Adams Arms ARs


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Lycidas Janwor
August 13, 2015, 12:16 PM
Anyone have an opinion on Adams Arms AR rifles? Are they any good and is their gas-piston system reliable? Buds Gun Shop is running a special on their base model for $629 and I might get one just to get one at that price.

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plinker8
August 13, 2015, 01:05 PM
I have seen in my reading that their piston system is very reliable and is extremely clean and requires less maintenance per-say. I know of a few people converting their rifles with their piston system.

Jackal
August 13, 2015, 02:17 PM
I have an AR I converted to their piston setup. While there is little to no tangible benefit of the piston system, its just kinda neat. It weighs more and recoils more than a DI rifle. Bottom line: Dont buy one thinking that its "better" than a direct impingement rifle. Its just different.

carbine85
August 13, 2015, 06:09 PM
I don't have one but all the reviews I have read are favorable. As stated above I don't think there is any major benefit unless you hate cleaning

Lycidas Janwor
August 13, 2015, 10:18 PM
I'd buy one for one simple reason: the price.

DavesNotHere!
October 31, 2015, 10:25 AM
Anyone have an opinion on Adams Arms AR rifles? Are they any good and is their gas-piston system reliable? Buds Gun Shop is running a special on their base model for $629 and I might get one just to get one at that price.

I bought one, it's my first AR, first time handling a .223 since mid 70's at Lackland AFB. I have a VZ2008 bought cheap, and like the gas piston operation. When considering my first AR, it wasn't hard for me to look at piston over DI as I'm already familiar.

Saw the AA15 on Bud's and while a bit more than I wanted to spend, I found it compelling. It's going to get used and abused so the blem just meant more $ for ammo (actually dies and brass and bullets). Couldn't find a scratch. 1st time out got .7 and .6" groups at 100 yards with Fiocci Sierra 77gr HPBTs!!! Did not expect that.

I've worked up a load for Hornady 75gr and about to do the same for Nosler and Sierra 77gr HPBTs.

I went cheap on the scope, fore grip and grip are Magpul MOE (SL on the front) and got their trigger guard part as well as the straight steel irritated my finger.

The trigger is heavier than I'd like but better than I expected. Can't see spending big for better just yet. Didn't like the slop between upper and lower so shimmed with aluminum furnace tape the installer left behind, used some on the buffer tube to take up slack in the butt stock as well.

I'm not a bit disappointed in the Adam's Arms basic carbine @ $629. I don't think I'll wear it out, but keep thinking a 20" stainless upper would be really nice....

Enjoy your decision, I know I am!

dragon813gt
October 31, 2015, 10:33 AM
I have one of their complete uppers. I paid more for it then what they are now selling a complete rifle for. And I didn't buy anywhere close to the peak.

It's run flawlessly since the first round. It keeps everything a lot cleaner. I like the adjustable gas block. Makes it nice and easy to make a single shot for bench work.

KBintheSLC
February 23, 2016, 06:52 PM
I have an AR I converted to their piston setup. While there is little to no tangible benefit of the piston system, its just kinda neat. It weighs more and recoils more than a DI rifle. Bottom line: Dont buy one thinking that its "better" than a direct impingement rifle. Its just different.
Not sure about "little to no tangible benefit", but I definitely like not having black filth blasted into my action. I spent too much time scrubbing my M16 while in the service... life is too short. I love my Adams piston build. I could never go back to impingement. It works great on top of an Anderson MFG lower. 100% reliable from day one.

Here is a review with more details: https://armory.adiga.co/2014/12/20/adams-arms-piston-upper/

Impingement might have some advantages in accuracy. So, if you are a low-volume bench-rest precision shooter, it has some merit. Also, for a select-fire or full-auto platform, the classic design might be preferable. For all other practical purposes, the piston is the way to go.

meanmrmustard
February 23, 2016, 07:05 PM
The main thing that keeps me away from piston driven ARs is that it houses proprietary parts. I can't swap bolts from a DI to a piston and back, vice versa.

Screwball
February 23, 2016, 07:19 PM
The main thing that keeps me away from piston driven ARs is that it houses proprietary parts. I can't swap bolts from a DI to a piston and back, vice versa.


You very well can swap bolts between the two... carriers are different, but when the chips are down, how many times has someone broken a carrier? The key would be the one part to worry about, and the Adams Arms carrier doesn't need one (mine has a tab milled with the carrier to interact with the rod).

I keep an extra bolt (the Adams Arms kit uses a bolt spring, which I have an extra), firing pin, cam pin, and retainer pin in my grip. If I needed to rebuild the bolt group (again, carrier likely will be fine), can do it very easily.

HammsBeer
February 24, 2016, 02:40 AM
I have an AA (Huldra) and it runs %100. It has gas settings for full, suppressed, or off. It's a bit front heavy, but the recoil impulse is on par with my midlength DI gun. As far as proprietary parts, there is the gas plug in the gas block, the op rod, and the bolt carrier has an integral machined strike face where the gas key would be. Uses a standard bolt. No sign of carrier tilt wear. I like it, and I like DI too. If you check out Huldra Arms they often run really good sales on complete rifles or uppers.

meanmrmustard
February 24, 2016, 04:42 AM
You very well can swap bolts between the two... carriers are different, but when the chips are down, how many times has someone broken a carrier? The key would be the one part to worry about, and the Adams Arms carrier doesn't need one (mine has a tab milled with the carrier to interact with the rod).

I keep an extra bolt (the Adams Arms kit uses a bolt spring, which I have an extra), firing pin, cam pin, and retainer pin in my grip. If I needed to rebuild the bolt group (again, carrier likely will be fine), can do it very easily.
You're doing this during a range trip, in the middle of a training session, or a firefight?

Screwball
February 24, 2016, 07:02 AM
You're doing this during a range trip, in the middle of a training session, or a firefight?


Doing it whenever you need to get the rifle running again... it isn't that hard to do. It's not like you need to change out the barrel, with specialty tools.

If your in a firefight, you are going to tell me you are going to have a spare bolt group at the ready to swap out? Because if my rifle went down, I'm pulling a handgun. Even if that was the case, what's stopping someone from purchasing another AA bolt group?

I just purchased a D/I .45 upper, which I brought to the range the other day. Within 30 rounds, the bolt started sticking very bad. Had a spare bolt, so swapped it out and got it running for an extra 8 rounds before the same occurred. The builder used a one-piece gas ring on both bolts, which turned out to be the culprit (when heated up, caused drag on the bolt's rotation), but to change out the bolt wasn't an impossible task.

DeepSouth
February 24, 2016, 07:33 AM
I had one and never had any problems with it. I eventually sold it because it was an AR and they just don't anything for me, as much as wanted to like them I just at can't seem to.

meanmrmustard
February 24, 2016, 09:19 AM
Doing it whenever you need to get the rifle running again... it isn't that hard to do. It's not like you need to change out the barrel, with specialty tools.

If your in a firefight, you are going to tell me you are going to have a spare bolt group at the ready to swap out? Because if my rifle went down, I'm pulling a handgun. Even if that was the case, what's stopping someone from purchasing another AA bolt group?

I just purchased a D/I .45 upper, which I brought to the range the other day. Within 30 rounds, the bolt started sticking very bad. Had a spare bolt, so swapped it out and got it running for an extra 8 rounds before the same occurred. The builder used a one-piece gas ring on both bolts, which turned out to be the culprit (when heated up, caused drag on the bolt's rotation), but to change out the bolt wasn't an impossible task.
I do, actually, carry spare BCGs. As they're cheap these days, I carry spares in BOB, range bag, as well as gas rings, extractors, and firing pins.

.375
February 25, 2016, 03:12 PM
I have an upper for sale in the accessories section. It's under the Huldra Arms brand. It doesn't like steel ammo.

Screwball
February 26, 2016, 11:17 AM
I do, actually, carry spare BCGs. As they're cheap these days, I carry spares in BOB, range bag, as well as gas rings, extractors, and firing pins.


Ok... still don't understand how it being in a BOB or range bag is going to help you in a firefight, which you specifically made mention of when you quoted my original point.

Range is less of an issue, as there is nobody shooting at you (gave my example of my .45 AR at the range). Training class, stuff breaks... which is why I'd definitely have another rifle, just in case. Training not only improves your skill, but it tests your gear. If something breaks, either you need to reevaluate your choices or improve/prepare for that issue (for example, rebuilding/replacing your bolt at X rounds; X being prior to where your failure occurred, to prevent it from happening).

I view a bolt as an individual part. If something goes in it (gas ring, extractor, ejector; in regards to gas rings, not ran on an AA system), I swap the entire bolt out of the carrier. Considering the spare is usually new, the likelihood of two bolt failures within the amount of ammo I would conceivably run through my AR in any serious situation (it isn't a SAW) is right next to nothing. You lower the failure rate even more with preventive maintenance. That bolt I have is for the "oh, s***" scenario.

Carrier failures can happen, but I'd put more emphasis on the gas key being the failure point than the carrier itself. That is why I don't keep a spare, especially with the design of the AA carrier. A carrier won't fit in my grip, so it isn't as easy to put it somewhere that I could access it if I need it.

meanmrmustard
February 27, 2016, 12:09 AM
Ok... still don't understand how it being in a BOB or range bag is going to help you in a firefight, which you specifically made mention of when you quoted my original point.

Range is less of an issue, as there is nobody shooting at you (gave my example of my .45 AR at the range). Training class, stuff breaks... which is why I'd definitely have another rifle, just in case. Training not only improves your skill, but it tests your gear. If something breaks, either you need to reevaluate your choices or improve/prepare for that issue (for example, rebuilding/replacing your bolt at X rounds; X being prior to where your failure occurred, to prevent it from happening).

I view a bolt as an individual part. If something goes in it (gas ring, extractor, ejector; in regards to gas rings, not ran on an AA system), I swap the entire bolt out of the carrier. Considering the spare is usually new, the likelihood of two bolt failures within the amount of ammo I would conceivably run through my AR in any serious situation (it isn't a SAW) is right next to nothing. You lower the failure rate even more with preventive maintenance. That bolt I have is for the "oh, s***" scenario.

Carrier failures can happen, but I'd put more emphasis on the gas key being the failure point than the carrier itself. That is why I don't keep a spare, especially with the design of the AA carrier. A carrier won't fit in my grip, so it isn't as easy to put it somewhere that I could access it if I need it.
You're reading too much into it. I stated several places I happen to store bolts and carriers, and you're focusing on one only.

Fact of the matter is, I can go to my LGS or any of my family or friends and swap bolts from ARs in any event needed, no matter the situation, shot at or not. No one, and I mean no one that I shoot with locally has a piston AR. My LGS doesn't have any keys for them, and last I looked (2-26-16) they didn't even have a piston rifle on the rack. There's more to the piston AR than just a carrier, and the lack of parts availability locally is a huge caveat for me.

Fact of the matter is, while the entry level Adams rifle is tempting at its current price point, there is no inherent benefit of piston ARs.

So in summation, $629 for the Adams is a good price. Its also a good price for many other entry level, traditional AR15s that are lighter and more user friendly.

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