Man shot in his apartment by police hopes for justice


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atek3
April 26, 2004, 04:58 AM
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/2004/04/07/news/local/states/pennsylvania/counties/bucks_county/8373087.htm?1c

talk about depressing.

Ohh and this just in...the officer won't be charged or punished.


atek3

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4570Rick
April 26, 2004, 05:15 AM
For those here who are or were in Law Enforcement, or who support same, I would not want to live in a world without Police. That being said, these Philly cops qualify as JBT's.:cuss:

d-mac
April 26, 2004, 10:50 AM
.

Chip Dixon
April 26, 2004, 10:57 AM
jack booted thugs..

glocksman
April 26, 2004, 11:02 AM
Would someone repost the article?

The site requires registration and I get enough spam already.

d-mac
April 26, 2004, 11:05 AM
Thanks

TarpleyG
April 26, 2004, 11:55 AM
what glocksman said...please

Carlos
April 26, 2004, 12:27 PM
JBTs indeed, especially my favorite guy who said something like:

... STFU, you'll be fine!

Ya, Pal, naked man was a real threat. :fire:

Jadecristal
April 26, 2004, 12:47 PM
Man shot in his apartment by police hopes for justice

He was not the target of the raid in Feb. that cost him a leg. The Bucks County D.A. is investigating.

By Larry King

Inquirer Staff Writer

The violence that cost James Hoskins his left leg was instantaneous. Yet two months later, the young Levittown man still struggles to comprehend it.

Hoskins, 22, was naked and unarmed when a Middletown police detective shot him Feb. 6 in the bedroom of his apartment during a drug raid.

Neither Hoskins nor his girlfriend, who was in the bedroom with him, was the target of the afternoon raid. The Bucks County District Attorney's Office is investigating the shooting.

"Hopefully, they will say this was a crime," Hoskins said yesterday in his first public remarks since the shooting. "Hopefully, they will make the right decision."

A lawyer representing Middletown Township and Dale Keddie Jr., the officer who shot Hoskins, declined to comment specifically on the case. He did say that Keddie remains on active duty.

"We're not going to try the case in the press," attorney Joseph Santerone said. "We will wait for the district attorney to reach a decision."

Hoskins spoke to reporters from his bed at St. Mary Medical Center, where he has been since the shooting. He spent several weeks in a medically induced coma and has undergone more than 30 operations for leg and abdominal injuries.

On Feb. 24, surgeons were forced to amputate his left leg at mid-thigh.

Hoskins did not know his leg was gone, or that it was a police officer who shot him, until weeks later. He was still semi-coherent when doctors decided to sit him up in bed, but his mother intervened.

"I said, 'No, I have to tell him before he sees it,' " Debbie Hoskins said. She said she took his hand, told him that his leg was gone, that a lot of things had happened to him, but that he was going to live.

"I said, 'Give me a squeeze if you understand what Mommy is trying to tell you.' And he started to cry and gave me a squeeze," she said.

James Hoskins said the news surprised him, because he had been feeling "ghost pains," as though his leg were still there. "It was hard for both of us; we were both crying," he said.

As his condition improved, Hoskins said, he learned that the apartment intruders he had taken for robbers were actually police officers.

"I couldn't believe it, that police officers would act in such a way," he said.

Police from Middletown and two other departments were serving a search warrant targeting Hoskins' brother, David, who shared the apartment.

David Hoskins, 20, has a history of drug arrests and at least one conviction. He was in the living room when police entered. Officers arrested him after finding a small amount of marijuana, a glass pipe and $622, police said.

In the locked bedroom, Jim Hoskins and his girlfriend, Valerie Custer, 25, of Philadelphia, were lounging in bed, watching TV. "General Hospital," Hoskins said with a chuckle. "It wasn't my choice."

He recalled being startled by "a loud thud. It sounded like something came crashing down off a shelf." He said he got up to investigate, bunching a T-shirt over his genitals as he reached to open the door.

At the same instant, he said, a man in street clothes pushed his way in. Hoskins said he turned instinctively to his left, "and then a gun went off."

He said the officer had said nothing and never identified himself. "I kind of thought my house was being robbed," he said. "He didn't have anything on that said police."

The shot staggered him, Hoskins said, but he remained standing. "I turned to the guy and said, 'I don't deserve this... . Why'd you do this to me? I didn't do anything wrong."

The bullet had torn through his stomach, small intestine and colon before lodging in his leg.

Bleeding heavily and short of breath, he lowered himself onto the bed. "I said, 'Am I going to die?' He said, 'Shut the... up; you'll be fine.' "

Hoskins said he recalled a second man placing a compress against his wound before he was carried out on a stretcher. He remembered his girlfriend screaming, but nothing else that was said.

"At that point, I was only worried about living," he said. "I really wasn't paying attention to anything else around me."

When he arrived at St. Mary, Hoskins "was basically out of blood," his grandfather Fritz Wagner said. "He was very close to death."

Doylestown lawyer Thomas Mellon Jr. recently filed a federal civil rights lawsuit on behalf of Hoskins and Custer. Mellon said the police records he has reviewed showed no "necessity for them to come in with their guns drawn."

Before the shooting, Hoskins had been working two jobs - full time as a supervisor at a Newtown nursery and landscape business, and part time as a service station cashier.

Hoskins, who has no arrest record, agreed to let his brother move in with him last fall, hoping to be a positive influence.

Asked whether he was angry with his brother over the shooting, Hoskins was told by Mellon not to answer. "He is a very different person from his brother," Mellon said.

For now, Hoskins, a graduate of Neshaminy High School, labors three hours a day in physical therapy sessions.

In a blue T-shirt and gray athletic shorts, he winced slightly as he shifted in his bed, but he spoke with good humor. He joked that he wanted to drink a beer and eat some chicken upon his discharge.

"My plans haven't changed," he said. "I still want to be a successful person, and to have a nice family. That much hasn't changed."

atek3
April 26, 2004, 12:48 PM
April 7, 2004 - The Philadelphia Inquirer (PA)
Man Shot In His Apartment By Police Hopes For Justice
He Was Not The Target Of The Raid In Feb. That Cost Him A Leg. The Bucks County D.A. Is Investigating.
By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Return to Drug War News: Don't Miss Archive

The violence that cost James Hoskins his left leg was instantaneous. Yet two months later, the young Levittown man still struggles to comprehend it.

Hoskins, 22, was naked and unarmed when a Middletown police detective shot him Feb. 6 in the bedroom of his apartment during a drug raid.

Neither Hoskins nor his girlfriend, who was in the bedroom with him, was the target of the afternoon raid. The Bucks County District Attorney's Office is investigating the shooting.

"Hopefully, they will say this was a crime," Hoskins said yesterday in his first public remarks since the shooting. "Hopefully, they will make the right decision."

A lawyer representing Middletown Township and Dale Keddie Jr., the officer who shot Hoskins, declined to comment specifically on the case. He did say that Keddie remains on active duty.

"We're not going to try the case in the press," attorney Joseph Santerone said. "We will wait for the district attorney to reach a decision."

Hoskins spoke to reporters from his bed at St. Mary Medical Center, where he has been since the shooting. He spent several weeks in a medically induced coma and has undergone more than 30 operations for leg and abdominal injuries.

On Feb. 24, surgeons were forced to amputate his left leg at mid-thigh.

Hoskins did not know his leg was gone, or that it was a police officer who shot him, until weeks later. He was still semi-coherent when doctors decided to sit him up in bed, but his mother intervened.

"I said, 'No, I have to tell him before he sees it,'" Debbie Hoskins said. She said she took his hand, told him that his leg was gone, that a lot of things had happened to him, but that he was going to live.

"I said, 'Give me a squeeze if you understand what Mommy is trying to tell you.' And he started to cry and gave me a squeeze," she said.

James Hoskins said the news surprised him, because he had been feeling "ghost pains," as though his leg were still there. "It was hard for both of us; we were both crying," he said.

As his condition improved, Hoskins said, he learned that the apartment intruders he had taken for robbers were actually police officers.

"I couldn't believe it, that police officers would act in such a way," he said.

Police from Middletown and two other departments were serving a search warrant targeting Hoskins' brother, David, who shared the apartment.

David Hoskins, 20, has a history of drug arrests and at least one conviction. He was in the living room when police entered. Officers arrested him after finding a small amount of marijuana, a glass pipe and $622, police said.

In the locked bedroom, Jim Hoskins and his girlfriend, Valerie Custer, 25, of Philadelphia, were lounging in bed, watching TV. "General Hospital," Hoskins said with a chuckle. "It wasn't my choice."

He recalled being startled by "a loud thud. It sounded like something came crashing down off a shelf." He said he got up to investigate, bunching a T-shirt over his genitals as he reached to open the door.

At the same instant, he said, a man in street clothes pushed his way in. Hoskins said he turned instinctively to his left, "and then a gun went off."

He said the officer had said nothing and never identified himself. "I kind of thought my house was being robbed," he said. "He didn't have anything on that said police."

The shot staggered him, Hoskins said, but he remained standing. "I turned to the guy and said, 'I don't deserve this... . Why'd you do this to me? I didn't do anything wrong."

The bullet had torn through his stomach, small intestine and colon before lodging in his leg.

Bleeding heavily and short of breath, he lowered himself onto the bed. "I said, 'Am I going to die?' He said, 'Shut the... up; you'll be fine.' "

Hoskins said he recalled a second man placing a compress against his wound before he was carried out on a stretcher. He remembered his girlfriend screaming, but nothing else that was said.

"At that point, I was only worried about living," he said. "I really wasn't paying attention to anything else around me."

When he arrived at St. Mary, Hoskins "was basically out of blood," his grandfather Fritz Wagner said. "He was very close to death."

Doylestown lawyer Thomas Mellon Jr. recently filed a federal civil rights lawsuit on behalf of Hoskins and Custer. Mellon said the police records he has reviewed showed no "necessity for them to come in with their guns drawn."

Before the shooting, Hoskins had been working two jobs - full time as a supervisor at a Newtown nursery and landscape business, and part time as a service station cashier.

Hoskins, who has no arrest record, agreed to let his brother move in with him last fall, hoping to be a positive influence.

Asked whether he was angry with his brother over the shooting, Hoskins was told by Mellon not to answer. "He is a very different person from his brother," Mellon said.

For now, Hoskins, a graduate of Neshaminy High School, labors three hours a day in physical therapy sessions.

In a blue T-shirt and gray athletic shorts, he winced slightly as he shifted in his bed, but he spoke with good humor. He joked that he wanted to drink a beer and eat some chicken upon his discharge.

"My plans haven't changed," he said. "I still want to be a successful person, and to have a nice family. That much hasn't changed."

HBK
April 26, 2004, 12:53 PM
The very definition of JBTs. :barf:

Daniel T
April 26, 2004, 01:10 PM
I'm sure he deserved it. He was obviously clutching a deadly weapon. Who are we to judge; we weren't there.

glocksman
April 26, 2004, 01:17 PM
You know karma's a b-tch and perhaps Officer Keddie will suffer the same fate.

One can hope, anyway. :evil:

nero45acp
April 26, 2004, 01:29 PM
More "collateral damage" in the "war on drugs".:( I have to wonder which is harming our society more?
Johnny or Jane smoking grass or cops busting down doors and shooting innocent people?
(not to mention assest confiscation without due process)

I bet the founding fathers are spinning in their graves! :uhoh:


nero

Coronach
April 26, 2004, 01:30 PM
Hmmm.

An article that is completely based on the statements of the individual who was shot.

Hmmm.

And yet people state with certainty that there was JBThuggery involved. The willingness of the posters on THR to go out on limb to decide that the police did wrong never ceases to amaze.

Good shoot? Bad shoot? Could be either. You sure cannot tell from this.

Mike

glocksman
April 26, 2004, 01:41 PM
Unless the guy wasn't naked in his own apartment, I'm not interested in whatever excuses that the cop has.

The fact is that he shot an unarmed naked man who was in his own apartment. Period.

If the police are trying to excuse this and won't discipline or discharge the moron who shot him, then the officials in charge are just as contemptible.

That cop should be facing jail time and the civil suit from Hell. :fire:

fix
April 26, 2004, 01:50 PM
Coronach,

I have to admit that it is certainly easier to be objective about this case when one looks at the facts. The fact of the matter is that this was not an "oops, wrong house" or a bogus warrant. The dope was there. I find it easy to believe that this man was fully aware of what was going on under his roof. The cops should be given the benefit of the doubt in this case. There definitely needs to be an investigation though.

CannibalCrowley
April 26, 2004, 02:00 PM
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/219-04252004-288997.html

The above article is clearly biased in the officer's favor, but it brings about an interesting tidbit, "Keddie, posing as a maintenance man accompanied by seven other officers". So we have a plain-clothed officer as the point man in a drug raid.

If this is true, how many people here would have been waiting inside the bedroom and ended up shooting the officer? How many of us could get away with shooting a man because of a situation like this outside of one's own home: "He said Hoskins was holding a small dark object at his side, and that Hoskins stepped toward him" ?

atek3
April 26, 2004, 02:15 PM
I have to admit that it is certainly easier to be objective about this case when one looks at the facts. The fact of the matter is that this was not an "oops, wrong house" or a bogus warrant. The dope was there. I find it easy to believe that this man was fully aware of what was going on under his roof. The cops should be given the benefit of the doubt in this case. There definitely needs to be an investigation though

Ahh, so when you do find the "dope" it is okay to shoot unarmed naked men, thanks for clearing that one up.

atek3

Calenth
April 26, 2004, 02:24 PM
Are cops EVER held accountable in cases like this? Seems like I never hear about it if they are.

buy guns
April 26, 2004, 02:28 PM
why the hell would the cop pose as a maintenance man if he had a warrant?

fix
April 26, 2004, 02:30 PM
Ahh, so when you do find the "dope" it is okay to shoot unarmed naked men, thanks for clearing that one up.

Kindly point out where I said that if you don't mind.

Nightfall
April 26, 2004, 02:32 PM
Another 'war on some drugs' success story. :rolleyes:

Coronach
April 26, 2004, 02:33 PM
What we appear to have here is your garden-variety "what does he have in his hand? Oops it wasn't a gun." Which, while tragic for all involved, is a scenario that has been played out since the beginning of LE, and is not exactly an example of new-age gestapo JBThuggery.

Naturally, it all depends on the facts of the case, which two biased articles (one each way) do not provide.

Mike

atek3
April 26, 2004, 02:54 PM
you seem to be justifying this:
The cops should be given the benefit of the doubt in this case.

On the basis of:
The fact of the matter is that this was not an "oops, wrong house" or a bogus warrant. The dope was there. I find it easy to believe that this man was fully aware of what was going on under his roof.

Forgive me if this wasn't your intent?

atek3

Coronach
April 26, 2004, 03:16 PM
I think what he's trying to say is that this is not a case of modern police running amok in wholly new 'militarization of the police' style like people seem inclined to believe. Rather, it is a problem as old as the firearm itself. What does he have in his hands? Better decide in about .3 seconds. And, don't be wrong.

But, he can speak for himself.

Mike

fix
April 26, 2004, 03:29 PM
That's pretty much it, though I thought it was pretty obvious. I'll withhold comment on cop bashers/apologists and their kneejerk tendencies as my feelings have been made clear many times and are available here and at TFL.

Edit to add: There's a perfect opportunity to participate in a good old fashioned cop bashing here (http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?s=&threadid=78894), but doing it on the current thread will only make you look biased.

buzz_knox
April 26, 2004, 03:48 PM
That's pretty much it, though I thought it was pretty obvious. I'll withhold comment on cop bashers/apologists and their kneejerk tendencies as my feelings have been made clear many times and are available here and at TFL.

Actually, my first thought upon reading your post was also "how does the presence, and knowledge of presence, of drugs justify the shooting of a naked and unarmed man?" Whether or not he was committing or condoning a crime does not justify the use of deadly force, absent the requisite threat to life. You never made that distinction and the obvious intent of your statement was that he got what he deserved for allowing drugs in.

FedDC
April 26, 2004, 03:51 PM
I always love the press stories that follow an officer involved shooting. My favorite was a while back in Memphis where an officer shot a man that had hit him with a 2 X 4 and taken his gun... The officer shot the suspect with his BUG while laying on the ground with the suspect standing over him pointing the officers gun at the officers head.

Now as to how the press reported it: Well, Tyrone (Or whatever his name was) was always a good boy that loved his mama and went to church. He was always supportive of his 13 illegitimate kids and his only trouble with the law had been because of racial profiling and his search for justice in a racist society. Why, if Tyrone had been given the same chances that other people had he probably would have been a brain surgeon or maybe even president but now he is dead because a cop decided to stop and harass him which is what drove him to strik out at the evil police that were harassing him. It was really the fault of the police for being there in the first place. They should have just let him sell his dope so he could support his crack habit..I mean children. It is just typical police brutality. Killing another innocent person and those evil cops will not even be charged. Who would have thought...

Seriously folks, we are only hearing one side of this story and that is the guy that got shot. Do you really think he is going to say "Yep, I am a criminal. I did something stupid like (Insert stupid crime here) and that caused the officer to shoot me...or is he going to play the innocent victim.

buzz_knox
April 26, 2004, 03:57 PM
Seriously folks, we are only hearing one side of this story and that is the guy that got shot. Do you really think he is going to say "Yep, I am a criminal. I did something stupid like (Insert stupid crime here) and that caused the officer to shoot me...or is he going to play the innocent victim.

Agreed. But I find it hard to imagine a set of facts that would justify this shooting, given that the police dept. would have jumped to claim that the owner was armed, etc., if there were evidence to support this defense.

fix
April 26, 2004, 03:58 PM
You never made that distinction and the obvious intent of your statement was that he got what he deserved for allowing drugs in.

Well maybe you're right. How's this? The cops were justified to be a little nervous during the sweep of a home where criminal activity was known to be taking place. They entered a locked room with guns at the ready, as opposed to flowers and girl scout cookies. The description of his wounds leads me to believe that he was the victim of a negligent discharge by a nervous cop. That said, had he not permitted the criminal activity to take place in his house (which I suspect he was fully aware of), the nervous cop would not have been in the house in the first place...much less standing nervously outside the bedroom door with his finger on the trigger. I don't necessarily agree that all this was worth busting a 20 yr old with a bag of weed, but I'm not willing to buy into the innocent victim vs. JBT in this case.

Yowza
April 26, 2004, 04:14 PM
Another horribly dangerous marijuana dealer taken off the streets. Yay for the system!

The victim here could have surely not permitted the criminal activity in his house by kicking his brother out and making him someone else's problem. Maybe then the cops would have shot the brother instead. Or maybe before that happened, the brother might have turned to a life of real crime and shot some other innocent person.

Let's rail against the guy for being compassionate with his brother and nearly getting killed for it so the cops could make a pointless bust that amounts to pretty much nothing.:fire:

Rick

d-mac
April 26, 2004, 04:56 PM
think the guy knew that his brother was a user and could be caught. to think that he was safe in his house was stupid.

facts, his brother was a user. It is Illegal. When you are allowing that in your house you are open to the situation that led up to the shooting.


No excuse, illegal is illegal and this was drugs and police do have drug raids.

Was it a tragedy? YES. Did the cop have hours to see the reactions of the man behind the door? NO. Did he have seconds? MAybe split second.


Did the cop know it was his brother? Doubt it. What could he have thought? Another drug user.


I am not a cop and I am all against JBT's. I am one who believes in the fact that by letting the brother have drugs int he house and knowing his past and his interactions with LEO's, he invited this into his house.


Sorry but with drugs comes the possibility of raids. And the fact the man was 100% different than his drug brother, by letting him live in the house while Drugs were still there makes him accountable for what goes on in the house.


I am all for the use of raids and quick thinking of cops. No cop wants to Kill, Come on. Split second.


If there were no Drugs this never would have happened.

This world needs to start taking accountability for it's actions. People are themselves to blame. Enough of these McDonalds type people who never accept blame for things they, not others, do.


Sad story but you face risk when you let drug users in your house.

ksnecktieman
April 26, 2004, 05:32 PM
I think a uniformed officer should have opened that door. They had a warrant? Why did they even have a plainclothes officer in the entry team? Anyone in that apartment was not guilty when the police entered it.
The local pd may have provided him with a flag draped coffin if it was my house, and my bedroom door.

More facts needed. IF there had been a firearm in that bedroom it would have been stated in the paper, the police would have been eager to produce it, even if was only a toy with an orange nipple on it.

If a civilian shoots someone with "something" in his hand it had better have bullets in it, and he will see some striped daylight anyway.

The best thing I see for the leo here is that they found 622 guilty dollars to use for legal fees.

I will call excessive us of force here, subject to additional information.

Stebalo
April 26, 2004, 05:39 PM
Those articles are all dated. They all say "DA is investigating".

Here is the unfortunate follow up. Once again, the JBT gets off scott-free of criminal charges. I hope we see a hefty civil suit announced soon.

http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/news/42304-unarmedshooting.html

No Charges in Shooting of Unarmed Man
(Doylestown-AP) April 23, 2004 A Bucks County county prosecutor has declined to file charges against a detective for shooting a naked, unarmed man during a February drug raid.

Officials say Detective Dale Keddie thought 23-year-old James Hoskins was carrying a weapon, but Hoskins had only a wadded T-shirt by him when Keddie entered the dark bedroom of a Levittown apartment.

Hoskins was critically wounded in the abdomen and leg and has undergone at least 30 operations.

His left leg was amputated above the knee. Bucks County District Attorney Diane Gibbons says Keddie "did what he had to do under the circumstances he was facing at the time."

Officers were seeking to arrest Hoskins' brother, who was in the living room. A lawyer for James Hoskins faults Gibbons' decision.

Thomas Mellon Junior, a former federal prosecutor, says he understands the need to be concerned about the safety of police officers. But he says police officers and the district attorney also have a great responsibility for public safety.

FedDC
April 26, 2004, 05:46 PM
Ever think that maybe the DA decided not to charge the Ofc because there was no PC to charge him??? Maybe the DA saw the ENTIRE story and not just what the biased media put out... Hmmmmmm. Don't let the possibility of the truth get in your way!

mussi
April 26, 2004, 05:50 PM
I'm sure he deserved it. He was obviously clutching a deadly weapon.

You mean "This is my rifle, this is my gun..."? :p

CannibalCrowley
April 26, 2004, 06:19 PM
FedDC
Here's a link to an editorial which is biased in favor of the officer (because you must have missed it the first time):
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/219-04252004-288997.html

It offers no explanation of why the officer was let off other than the shirt. The author simply writes it off as a mistake as if nobody was troubled in the slightest. In reality a man was put into a coma and lost his leg. How would you react if the same thing happened to you?

Furthermore, the DA hasn't stepped forward to explain why he hasn't besides Keddie believing that his life was in danger.

The facts:
Keddie was not in uniform; Hoskins was naked and carrying a shirt; Keddie shot Hoskins which resulted in him going into a coma and losing his leg; so far, Keddie has gotten off scot free

While walking down the street would one be justified shooting someone who happened to be carrying a "small, dark object"?

Langenator
April 26, 2004, 06:41 PM
Am I the only one who noticed that the articles state that the cops were there to bust the victim's brother, who was in the living room. Now, I don't know the layout of the apartment in question, but every place I've ever lived, you had to go through the living room to get to the bedrooms. So I think it's reasonable to infer that the cops already had their man before they started going through the bedrooms. So why didn't they announce their presence before searching the rest of the dwelling?

For that matter, why didn't they just surround the place and knock on the front door? Why do a no-knock entrance (and didn't some court just decide that they had to knock and give 20 seconds?) with a non-uniformed cop in the lead? In my house, as I suspect would be the case in a lot of houses here (assume owner doesn't know about bro's stash in this hypothetical) said cop would have gotten a kisser full of 00 when he came through the door.

Another interesting note: given that none of the stories mentions Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, or the NAACP, i'm going to assume that Hoskins is white. Because you know that if the cops had shot a naked, unarmed black man, it'd be national news.

longrifleman
April 26, 2004, 06:43 PM
All these police shooting, beating, tasering, maceing threads are starting to run together. The details change but the arguments don't vary much.

The common problem that doesn't change is arrogance on the part of the LEOs and prosecutuors involved. It seems to be the attitude that anything they do to anyone is excused in the name of "officer safety". I don't want to see anyone hurt, including the officers involved. If that means a few crooks get away so be it. Back off. It's not like you catch all of them anyway.

No knock raids are always a disaster waiting to happen---for the people on the recieving end. The attitude I see from the LEOs is that the lives of civilians are worth less than their's. If you feel that way you are in the wrong job. Get out before you kill somebody. Somebody innocent.

A man is crippled for life over a handful of drugs and way too many think that is OK. That attitude is scary for other reasons to be discussed on other threads.

WonderNine
April 26, 2004, 06:45 PM
Another glorious victory for the pawns of drug companies and other special interests.

atek3
April 26, 2004, 06:53 PM
If there were no Drugs this never would have happened.

WRONG...If there were no drug LAWS this would never have happened.


This world needs to start taking accountability for it's actions. People are themselves to blame. Enough of these McDonalds type people who never accept blame for things they, not others, do.
Sad story but you face risk when you let drug users in your house.

Jeez... Guy takes his brother into his home...Cop shoots him and nearly loses his leg... See thats what happens when you try to be a good samaritan.
Glad we have the JBT point of view well represented on THR.

atek3

thefitzvh
April 26, 2004, 07:07 PM
Atek....

Come on man!! Can't you see that the officer felt in danger by the naked man? I mean, jeez! his only problem was his AIM!


:rolleyes:

I remained objective on this until I read the other article... BOTH articles, written from different viewpoints, illustrate the same to me: unjustified deadly force.

Also, why was this guy not in uniform?

And furthermore, has the war on drugs advanced to the point where it's now justified to cripple someone over a little dope?

Please!


James

CannibalCrowley
April 26, 2004, 07:29 PM
Also, why was this guy not in uniform?
It said in one of the articles that Keddie was not in uniform because he was posing as a maintenance man in order to get the brother to open the door into the apartment.

molonlabe
April 27, 2004, 01:28 PM
This is a very slippery slope we are on. Killing and maiming innocent people is simply wrong. Some are not so innocent but a LEO is not judge, jury and executioner.


http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/08/17/drugWarVictims.html

thefitzvh
April 27, 2004, 01:54 PM
It said in one of the articles that Keddie was not in uniform because he was posing as a maintenance man in order to get the brother to open the door into the apartment.

Is it SOP to use deception to gain entrance to a house?

James

Ky Larry
April 27, 2004, 09:23 PM
I wonder if incidents like this would continue if LEO's homes were raided and their families were shot, beaten, and terrorized? How long would the "War on Drugs" be tolerated? :uhoh:

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