? What years were "pre-RemMarlington" Marlin lever rifles? Model '92 in .357


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200Apples
October 17, 2014, 01:02 AM
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Ever since I shot a (recently-manufactured) .357 ReMarlington lever, I've wanted one for my own. I have a line on a "pre-ReMarlington" Marlin Model [Edit" Model '94] in .357 that appears to be in fine condition save for a couple bad knicks in the forend furniture. Saddle-ring, side-eject. I put a deposit on it.

[Edit: 10-17-12

I visited the rifle today at my local gun shop. It was indeed mislabeled. With my limited knowledge of most leverguns, I thought I'd stumbled onto something even "neater" than it is. I have a Win '94 in .30WCF, been wanting a '92, but it looks like I'll have to have it in a Winchester. Meanwhile, I'm going ahead with the purchase of this Marlin, 'cause I've also wanted a .357-chambered lever carbine.]

What can the Marlin lever cognoscenti tell me? Thank you very much! in advance.

:-)

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WestKentucky
October 17, 2014, 01:07 AM
They are hardish to find for a reasonable price. I have seen them in similar condition to what you describe with 700 bucks on the pricetag.

DPris
October 17, 2014, 01:10 AM
Not a 92, for one.
It'd be an 1894 if Marlin .357.

The pre-Rem cutoff is not an absolute guarantee, QC was going noticeably downhill the lest year or so before the Rem takeover.

If old enough, should be a nice gun.
Mine is over 10, very fond of it.

Some will cycle .38s, some won't.

Some will develop the lifter problem that causes unreliable cycling with .357s, most won't.

Keep the lever screw & the one in front of it tight, or you'll probably induce malfunctions.
Denis

200Apples
October 17, 2014, 09:07 PM
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DPris/Denis is correct. The carbine had been mislabeled. See first post.

Going ahead with the purchase anyway, because a .357 lever carbine is a rifle I've wanted for a couple of years.

I'd love to hear more experiences with this make, model and chambering. Thanks again!


:-)

Gordon
October 17, 2014, 09:25 PM
First year for the 1894 .357 was 1979 , I bought one that year and my son still has it it feeds .38 spls very well except full wadcutters. I think in 1985 they started putting on cross bolt safeties and those guns are not quite as nicely finished as the earlier ones IIMHO.

LocoGringo
October 18, 2014, 02:51 AM
Remington's takeover of Marlin was in 2011, so rifles made before 2011 would be "pure" Marlin. Not sure about other models, but I've been looking at Marlin 1894 rifles in 45-70 and the Pre-Remington Marlins command a premium and also have a proof mark of "JM" on the barrels.

Lafitte
October 18, 2014, 08:31 AM
1894 chambered for 45/70?? Check again, I think it would be a 1895. Quiet different from an 1894.

Lafitte

Rodman579
October 18, 2014, 09:33 AM
if you look on the barrel and it has a JM stamp then its not a Remlin. making one run with 38s is not difficult at all, but wacutters or semi-wadcutters are never going to feed reliably in a lever action rifle because of the sharp shoulder of the bullet. i have worked on a ton of Marlins as i tune guns for CAS. i have worked on several Remlins, they all had more tooling marks internally and took more work to get them to run correctly but all turned out ready to go.

1madss
October 18, 2014, 11:07 PM
I have a 1894 in 357 that has a SN that starts with 22. Maybe just a very early 1979 gun, but I'm happy that it does run RN and SWC 38s no problem.

Where is the SN on the gun? Tang or side of the receiver. I don't recall off the top of my head when that changed, but it was far before the buy out/factory move. A gun with the SN on the tang pretty much guaranteed to be a JM gun. Apparently the years close to the factory move are very hard to ID. I was quite happy to score a early gun so it was a non-issue for me.

Head over to Marlinowners.com and you will learn volumes on how to ID a JM vs Remlin gun.

RainDodger
October 18, 2014, 11:30 PM
You're gonna love a carbine in .357. I ended up with a Uberti '73 in .357 and it's a gem to shoot. I think it's a really fun caliber in a lever action.

Vince45
October 19, 2014, 09:09 AM
I have a 357 Marlin 94 bought new in circa 2002 , its a gem will never sell it , shoots 38 semi wad cutters fine and handloaded with the Hornady 158 grain XTP projectile is effective on pigs and small deer breeds Fallow / Whitetail to 100 yards . Mine has a Burris 2x7 which is ideal .

LocoGringo
October 19, 2014, 11:53 PM
1894 chambered for 45/70?? Check again, I think it would be a 1895. Quiet different from an 1894.

Lafitte
Yep, you're right. I used to have an 1894 in .45 colt for Cowboy Action and that's the number that popped into my head. It's hard to keep all the numbers straight...

stonecoldy
October 20, 2014, 12:23 AM
Best place is to go to "MarlinOwners" forum, you will find all of the info you need on the 1894C there.

200Apples
October 20, 2014, 03:33 AM
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Thanks again, everyone.

Say, I just clicked onto Marlinowners dot com's forum index page and immediately, Microsoft Security Essentials went into red flag mode.

Don't have time tonight to sort it all out and I've a busy schedule the next two days, so... I'll get back over to M.Owners soon as.

The carbine is on layway; I expect to be able to start the paperwork in a week or two, beginning that wonderful 10-day wait to bring this home.

Cheers!


:-)

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