Who will storm the beaches of Normandy?


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Drjones
April 12, 2004, 03:10 PM
Mike S. Adams writes: (http://www.townhall.com/columnists/mikeadams/ma20040412.shtml)

It was a cool Saturday afternoon in the middle of August when I decided to ride into town to pick up something to read. It was my first visit to Brunswick, Maine and I had a few hours to kill before attending a wedding at Bowdoin College.

Just as I was pulling into a parking space on Main Street, I heard a man in a Volkswagen blow his horn at a Volvo that was in front of him. The man in the Volvo continued to back up until he bumped into the Volkswagen. The drivers of both cars were trying to get into the same parking space.

By the time I got out of my car, the man in the Volkswagen had jumped out of his car and was beating furiously on the driver’s side window of the Volvo. After calling the man a “dumb**s,” he asked him whether he realized that he was “too f***ing old to be driving.” He beat on the window again, demanding that the man get out of his car. A few seconds later, he realized that people were watching and he quietly slipped back into his Volkswagen. Moments later he found another parking space.

I walked over to the space where the man in the Volkswagen had parked and looked at his bumper. When he got out I said, “It looks like there’s no damage to your bumper after all.” He was one of those body-builder types who appeared to be in his early thirties. While obviously embarrassed, he still pretended to be victimized.

As I walked off towards the bookstore near the Bowdoin campus, I saw the man in the Volvo get out of his car. He had to lean against the door while he reached in the back seat to get his walking cane. He must have been eighty years old. Disgusted by the whole scene, I just shook my head and walked away.

After I picked up a magazine at the bookstore, I walked into a deli on Main Street to order some lunch. After I was finished eating, I was heading out the door when I noticed that the old man was sitting at a table for two in a corner by himself. I took a moment to go over to him and apologize for the behavior of the man in the Volkswagen. I told him that a man his age should never be treated so disrespectfully. The man just smiled and thanked me.

Before I walked away, I noticed that he had an embroidered hat sitting on the table in front of him. When I saw the writing on the hat, I realized that the man was a veteran of World War II. I had been feeling pretty proud of myself for trying to comfort him. But then it occurred to me that I should thank him for risking his life so that my generation could be free. Without him we might all be speaking German. Not to mention driving Volkswagens.

I was reminded of that incident last week when I was discussing the war in Iraq with my friend, Barry Whitehead. We both agreed that this nation would be in serious trouble if we had to fight another war like World War II today. That brave generation of men who stormed the beaches of Normandy has been replaced by a generation of metrosexuals trying to get in touch with their feminine side. Even the body builders become emotionally unraveled when they think that someone might have scratched their plastic bumper.

I am reminded of the spinelessness of my generation almost every day. With every column that I write and every speech that I give, people react by telling me that I should be careful lest I lose my job or be labeled by vindictive liberals.

Every time I hear such admonitions, I think about my grandfather who spent his 19th birthday getting trench foot in a foxhole in France in World War I. When he was finally able to crawl out, he was hit with a piece of shrapnel from a German hand grenade, which became permanently lodged in his spine. I can still see him in his later years walking across the room in a walker as a result of that injury. Come to think of it, he looked a lot like the man I saw getting out of that Volvo.

My parents took me to see my grandfather many times when I was a child. I got to hear the same war stories on every visit, but they never got old. We all need to take the time to hear these stories from our aging war heroes before they are gone for good.

The next time I see a World War II veteran sitting alone at a table for two, I hope I remember to thank him for his courage and sacrifice. Our injured veterans shouldn’t be driving around town by themselves. Nor should they be eating alone on a beautiful summer day.

They should be telling us about the battles that they won. They should be reminding us of all we have to lose.

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Lone_Gunman
April 12, 2004, 03:30 PM
Maybe the body builder was in Gulf War I.

Maybe the old guy was wearing someone elses embroidered WWII hat.

Maybe he really was too old to be driving.

This kind of improperly researched, nostalgic, overly patriotic drivel should not be taken as a reflection of this generation, or the last.

JoeSF
April 12, 2004, 03:41 PM
Thats a nice story. I understand the analogy. The intelligencia of 60's generation has spent much time trying to dismantle america and western civilization. Just take a look at what they call "history" in our public schools.

HBK
April 12, 2004, 03:44 PM
Still, we owe our WWII veterans an enormous debt of honor that I'm not sure we can repay. They just don't them like that anymore. Plus I think we can all agree that elders, especially that old, deserve respect instead of being treated like crap.
And as for history, the socialists have taken hold of that and are revising it as fast as they can.

BigG
April 12, 2004, 03:47 PM
Actually, I would like to see the French defend their own country for once. They can talk the talk. Let's see if they can walk the walk. :D

Drjones
April 12, 2004, 03:49 PM
I see both sides; sure there are lots of metrosexual p*ssies running around today, but I'm sure there were a few nancy boys in the 40s too.

And there is DEFINITELY something to be said for the men and women that make up our current @$$-kicking Armed Forces!!!

Lone_Gunman
April 12, 2004, 03:55 PM
Exactly, Drjones

People haven't really changed. When the times call for Men of Steel, then Men of Steel will be found.

To say they don't make them like that anymore insults the men serving today.

Drjones
April 12, 2004, 03:57 PM
The intelligencia of 60's generation has spent much time trying to dismantle america and western civilization.

Actually, that is their mission and they have accomplished a frightening amount.

Carlos
April 12, 2004, 03:59 PM
This kind of improperly researched, nostalgic, overly patriotic drivel should not be taken as a reflection of this generation, or the last.

Oh Please!! That is such nonsense. Tell me you don't see this kind of behavior yourself in your town. A large number of this this current generation of so-called adult is selfish, and quite frankly kids are NOT taught to respect their elders, like we were. That's a real shame. It's absolutely true.

I have seen the referenced behavior in my town and it sickens me.

FPrice
April 12, 2004, 03:59 PM
"Maybe the body builder was in Gulf War I."

Maybe he was, but that does not excuse his behavior.

"Maybe the old guy was wearing someone elses embroidered WWII hat."

Possibly, but not very likely. In any case it's rather a weak arguement. No way to prove it one way or the other. How many people would wear a hat like that unless they felt it was something right to do?

"Maybe he really was too old to be driving."

Do you have anything to back this up? I've seen quite a few older drivers who were still very good, and more than a few younger drivers who shouldn't be on the road at all. And by Drjones account the guy in back had a better view of what was going on and could have done more to avoid the accident.

"This kind of improperly researched, nostalgic, overly patriotic drivel should not be taken as a reflection of this generation, or the last."

Kinda strikes home, doesn't it? Unfortunately there are far too many examples of both generations to discount what Drjones has to say.

HBK
April 12, 2004, 04:02 PM
I guess you're right, but it is hard to compare armed forces then and now. We have so much better technology now. The heart of an AMerican should be the same though.

Drjones
April 12, 2004, 04:05 PM
Uh....FPrice....I didn't write that article, just so you know.

I wish I had!

:)

Sean Smith
April 12, 2004, 04:05 PM
Do you have anything to back this up?

The fact that he hit somebody's car while trying to park? ;)

JoeSF
April 12, 2004, 04:15 PM
I have somthing to back it up.

What the 60's generation thinks to teach our kids..

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2004/3/24/93948.shtml

here is an excerpt..
The textbooks favored by many multiculturalists ignore the importance of Western Civilization in areas such as religious tolerance, individual liberty, democratic institutions and the rule of law. Their flat-out disregard for Western Civilization allows textbooks to be used in schools such as the one in a New Mexico school district called "500 Years of Chicano History in Pictures" that was "written in response to the Bicentennial celebration of the 1776 American Revolution and its lies."

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2004/3/24/93948.shtml


As far as having good brave soldiers today, no question about it.

FPrice
April 12, 2004, 04:21 PM
"Uh....FPrice....I didn't write that article, just so you know."

Yeah, I know. But you posted it so you get some of the credit.

FPrice
April 12, 2004, 04:28 PM
"The fact that he hit somebody's car while trying to park?"

My wife hit somebody's car while backing up. She's 40. Try telling HER she's too old to drive. I've seen many other people have accidents or near accidents while trying to back up. Are all of them too old to drive?

Backing up is inherently more difficult than going forward ("The drivers of both cars were trying to get into the same parking space.").

I'm really not trying to bust on YOU. It was the original comment that I thought was a bit off the mark.

R.H. Lee
April 12, 2004, 04:44 PM
The WWII generation truly deserves our respect and gratitude. They stoically went through a great depression, fought and won a world war on two fronts, and returned home to issue in the greatest REAL prosperity this country has ever seen. As did the founding fathers, they set a great example for us.

Unfortunately, we as a nation have failed to appreciate the value of what they gave us. We have allowed our nation, language and our culture to be diluted and perverted in the name of "multicultural diversity" and "political correctness". (from Rosie the Riveter to Rosie O'Donnell in one generation)

There are many among us who are 'ashamed' to be Americans. They are eager to bob their empty heads in agreement with the prevailing Europeon notion that America is aggressive, imperialistic, and responsible for the troubles of the world.

This has not come about overnight. Since WWII our enemies, both within and without, have been feverishly busy obliterating knowledge of our past, revising history and repeating lies often enough for them to be accepted as fact.

It used to mean something to be an American, no matter where you came from. Now, instead of being Americans first, we are [insert ethnicity here]-Americans. We have allowed the left to divide us into squabbling groups seeking government to represent our individual interests. We have allowed the insidious repetition of lies to make all sorts extreme perversities seem mainstream, and to convince us that we are a nation of victims who cannot operate without an increasingly intrusive central bureacracy.

Don't get me started................

agricola
April 12, 2004, 04:49 PM
Every generation believes, to a certain extent, that its unworthy of its forebears and their glorious deeds. They all find out that, in the end, they usually are the equal of those that have gone before.

Riley, for every Rosie O'Donnell there are thousands of Michelle Witmers.

Lone_Gunman
April 12, 2004, 04:49 PM
Riley, while your comments about diversity, multi-culturalism, and political correctness may well be true, what exactly do they have to do with 2 white guys having an argument over parking?

FPrice, I was presenting possible explanations for the behaviour described by the author other than the view point he presented. He has no more validation of his perspective than I do of mine. I think the article was written from a biased standpoint.

R.H. Lee
April 12, 2004, 04:56 PM
agricola- who is Michelle Witmers?

Lone_Gunman-yeah, I got carried away. I have fits sometimes:uhoh:

agricola
April 12, 2004, 05:02 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/Northeast/04/12/sister.soldiers.ap/index.html

R.H. Lee
April 12, 2004, 05:10 PM
God bless her! even if her purpose for enlisting was to obtain an education.

Which brings me to another point-why the hell did we call a cease fire in Fallujah when we had almost won? Does that mean that those Marines and Infantrymen and women who lost their lives taking ground died in vain when that same ground has to be retaken at the cost of more lives? What the hell is with a 'compassionate military' as quoted by a Marine commander?

Which gets me back on topic. In WWII we went in to WIN, and we did. Now we seem to be more interested in not offending those of other religions........***?:confused:

JPL
April 12, 2004, 05:12 PM
I can not think of a reason why Europe should be saved again.

If Germany takes over France, or Russia sweeps the entire continent, they're welcome to it.

FPrice
April 12, 2004, 05:23 PM
"FPrice, I was presenting possible explanations for the behaviour described by the author other than the view point he presented."

Yes, and I merely pointed out that these other possible explanations were rather weak. I still fail to see a (good) rationale for the "bodybuilders" behavior.

"He has no more validation of his perspective than I do of mine. I think the article was written from a biased standpoint."

One man's bias is another's dislike. The author supported his viewpoint much more than you have.

Sorry for pointing that out.

cdbeaver
April 12, 2004, 06:30 PM
If you really want to thank a veteran for his service, perhaps you might want to visit a Veterans Administration hospital. The place is filled with men and women who fought--and some nearly died--for their country. I know they'd appreciate a friendly handshake.

I'll be going to one next week for treatment, and I'm sure I'll see a lot of comrades, though I probably won't know their names.

Lone_Gunman
April 12, 2004, 07:16 PM
No cdbeaver, its much easier to wax philosophical about how much better the last generation was than this one, than to actually try to do something for them.

Man, what were you thinking?

Moparmike
April 12, 2004, 09:58 PM
Even the body builders become emotionally unraveled when they think that someone might have scratched their plastic bumper.Umm, I would get pissed off if my bumper was hit by another driver too. No matter if they were 18 or 80. Would I start banging on crap? No. Would I mutter a few choice words while waiting for the person to get out and exchange info (if it was bad enough)? Yes.


That being said, I am very grateful that people served my country, and the bodybuilder in this case needs some people skills.

Khornet
April 13, 2004, 08:12 AM
well said.

http://www.americasvoices.org/avarc2001/archives2001/BowenM/BowenM_100401.htm

Devonai
April 13, 2004, 09:27 AM
I've been in several fender-benders that were all the other person's fault. Each time it happened I took a deep breath before exiting the vehicle to exchange information, saying to myself, "be exceedingly polite, you don't know how this person is going to react." Road rage incidents and the fact that I was armed each time weighed heavily on my mind.

One time was an elderly gentleman whose rear window was completely fogged over, backing up on a one-way street for a parking space fifty yards past where we were. I waited for him to pass me before backing out of my own space, needless to say I was a bit surprised when he threw it into reverse and hit me. Knowing that there was no way his insurance wouldn't pay for the small dent in my car, I was nice to him. After exchanging information, he said, "I can't believe how polite you are, when I saw you were a young guy I was expecting a hard time." I said, "let the insurance companies argue over what happened, you and I don't need to get into it."

People treat their cars way too seriously sometimes.

c_yeager
April 13, 2004, 09:46 AM
When i was 16 i changed lanes right into some scary looking dude's el camino. He was big and hairy and mean looking. He turned out to be one of the nicest fellows ive met on the street. He was really concerned with making sure that i was OK.

On a side note that old piece of detroit iron cut through my Geo Metro like a warm knife through butter. He got a flat tire while the port side of my car folded itself over the hood. I was impressed.

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