Rebluing a Ruger Superblackhawk


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PaulTX
June 2, 2004, 01:02 AM
I'm looking for a recommendation for a gunsmith in the Denton, Plano, Fort Worth, or Dallas, Texas area to reblue my Bisley .44 magnum. Do you have a gunsmith you'd like to recommend to me?

Thanks,
Paul

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Badger Arms
June 2, 2004, 02:55 AM
Send the gun back to Ruger. They do a much better job. Cheaper too.

1911Tuner
June 2, 2004, 06:52 AM
Just my 2% of a buck...A blue-worn pistol or revolver has a bit of "character" that the pristine examples just don't have...especially the
single-actions and the old GI 1911s...:cool:

Luck!

Tuner

Old Fuff
June 2, 2004, 10:25 AM
I second what Tuner said unless there is some rust on the gun. However if you do decide to have the revolver refinished keep in mind that the factory (in this case Ruger) is set up to correctly polish their own products, and a top-quality re-blue job depends on how well the gun is polished before it’s blued. There is also a question about your frame – do you want it blued or refinished to look like it was case-hardened?

PaulTX
June 2, 2004, 04:18 PM
I hadn't thought about sending it back to Ruger - didn't know they provided that particular service. Thanks to all for the input. I agree a firearm with some honest wear develops some character. The pistol doesn't have any rust, the metal is smooth with no pitting. The bluing is just getting very thin on the barrel and cylinder and looks uneven overall. Well, I'll have to look it the pistol and think about it some more. I'm not trying to make it a fancy piece, just a good "working man's" gun. I was thinking about a new bluing job and not a case-hardening type.

Another Question

Last night I put in a knurled, standard size, Belt Mountain base pin to replace the stock pin. I had read very good things about BM. The base pin appears to fit fine with no modification required. The cylinder play is noticeably better - although with the stock pin the play wasn't any worse than a newer Ruger I checked out. The only problem encountered was about one in 10 times of cocking the hammer the hammer will catch on it's rearward movement about 3/8" to 1/2" from the frame. The safety slide (can't remember the correct name - it moves up to cover the firing pin when the trigger is pulled) is not catching on the slightly protruding firing pin so the base pin is doing it's job. Any ideas on what can be causing this catch at times?

This Bisley .44 with a 4-5/8" barrel is quickly becoming one of my favorite pistols! From cowboy type loads (heavy bullet, low velocity) to the heavy stuff it is a pleasure to shoot!

Thanks,
Paul

1911Tuner
June 2, 2004, 04:25 PM
Howdy paul,

Put out a call to Dave Sample. He's an old single-action smith and can probably put his finger on it. For my input, I'd guess that the play that it took out of the cylinder may have put the back into contact with the recoil shield...but that's just a WAG.

Luck!

Tuner

PaulTX
June 3, 2004, 12:08 AM
How do I contact Dave Sample?

1911Tuner
June 3, 2004, 02:39 AM
He's a forum member, but doesn't take PMs or E-mail, last I checked. Just
start a thread that calls his attention. He may be on vacation...Ain't heard a peep out of him for a few days. If so, BillZ can reach him.

Luck!

Tuner

Old Fuff
June 3, 2004, 10:54 AM
Remove the cylinder and then replace the base pin. Cock and fire the revolver a bit and see if the hammer still hangs up. If it does the problem has something too do with the new pin. If not, then it’s likely that with the cylinder having less rotational play there is a slight mis-match between the lower tooth on the hand and the cylinder’s ratchet.

After replacing the cylinder see if the hang-up occurs on a particular chamber, or on several ones. You can mark the questionable chamber(s) with a wax pencil.

1911Tuner
June 3, 2004, 05:58 PM
You go Fuff! That'll teach Sample ta go on vacation...:D

I saw a Ruger Vaquero that was hangin' up a few months ago. The
cylinder was draggin' a tiny bit on the recoil shield on half the cylinder...kinda like a wobble effect, and it looked to be due to the cylinder pin bein' drilled at a slight angle...or as near as I could determine with an eyeball check. I thought that this might possibly be the problem on this one, and the tighter fit pin could have removed the slack that let it spin easy and free before installation.

Fuff's diagnosis makes more sense. Might need to have the hand and ratchet tweaked. Not an expensive job, though.

Luck!

Tuner

Old Fuff
June 3, 2004, 09:19 PM
It is quite possible that the cylinder pin hole is drilled off center, and the ratchet face mignt be cut at an angle, or one of the ratchet teeth might be shallow, or ....

But first we need to know if the cylinder pin alone will cause the "hitch" that was described. I sort of doubt it, but we need to get past square one before we can go on to the next one.

1911Tuner
June 4, 2004, 06:26 AM
Payin' attention here. We got many many cowboy action shooters here'bouts, and when they ask me about a problem with a single-action, I
usually wind up shruggin' my shoulders if it's not an obvious thing...

Hmmm...1873Tuner. Has a nice ring to it, don't it? :cool: Wonder if they'll
let me double register under that nic too....:p (Ain't holdin' my breath)

PaulTX
June 4, 2004, 03:48 PM
Thanks for the "testing procedure" Fuff! I'll work with it some more. I would bet you have identified the trouble spot.

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