based on unsubstantiated claims.
I don't like them period(they're Plastic), but I own two and so far haven't had any issues with either. Sorry for the personal bias but that's all I got.

X-Rap
July 20, 2014, 02:43 PM
Because they melt if you throw them in a fire??? Can't think of another reason.

tarosean
July 20, 2014, 02:59 PM
They remind me too much of the toy guns we used to play with as a kid.

You must be relatively young.... Even my toy guns were made out of metal.. That is of course, if you count pot metal/die-cast/zamak as "real" metals... :)

Fiv3r
July 20, 2014, 03:00 PM
I don't have any issues with polymer guns at all. I like them:) They allow for the average shooter to get a high quality firearm at a reasonable price.

That said, I prefer big ol' metal guns. Most of my carry side arms that I'm not trying to conceal are just that. A 92FS, or a full size 1911, or a stainless .357.

I still have several polymer guns that I shoot often though. My nightstand gun is an FNX. I carry an FNS-40 when I can't get 9mm or .45 ammo. Even my beloved little Ruger Mkiii is the kind with the full polymer frame. I generally don't walk the dog without carrying my Ruger LCP in my pocket. Polymer has always performed well for me.

I just like the look and feel of metal more.

armoredman
July 20, 2014, 03:03 PM
I never liked polymer, with the really odd exception of the HK VP70z, (yeah, I know, I need help), until I had my own, starting with the CZ SP-01 Phantom, through the CZ P-07 and CZ P-09.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b13/armoredman/accessorizep07.jpg (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/armoredman/media/accessorizep07.jpg.html)

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b13/armoredman/CZ%20P-09/P-09withPhantom_zpsc538f1ad.jpg (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/armoredman/media/CZ%20P-09/P-09withPhantom_zpsc538f1ad.jpg.html)

I still don't like Glock, but THAT has nothing to do with the frame material. ;)

kwguy
July 20, 2014, 03:11 PM
No issues with polymer. It works. But, all metal feels good in the hand. As a 'working gun' polymer is fine, but shooting a nice 1911 vs a glock 19 is like driving a really nice older sports car vs a... New honda or something, but I like both.

I would LOVE to see what JMB would have come up with today though...

HankC
July 20, 2014, 03:50 PM
Because I like all steel, I don't even like aluminum frame!

horsemen61
July 20, 2014, 04:03 PM
Glock 19 nuff said

Kidslash
July 20, 2014, 04:04 PM
I like my polymer guns as much as my steel framed guns.

Welding Rod
July 20, 2014, 04:16 PM
I admire metal guns, but appreciate the practical advantages of poly too... Especially since getting my Five Seven - love the light weight.

420Stainless
July 20, 2014, 06:17 PM
Most of them are ugly designs (to my eyes). Other than that, I have no particular problems with them.

Sauer Grapes
July 20, 2014, 07:57 PM
I have a few poly guns. BORING!
They are useful though. I still prefer steel\alloy though.

Rittmeister
July 20, 2014, 11:42 PM
I have no particular feeling about polymer as a material; I like that most polymer guns are lightweight. My issue is generally with the striker-fired actions that most polymer guns use. I find that I really don't care for the trigger pull in Glocks, or the M&P (stock that is, I've never experienced an Apex trigger), or the Ruger SR series. I shot an XD years ago but don't remember much about it. Glock/M&P I just don't shoot accurately; I wanted very badly to like the M&P but it didn't work out and I sold it off.

That said, I currently own a CZ P07, which I think is FANTASTIC. A light, compact polymer-framed gun with a more traditional DA/SA action; what's not to like?

ljnowell
July 21, 2014, 01:31 AM
You must be relatively young.... Even my toy guns were made out of metal.. That is of course, if you count pot metal/die-cast/zamak as "real" metals... :)


Well, hi-point certainly counts it as metal!

rwehnau
July 21, 2014, 06:22 AM
Because I don't want a Tupperware revolver

JWH321
July 21, 2014, 07:03 AM
I have never even given it much thought. I have polymer, steel and alloy guns. I seem to like my SP2022 more than any of the others. I carry the P938 most of the time. I have a 1911 that seems like a boat anchor, and an Airweight that I will never let go of.

To me, if it works, I like it. If it does not work, I don't keep it. I suspect that polymer has allowed most of us to own guns that would be prohibitively expensive if they were steel or alloy. I also suspect that polymer has allowed the manufacturers to introduce new guns more quickly and to develop technology at a faster rate and we have all benefitted from that.

But then, when the Pontiac Firebird was introduced without good "steel bumpers", I can remember my Dad saying that cars would never be safe to drive again. Try to find a car with steel bumpers. Then ask yourself if you would buy one if there were.

tomrkba
July 21, 2014, 07:25 AM
I like polymer and metal frames.

Glock specific problem: Side loading. This manifests as groups off to one side. I have been researching this problem and it is caused by side to side hand pressure. The Glock frame can be sensitive to this and requires consistent forward and back pressure on the grip. A friend of mine has been fighting this for a year. Unfortunately, the G19 is too large for his hands. I thought it was technique.

http://modernserviceweapons.com/?cat=11

batmann
July 21, 2014, 08:34 AM
I never gave the material much thought, until, like several others, I bought a Glock 22. My gun buying has never been the same.
Besides the Glock 22, I own a Walther PPS 9MM ( GREAT carry pistol and very Glock like), a Kahr CW .380 ACP and a Ruger SR22P. All polymer, all very light and easy to carry and all are extremely reliable, especially the Glock and the Walther.
While I love the look of blued steel and and nice grips, my Ruger Blackhawks have custom grips, the one pistol I would grab would be the Glock.

Fishbed77
July 21, 2014, 03:34 PM
I kind of cracks me up that, after 30 years, we are still discussing the merits of polymer-framed pistols.

I have often wished I could go back in time and put a Glock 17 in John Brownings hand and get his reaction.

If JMB had advanced polymers during his lifetime, he would have used them. He was an innovator that was not one to be tied down by convention.

kokapelli
July 21, 2014, 04:10 PM
The main reason for the poll is to see if there are any legitimate technical reasons to not own Polymer framed guns and based on the poll results there clearly is not.

Also based on the poll results the number of people that like Polymer guns way out numbers those that do not.

460Kodiak
July 21, 2014, 05:10 PM
I kind of cracks me up that, after 30 years, we are still discussing the merits of polymer-framed pistols.


Me too. Of course the 9mm vs 45 debate goes on. The forged vs cast debate goes on. The striker vs hammed debate continues. The DA/SA and SAO revolver goes on and on and on at times.

I think we as a gun community need some new topics to talk about.

tarosean
July 21, 2014, 05:49 PM
I think we as a gun community need some new topics to talk about.


What do you think we should talk about? No real inventions in at least 50 yrs. most tech dates back 100yrs.

460Kodiak
July 21, 2014, 06:32 PM
What do you think we should talk about? No real inventions in at least 50 yrs. most tech dates back 100yrs.

Oh, don't get me wrong. I didn't mean to imply that we shouldn't talk about these things anymore. They are still relevant conversations, especially as new shooters come to THR, but they have all started to sound the same. And you are totally correct, it's all old tech.

Let me restate my remark. I wish we as a gun community had some new topics to talk about.

kokapelli
July 21, 2014, 06:52 PM
Ok, I'm listening:)

farm23
July 21, 2014, 06:57 PM
I have never owned anything but 1911's but this weekend a grandson was married and we all got together before the wedding for some shooting. My son had his Glock and his wife had hers at the "shooting". My next may be a 30S.

460Kodiak
July 21, 2014, 08:07 PM
My statement was in response to Fishbed77's remark about how we're still talking about this after 30 years. My point was that we are still talking about a lot of things after a long time. And that's ok. The discussion of polymer use is still interesting and relevant.

Ok, I'm listening. I'll start a new thread and pm you when I come up with a good one. ;)

Hmmmm. How about..... Light and fast vs slow and heavy! Oh wait.....

BobWright
July 21, 2014, 09:02 PM
I don't like polymer handguns because they are ugly as a mud fence, don't take color case hardening nor high polish blueing.

They usually can't be dressed up with exotic hardwood or ivory grips. Have never seen one with a barrel as long as 7 1/2".

Bob Wright

45tex
July 21, 2014, 11:45 PM
The original Glock 17's had metal mag locks that grooved the cheap plastic magazines. But the mags did not fall out because a full load of ammo caused them to bulge so much.
There you go, a 30year old answer to a 30year old discussion. Except I was there and saw it. I own plastic guns today and don't give them a second thought.

armoredman
July 22, 2014, 01:30 AM
Same old stuff....hmmm...


So, do you think NiCad or Lithium Ion batteries are going to be the wave for coil style magnetic accelerator pistols in the future?

GrandmasterB
July 22, 2014, 01:36 AM
I REALLY LIKE this polymer gun.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q10/jotads/_MG_0017_zps600fd3bd.jpg

Spats McGee
July 22, 2014, 02:37 PM
I didn't like them for a long, long time. I finally got one after ~25 years, and I'm coming around to liking them. After a few years of carrying a full-sized steel pistol, I can't deny that my G19 is lighter and, hence, easier to carry. Is polymer pretty? No, there are a few (but not all) that are just as ugly as hammered sin. That said, just about everything I own is a little on the worn side. I call them "well-loved," and I guess I like 'em that way.

mgmorden
July 22, 2014, 04:40 PM
Love polymer guns myself. They're lighter, just as durable, cheaper, and IMHO look better (using polymer allows companies to mold in designs/patterns that would be prohibitively expensive to machine).

Don't get me wrong, I have plenty of metal framed auto-loaders too, its just that most of them are bought because they were classic designs that I wanted. Any new designs that come out it kinda puzzles me why a company would use anything but polymer.

maxxhavoc
July 22, 2014, 08:26 PM
You left "I dont really like or dislike them" from the poll.

100% of the guns in my safe and the guns that go to the range are metal. I enjoy collecting them, shooting them, and owning them.

I carry poly guns 95% of the time because they are light, just as reliable, and a rust spot, scuff, or holster wear on them doesn't even irritate me. Yes, the triggers all suck for target practice, but on a pistol without a decent thumb safety I prefer a stiff trigger pull. Especially since I know how light an 8lb trigger feels in stressful situations. In contrast, trying to make a striker pistol into a light-trigger target gun for range use to me is like taking your pickup to the track. Sure, you can mod it to make it something it isn't designed to be, but it compromises it's ability to do its intended task.

I expect the metal guns to outlive me and still look as good as when I bought them. If the plastics get too roughed up, I will buy another one. They are disposable. Better yet, I'll pass them on to a new shooter and recycle that plastic.

Drail
July 23, 2014, 08:44 AM
I never liked "disposable" tools.:scrutiny: (or top heavy pistols) A steel 1911 balances much better in my hand and has considerably less muzzle flip. But sadly most men have evolved into wimps today and cannot deal with the weight of an all steel pistol or the idea of a pistol that they can't just drop into their pocket because they can't deal with a real belt and holster rig. But they seem to have no problem dealing with the muzzle flip of a plastic gun that shoot small high velocity projectiles.

kokapelli
July 23, 2014, 08:59 AM
I never liked "disposable" tools.:scrutiny: (or top heavy pistols) A steel 1911 balances much better in my hand and has considerably less muzzle flip. But sadly most men have evolved into wimps today and cannot deal with the weight of an all steel pistol or the idea of a pistol that they can't just drop into their pocket because they can't deal with a real belt and holster rig. But they seem to have no problem dealing with the muzzle flip of a plastic gun that shoot small high velocity projectiles.
Wow! When I grow up I want to be just like you.:D

Drail
July 23, 2014, 09:12 AM
No, you really don't. Trust me.

huntsman
July 23, 2014, 10:44 AM
But sadly most men have evolved into wimps today and cannot deal with the weight of an all steel pistol or the idea of a pistol that they can't just drop into their pocket because they can't deal with a real belt and holster rig.

There's been a demand for pocket pistols long before the plastic craze so were these also lesser men?

I agree that the .45acp is at it's best coming out of and all steel gun. But going plastic isn't the only option in going lighter, one can always go to other JMB creations, a .32 or .380acp.

Fatelvis
July 24, 2014, 08:56 PM
I don't care for most polymer pistol's striker fired action. It makes for a springy trigger. I have learned on and have been using crisp breaking triggers for years, and the "glock type" trigger is a little hard to get used to.

dsk
July 25, 2014, 12:12 AM
I don't care much for polymer guns because I prefer fine machinery. I like car engines, racing cycles, power tools... basically anything made using machined steel or aluminum parts. Old-school guns like the 1911, Luger, SAA, and Pocket Hammerless were made from machined forgings precisely fitted to watch-like perfection. Modern polymer guns are admittedly a lot more practical in the real world, but being made of injection-molded plastic and pressed stampings means the things I admired about the old all-steel guns are missing from the equation. If you don't get what I'm talking about go examine a disassembled Luger sometime, you'll marvel at how all of those little parts were machined then carefully fitted together. There's no way to make them like that nowadays, at least not on a production level.

benzy2
July 25, 2014, 12:53 PM
The problem with this question is that the answers are always given back based on emotion, you can't reason with emotion.

I've had no function/accuracy issues from any polymer firearm I've used. I know of a handful of failures to feed that have happened when my father was shooting, though they happened with both steel and polymer framed guns (he tries to cause a malfunction, he just doesn't know it).

I like all firearms. Some I find more useful, or a better value, or more visually appealing. They all have a role and none are inherently bad. Some are made more precise and others a bit less. To qualify an entire segment of firearms as bad based on the material choice sounds like a decision based on emotion to me. Any individual option may or may not be the best fit for your selection, but the big name brands are offering a generally great functioning pistol at an affordable price.

CZ is about the only manufacturer that is making both a polymer and steel framed guns with the same general guts for the same general price. I grabbed both options and either could be justified over the other. If The big names produced a comparable featured steel or alloy framed pistol for $450-$550 I would be glad to own one as well. Sadly, most metal framed full sized guns these days run closer to the $1000 mark rather than the $500 mark.

250 Savage
July 25, 2014, 08:03 PM
Just think out loud here, but wouldn't polymer break down over time? I know some kinds really break down badly from UV, some get harder and more brittle with age. I imagine the companies that used polymer would have looked into this, but what kind of a time frame would that be?

Flatbush Harry
July 25, 2014, 08:25 PM
I have three, all SA XD. They have all worked totally reliably and show no wear after 5-700 rounds each. I trust them as much as either of my two 1911 duty pistols. I'll probably get an XD SC in .40 S&W or an XDs in .45ACP for summer carry one of these days, although at 6'1 220#, I don't have a problem concealing a full size 1911 under a loose shirt.

FH

kokapelli
July 25, 2014, 08:27 PM
That is probably true, but metal also eventually develops stress cracks and can break too over time.

I guess the question is which fails first?

I had the backstrap on a 347 pistol stretch to the point that the pistol was no longer useable, so metal has it's limitations too.

460Kodiak
July 25, 2014, 10:20 PM
Just think out loud here, but wouldn't polymer break down over time? I know some kinds really break down badly from UV, some get harder and more brittle with age. I imagine the companies that used polymer would have looked into this, but what kind of a time frame would that be?

I don't here of older GLOCKS spontaneously falling apart.

That is probably true, but metal also eventually develops stress cracks and can break too over time.true. My bet is on metal lasting longer. But I base that on nothing but a preference for metal guns, and the reality that there are many many old metal handguns still in service with maintenance of course.

Polymer handguns just haven't been around long enough to make it a fair comparison.

benzy2
July 25, 2014, 10:33 PM
The other consideration would be if a polymer gun costs half what a metal pistol costs (sig 2022 vs 226), even if it lasts half as long it may be a better value from a strictly length of service stand point. I would guess most well designed and manufactured steel firearms will last longer than a similarly well designed and manufactured polymer pistol. As of yet though, durability between the two doesn't seem drastic and the more popular brands haven't run into an expiration date, if you will.

BLU
July 26, 2014, 04:10 PM
I never use to like Tactical Tupperware. Then I shot a Glock. I will admit it shot great. I still don't like Tactical Tupperware. I can't dress up something that ugly by changing the grips or maybe jeweling the metal, etc. and unlike my steel guns, every Glock at the range looks just like every other Glock at the range! Wow! How boring. If I nick my steel gun, I carefully sand it out, polish it and you're hard pressed to know it ever happened. Nick a TT and it's there for life-unless you're good with a soldering iron. If, (God help me), my house burns down, at least I'll only have to replace, (maybe), the grips! Not everyone can afford a fire-proof safe! Oh... I never have to worry about the UV's degrading the integrity of the plastic either. And lastly... I doubt I ever have to worry about my 1911 breaking into two pieces the way one Border Patrol agent had his TT break when he fell on it. Go ahead and buy your TT's. I'm perfectly okay with it. Just don't waste your breath convincing me to buy one.

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