accuracy of a remington 710


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natedog
December 28, 2002, 08:10 PM
how accurate are the remington 710's (the ones with the synthetic stock and only a $400 price tag). would you say that its a MOA rifle? sub MOA? thanks

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Bacchus
December 28, 2002, 08:42 PM
About a year ago, I posted this same question on TFL. Wally World was selling the 710 for under $400, including scope and rings. Most people recommended against it, saying that it was a cheap knock-off of the 700.

Almost everyone recommended the 700 instead. From what I understand, Rem 700s are to rifles what 870s are to shotguns.

Try searching at TFL for info on it, too.

Legionnaire
December 28, 2002, 08:45 PM
I do not own one, but handled and shot a friend's. I wish he had talked to me before he bought it. I was not impressed by fit the or finish. Bolt was sticky, and the trigger was heavy and had some creep. The scope that came with it was of lesser quality than I would want on one of my guns. I was able to get groups around 1.5" with the gun using factory ammo (Remington, I believe; can't tell you anything more specific).

My opinion was that this gun is fine for someone who shoots no more than a box of ammo a year to sight in and take his or her deer. A "shooter" will want something better. If you want a low-cost gun, the Remington 700 ADL synthetic is a better gun. And take a look at the Savages. Either is better bang for the buck than the 710 ... Remington's version of the PC Jr.

natedog
December 28, 2002, 08:50 PM
what would you say is the most accurate 700 from the factory (no custom work)

Art Eatman
December 28, 2002, 10:57 PM
natedog, they all seem to have pretty much the same trigger quality. I don't care for the apparent flimsiness of the "plastic" stock on the ADL. (The synthetic stock on their Titanium rifle is excellent.)

I'd venture that a heavy-barrelled version, with a 20" or 22" length will "lead the pack" in accuracy, since those barrels are stiffer.

Cartridge? You're on your own, since one can handload and tailor a specific load to one's own rifle. Odds are, the short-action cartridges will be a bit better for best accuracy; again, stiffness of the system.

FWIW, Art

warezdog
August 20, 2005, 11:20 PM
Doesn't matter what all the 700 diehards say about the 710, its still the absolute best bang for the buck period.

Sure the 700 is an awesome rifle, it has been and will continue to be, but to place it up against the 710 and then some how have the nerve to knock it is just ridiculas.

The 710 early models did have problems in 2002 but have long been worked out. At wally world for $325 you can get a 30-06 with a decent Lupoid scope and put 3 outta 5 rounds inside a quarter at 100 yards right out of the box. (once sighted which is easy and quick)

For someone to say that the 710 isn't a good rifle is an idiot. They are made at the new plant, use alot of the 700 trigger mech and have teflon process for self lubrication. Sure the bolt is a little different but the throw is nice and it doesn't stick like the early ones. Simple at 22 parts its a great rifle for the frugal an cheap like myself.

For the price it cant be beat, even if you could get a 700 for $500+/- the 710 would still be a better deal and I won't stoop to the level to even compare it with a Savage or any other rifle in its class. They make a 270 and a 7mm as well as the 30-06 but the latter rounds are cheaper and the cartridge has proven itself since 1906 nealy 100 years.

So all you rich people that can afford to trick out your 700's to the tune of thousands of dollars great, I am happy for you but don't knock the 710. Others like me will love the 710 for both accuracy and price.

The ONLY change I would make to it thus far out of the boxis a mil-dot scope although the stock lupoid is more than adequate for most shooting.

Gewehr98
August 20, 2005, 11:41 PM
At wally world for $325 you can get a 30-06 with a decent Lupoid scope

Lupoid scope? You mean the one in the picture of the Remington 710 below with the big "B" on the windage turret cover?

http://www.remington.com/images/mag/710_5zm.jpg

That would be the Bushnell version of the Lupoid scope family, I'd wager.

A decent Leupold scope, on the other hand, is often worth more than a Remington 710.


For the record, Remington 710's are made and sold to people who don't know they can have a better rifle, for just a few dollars more. Remington 700's and Savage 110 rifles aren't the domain of rich folks, btw. Do a search on 700 ADL, say over at Gunsamerica.com or Auctionarms.com, and let me know how horribly expensive those are.

In case I hadn't done so, welcome to THR, warezdog. ;)

Bigfoot
August 20, 2005, 11:51 PM
I won't stoop to the level to even compare it with a Savage or any other rifle in its class.

That's one heck of a first post. You go big guy. :D

jefnvk
August 20, 2005, 11:56 PM
What the last two said. Definitely not a Leupold scope, midrange of those cost more than the combo.

If you want a cheaper combo from Wally World, go for the Savage combo for around $350 IIRC.

Not to mention the safety problems with bolts blowing back on the 710's, I don't know if they fixed that or not.

EDIT: BTW, at Wal-Mart, I dont believe there is a big difference between the 710 and the low end scope, and the 700 with no scope.

EDIT AGAIN: I don't even see 710's listed in Wal-Marts online catalog. 700's start at $400, Savage 111 combos at $330.

Chawbaccer
August 21, 2005, 01:03 AM
Take your 710 to a gun shop and see what they will give you in a trade :(
They have a self lubricating bolt, the ones I've seen have white grease smeared on them tho.
In the same price range as the 710 at walmart there will be Savages, Weatherby Vanguard, the Mossberg ATR, plus maybe a 700 variant.

AH-1
August 21, 2005, 02:17 AM
rem 710 the best door prop rem has very made,man what a pos...
$388.00 at wally world today you can pick up a weatherby vanguard in 300 mag.
friends don't let friends buy junk... :)
AH-1

Ifishsum
August 21, 2005, 05:00 AM
I own a 710 (ducking) and accuracy is fine for a hunting rifle. Mine has given me no problems and has taken a couple of elk. It is not a POS, but it does have shortcomings - the biggest being the mushy, sometimes sticky bolt. Trigger was not good out of box, but decent with a little adjustment.

I also own a couple of Savages, and for the same price range I think the Savage package is better. You can also get a Stevens 200 (a Savage without the accutrigger) and put decent glass on it. All budget combos I've seen come with really cheap scopes.

cracked butt
August 21, 2005, 11:39 AM
I've seen a few of them shot before and every one of them gave pretty good accuracy with factory ammo. I still wouldn't want one even if someone gave it to me.

AK-74me
August 21, 2005, 12:07 PM
Why would you want a 710 when you can get a nicer Savage for similar costs?

Uncle Alvah
August 21, 2005, 01:23 PM
"Quality remains when price is forgotten."

Rockstar
August 21, 2005, 11:41 PM
I sure am glad I tuned in to this thread. Didn't realize that I'd spent "thousands of dollars" on my VS and VLS. I have a distinct memory of paying under $500 for the VS and just over $500 for the VLS. (Granted, both were purchased a few years ago.) I've had the gleeful experience of closely examining a couple of 710's out at our local range. I can't think of a worse rifle available for public consumption. I wouldn't take a 710 as a gift.

GunGoBoom
August 22, 2005, 12:48 AM
So all you rich people that can afford to trick out your 700's to the tune of thousands of dollars great, I am happy for you but don't knock the 710.

Well I'm not rich - I'm frugal in fact, like you. In fact, the only rem 700 I have I bought used, as I considered them too pricey new. But the Savage 10/11/12 is a better gun in my view, for about the same price as a 710 (Ditto CZ 550, Howa/Vanguard, and Chuck Daly mauser). In fact, a Stevens rifle is as good or arguably better than a 710 for a lot less. The Mossy 100ATR is comparable for a lot less. I wouldn't say the 710 is crap, but there's definitely better values out there, seems to me....

In any event, to answer the question, if you can get what Legionnaire got - 1.5" with factory ammo at 100 yards, it's a fine gun and plenty good for hunting purposes. That's a very respectable group, and easily within minute-of-bambi out to 300, with a good rested shot.

mrrev
August 22, 2005, 03:34 AM
natedog, I live in Bakersfield too, and have a 710 which I purchased in December of 2004. I'm looking to sell it, let me know....

ruger270man
August 22, 2005, 07:25 AM
I'd stay away from a 710. I've never shot one, by I cycled the action.. felt very cheap, like a plastic, poorly finished toy. The same feeling I got when I drove my brothers girlfriend's cavalier..

for the money, go with a Savage 110. You can beat em, and theyre accurate as hell right out of the box.

Slinger
October 8, 2005, 11:14 PM
These posts make one thing obvious...almost none of you have tried this rifle. "Oh, I saw it in a magazine and it sucked." or "My friend had one and let me feel the magazine."
Really meritless posting to be sure. If you have bench-fired this rifle you'd be surprised. IF you do a lot of shooting. I have several rifles of the 700 variety and found this one to be a nice addition to the old cabinet. IN NO WAY a POS. That is a bogus remark. A cheap gun, yes. A less than perfect action, yes, a might sticky. The trigger on this one, though, is adjustable and shoots SWEET. I mean sweet. I was really surprised by this .270. I did replace the scope with a Redfield, though.
Anybody who wouldn't take one if it was given to them needs to contact me because I will.
BTW, I like the Savage combo, too.

itgoesboom
October 8, 2005, 11:36 PM
Slinger,

Very few people have said they would never take one, even if it was given to them. Very few have said it is a POS.

But on the other end you have someone, on his first post no less, claiming that it is an incredible rifle and deal.

Ignore both ends of the spectrum and you will find the main advice has been that the 710 works, has decent accuracy for a hunting rifle, and is probably not as good a deal or quality of other rifles @ the same price point or even lower.

I.G.B.

GunGoBoom
October 9, 2005, 12:03 AM
I hear that when the bolt smacks you in the eye socket, it's dead on accurate. :neener: :what:

akluvr
October 9, 2005, 12:25 AM
Now THAT is accuracy! Eye protection optional.

nipprdog
October 9, 2005, 12:29 AM
Why would you want a 710 when you can get a nicer Savage for similar costs?
http://glocktalk.com/images/smilies/goodpost.gif

nipprdog
October 9, 2005, 12:43 AM
That's one heck of a first post. You go big guy. :D

http://glocktalk.com/images/smilies/abovelol.gif http://glocktalk.com/images/smilies/abovelol.gif http://glocktalk.com/images/smilies/abovelol.gif

bogie
October 9, 2005, 09:18 PM
Bogie knows bolt guns.

Do NOT buy a Remington 710. Get either a 700 or a Savage Model 10/110 variant. Savage is easy to work on yourself, and Remington has better triggers available, any _any_ gunsmith who even dreams of opening a shop should know how to rebarrel one...

Why avoid the 710?

If you're posting here, odds are you're planning on doing some shooting. Some practicing. You aren't going to be able to do relatively minor things like rebarrelling that 710 - it just can't be done.

So, after you put a case of ammo down that pipe, and the accuracy is starting to go south, well... You can try to trade it for something...

Now, _if_ all you are looking for is a gun to take out for deer season, and you're the typical "buy a box of the cheapest legal for deer ammo every year or so" kinda guy, this may be the rifle for you. Irritates the heck outta me when I see you at the range tho - 10 rounds of ammo, trying to sight the darn thing in, and you can't figure out which way to crank the scope...

Gewehr98
October 9, 2005, 09:40 PM
That's one heck of a fourth post. You go big guy. :D

These posts make one thing obvious...almost none of you have tried this rifle.

Sorry. I've been a range safety officer for over 10 years. I've gotten the privilege, if you want to call it that, of firing darned near just about everything that goes bang and has been foisted upon an unsuspecting firearms market. Foisted is a good word, because that's exactly what Remington did with respect to their 710.

The best thing one can do with a 710 is cut the barrel off with a hacksaw at the junction of the barrel and receiver (You can't unscrew it, it's hydraulically pressed into the receiver for life) and discard everything but the barrel. Put the newly-liberated barrel into your car's trunk, it makes an excellent spare jack handle.

Then, since you obviously haven't experienced a better rifle than the 710 (otherwise you wouldn't be defending the POS) go buy a Savage 110/10 series, or a Remington 700. Even a plain-vanilla 700 ADL is 10x the gun that 710 was.

osteodoc08
October 9, 2005, 11:28 PM
In Remington's defense, it is better than the Remmy 522 Viper I got as a kid... :D

Kjervin
October 10, 2005, 02:59 AM
I'm pretty sure the original poster made his decision in the 3 years since this thread started, but I thought I would reply anyway. I own a 710 in .270 and it is a good gun. It won't be on the alltime list of great guns, or even great Remingtons, but it is accurate enough to take hunting and bring back some deer meat. That said, I might not take it on a hunt that I spent more then the purchase price of the rifle on airfare, outfitters, etc. I also might be looking forward to passingit down to a future Kjervin Jr, but it's and entry level Remmington and it puts the bullets downrange with reasonable accuracy. It's not a benchrest rifle, but if you miss your target with it, you're not going to get a good shot with many rifles. I would not, however take a shot at the far end of my comfortable range with it. As groups open up, you might end up having to follow a blood trail and finish what you started (not a lot of fun). If you are not too ambitious with it, it will do you proud. You need to consider, however, how ambitious you are. My other deer gun is a lever action 30-30, so I'm not trying to be Alan Quartermaine, but I do fill a tag or two, and the 710 has usually done what I have asked of it, and might get to go out again this year. I am, however, thinking of taking out my new (to me) K31 if I can get familiar with it enough by next year to use iron sights, so this might be the last year it gets to go out for a while. Conclusion, not the best gun made, but how much gun do you need?

KJ

natedog
October 10, 2005, 04:41 AM
I never ended up buying a 710...or a 700, or a 110, for that matter. Or any other scoped-bolt action rifle. I'm not sure where I was coming from when I asked the original question...

Moparmike
October 10, 2005, 05:03 AM
Dont worry, I asked the same question when I got here too. I still havent gotten a rifle I would confidently take hunting past 50yds. (I suck with irons past that, it becomes minute-of-pie-plate)

I will go check out that Savage package though.

artherd
October 10, 2005, 05:36 AM
I have two rifles worth over $5k. One over $10k.

I've shot the 710 and while I would get a used 700 instead for the same price, the 710 WAS a MOA shooter, and did have a nice feel to it belive it or not. Mag clicked in posative, and it made groups. Don't know what more a bolt gun under $2k is supposed to do.

The scope had lots of paralax, but as above, did the 100yd job I asked of it (setting off a few bottles of tannerite.)

It's not a bad rifle.

There are just other better rifles for the same $

Ash
October 10, 2005, 11:59 AM
Why waste your time with the 710 when a Stevens 200, the same rifle as a Pre Accutrigger Savage 110, can be had for $80 less??? Why waste your time with a 710 when the same quality can be had in a Mossberg 100ATR for $100 less??? Why waste your time on a rifle that will not remain in production very long when for the same price you can get one that will???

The 710 will go the way of the much better 788, and is really a cynical attempt to grab at the low end market share with the cheapest rifle possible. Even so, the profit margin on the 710 has got to be the best in the industry. Why waste the time and expense threading a reciever when you can chamber the barrel directly and then press it into a soft steel tube that looks like a reciever and then use some nylon to make it feel somewhat smooth. Heck, it has Remington stamped on it and that is all it needs, right? Kinda like the Hi-Point being the same price as a CZ-75, just doesn't make much sense.

With the Accutrigger Savage costing 5 cents cheaper and the Stevens $80 cheaper than the 710, there is absolutely no way one can say that the 710 is the best bang for the buck.

Ash

osteodoc08
October 10, 2005, 12:06 PM
Wow, I didn't even realize this thread was over 3 years old. I guess we can credit warezdog from bringing this up from the deep.

nipprdog
October 10, 2005, 07:31 PM
Wow, I didn't even realize this thread was over 3 years old. I guess we can credit warezdog from bringing this up from the deep.

this is the 3rd or 4th time that a 'new poster' has dug up an old thread, posted something stupid, insulting, incorrect, arrobant, etc...

and then never posts again.

someone is playing a game. ;)

rudemanner
February 20, 2006, 05:31 PM
Im a first time rifle buyer and amatuer rifle user. Bought my 710 just for fun, to replace old child hood memories of my 22(aka my dad's even though he said it was mine). A semi-beginner, like my self, could shoot the head off a bowling pin above the red stripe, 5 pins in 7 shots, remington rounds 165 grain, at the distance of the far ridge/ max distance of the Burro Canyon Rifle Range in Southern California. I want to say its 150 meters, but im not too sure. Im hoping its further because im always the last one back panting, and i know some of you guys are think about shooting the slow rookie holding up the "guns-down-time". That seems like good shooting to me, and the winds are usually high there.
im happy with the accuracy, but the manufacturing parts are shot to hell. the bolt stop/lock does not lock and is easily chipped. And one day it wont stop the bolt and make your next gun a lefty 700 rifle. After about the 3rd time i took it out, about the 180th shot, the cheap screws that hold down the sight mount ware out, but easily replaced. The action gets smoother everytime i use it but i rather get it professionally fixed and all the right part replaced before taking it out again. I hope remington fixed all the flaws,including the ones not posted, in their later models after 2002.
I should have bought a more reliable off the shelf rifle, but after buying it, i believe miner fixes will make it a good gun.

Michael Courtney
February 20, 2006, 09:46 PM
For the price it cant be beat, even if you could get a 700 for $500+/- the 710 would still be a better deal and I won't stoop to the level to even compare it with a Savage or any other rifle in its class. They make a 270 and a 7mm as well as the 30-06 but the latter rounds are cheaper and the cartridge has proven itself since 1906 nealy 100 years.

So all you rich people that can afford to trick out your 700's to the tune of thousands of dollars great, I am happy for you but don't knock the 710. Others like me will love the 710 for both accuracy and price.



I've purchased a total of 5 Remington 700's. All 5 of them cost between $300 and $400 dollars, and were in every respect a "poor man's rifle." Yet (except for the muzzleloader) all of them shoot MOA or better. And I expect all five to give several lifetimes of service. My Rem 700 in 30-06 has fired many thousands of rounds and killed hundreds of deer and more varmints.

I have yielded to the temptation to "trick out" a couple of them. I added HS Precision stocks to a couple of them for about $250. One wears an Arnold Jewell trigger which set me back another $200 or so.

In another decade (if not sooner), most of these 5 rifles will be worth more on the used market than I paid for them new. I doubt that will ever be true of the Remington 710.

The Rem 700 ADLs that I have purchased were more than a "poor man's rifle" they are (as every rifle should be) symbols of liberty and future heirlooms. They aren't the nicest or fanciest rifles, but at least they represent the basic level of quality and functionality that a low-end rifle should. All the Remington 710 represents is high-volume manufacturing cost control run amok.

Michael Courtney

wichitashooter
March 2, 2006, 04:03 PM
I just bought a Remington model 710 (.270) about two weeks ago. My brother and law and I went out camping this last weekend to sight it in and get a feel of how the rifle handles. Both him and I were more than impressed. He was using his Remington 700 (.308) that he has put a sniper rifle style stock on and a Leupold 9-24x40(I could be wrong on the numbers there) scope on. He has also sanded out the inside of the rifle stock to float the barell. Needless to say an excelent rifle. After sighting the 710 in at 100 yds., we were shooting targets at 500 yds. by the end of the day. And my 710 was with in an inch of his 700 99% of the time. I am not saying someday I wouldn't mind an model 700 (.243) but for right now with a beter scope I would put my stock 710 up against anything short of competition grade rifles.

Nate

nipprdog
March 3, 2006, 08:39 PM
My brother AND law and I went out camping

did you sleep in the same tent?

welcome to THR!!!

its not for the timid. ;)

fatjosh
March 4, 2006, 11:14 AM
I have one. Im pretty picky as well.
I dont like the feel of the bolt or the fact that the trigger guard is molded into the stock. The scope is about a 20 dollar model.
Now I believe the original question was accuracy. Mine will touch a full mag at 100 yards. Excellent trigger pull. Imagine what this thing could do with a good scope.

But i recommend against buying one new. I have seen lots of used ones in the 200 dollar range and I believe even the 710 haters will agree it is a very functional weapon and a steal at 200 bucks.

Ash
March 4, 2006, 06:06 PM
Since I bought a used Savage for $200, a 710 isn't a steal at that price. However, for $200, it would be an okay rifle. Even so, for that price, there are better choices out there.

Ash

Michael Courtney
March 4, 2006, 08:29 PM
But i recommend against buying one new. I have seen lots of used ones in the 200 dollar range and I believe even the 710 haters will agree it is a very functional weapon and a steal at 200 bucks.

For $200, you can get a new H&R handi-rifle, why would you want a Remington 710? You gotta think long term. A Handi-Rifle is a well made firearm that you cann pass on to your grandchildren. A Rem 710 is disposable.

Michael Courtney

EricTheBarbarian
April 19, 2006, 10:47 PM
well i do have a remington 710 and the first few times i shot it it hit me in the face for some reason. After the first three rounds I gave myself a black eye. There nothing wrong with the rifle but why shoot that when a 8x57 mauser is half the price and probably more accurate.

rangerruck
April 20, 2006, 12:30 AM
it is okay, but i would taek the savege, the mossy atr, or the stevens first. in this order, savage, stevens, mossy, remmy.

cracked butt
April 20, 2006, 02:52 AM
I've seen more than a handful of them while working deer rifle sight-ins. They all shoot good, and are capable of close to minute of angle accuracy. However, they are the Bic lighter of the rifle world. They are made cheaply and are disposable. The stevens model 200 is a far better rifle for a lower or comparable price. Remington has been making a few cheap low quality guns lately. I got burned on the 597, and you couldn't give me a 710.

bchurch
July 13, 2007, 03:06 PM
Its just what you paid for. A low cost rifle that shoots damn good.

I have shot about a hundred rounds throught the one I have (mostley at about 120 yards) and have not had any problems at all. I still prefer my 223 savage over all the other guns I have, but you can't expect every gun to shoot the primers out of a shootgun casing at 120 yards. (on sand bags of course).

I like the way so many people like to damn every body else's toys when they say " don't have one but mine is better.

When the 700 came out on the market, these same type of nay sayers cried the same way about it also. If it aint fashionable they don't want it. They probably don't have any of those either.


Does anybody have any good information on any old C.J. Hamilton &n Sons 22 rifles Model 43


Bchurch

Ash
July 13, 2007, 04:35 PM
Yeow, it's alive....again!

The 710 may shoot fine, but there are still better rifles for less money, a lot less money, than the 710. Even Remington has repackaged it as the 770 or some such thing. In the end, the fact remains the Remington 710 does not compare with equally-priced Savage 110. Worse, the 710 does not compare with rifles costing $100 less (Mossberg 100ATR) or $80 less (Stevens 200). There are NO aftermarket parts for the 710, so forget getting a better trigger. Ditto perhaps for the Mossberg, but it can at least be rebarreled (and may be able to accept a Howa/Weatherby trigger group, the jury is still out on that one). For the price of the 710 and the cheapo Bushnell scope, you could get a Mossberg 100ATR plus a pretty decent lower-end fixed power scope.

Ash, contributing as I can to a thread now 5 years old.

Ifishsum
July 14, 2007, 01:57 AM
The 710 may shoot fine, but there are still better rifles for less money

I agree with that. (Stevens 200 is a good example). I bought a 710 on sale for $299 about 5 years ago. It actually shoots quite well with both factory ammo and handloads, but the bolt feel is horrible. I have purchased 2 Savages since and I like them a lot more, but the 710 always works when I use it and it does shoot straight. Trigger is adjustable too.

marksman13
July 14, 2007, 02:57 AM
Daaaaaamnation! This thread is antique. Who said there were no such thing as zombies. Thread from the dead right here.

ConfuseUs
July 14, 2007, 05:44 AM
I've fiddled with the Model 770s at Gander Mtn (yes, the place has its uses) and came away utterly unimpressed. The bolt still has a nasty habit of sticking midway through pushing it in. However, I have never fired one or seen one fired. Matter of fact, I've only seen them in the store. I guess people don't care if it's laser accurate if you can't reliably slam a fresh round into the chamber.

Ash
July 14, 2007, 08:33 AM
There are an awfully lot of 710's in the pawn shops around here.

Ash

FIRESETTR
October 6, 2007, 09:29 PM
I bought the Remington 710 one of the last models before they changed the name to the 870 I think it is. I have the 7mm version of this rifle and picked it up for $200 close out price from wally world. One of those things that you can't pass up even before you do your research with it. Since I bought it I took it out to the local gun range and sighted it in. After 6 shots and had it down to where I wanted it, I can place 4 out of 5 inside of a quarter at 100yards. Kicks like a mule the slide is sticky but not so bad once you rack it 100 times over and over. The trigger is makes it go boom its not an accutrigger ( droooooool ) but it makes it go boom when i want it to. I've taken it hunting this deer season, saw nothing so far but still have 2 weeks left. The 7mm will turn a squirel inside out at 60-65 yards, very accurate rifle. The grey synthetic stock makes for easy cleaning and manipulation of the rifle but does make it a bit slippery when wet.

TCB in TN
October 6, 2007, 10:53 PM
I have shot the Rem 710, and it certainly is NOT the same as the 700, or for that matter the Mossy or the Savage. I have seen 710's at pawn shops for under $200 and I will say that for only another $25 to 50 bucks you can usually get a used Mossy or Savage and IMHO they are more than worth the extra money. I wouldn't turn one down if you gave me one or I found one cheap enough (I do like the drop out mag), but it would have to be a real deal and more than likely it would be one I would use to trade on, not a keeper.

Essex County
October 7, 2007, 11:35 AM
I don't usualy respond to ancient threads....But, I want to go on record that I refuse to buy firearms designed by cost accountants...Essex

armysniper
October 17, 2007, 01:44 PM
I recently purchased a used 710 .270 win as a starter rifle for myself for civilian use. In the Army we used the 700. Obviously there is no comparison. However, I cycled 115 grain, 130 grain, and 150 grain through this rifle yesterday. I must say I did not expect much from it other than it to shoot straight to stock my freezer this season, as I only paid $319.00 for it. But I was impressed with its accuracy. The bolt was smooth as could be and I had no problems. I firmly believe that you have to make do with what equipment that is available to you and it is up to you to master it. Once I had this rifle zero'd I could place a nickle on my 3 shot group at 100 yards. I can say that the scope is the biggest downfall to this rifle. But I am used to the higher quality leupold 10x that was issed on our rifles in the Army which I spent a whole lot of time looking through. But I can say it does the job and will be fine for hunting application. If there were no supermarkets and I had to rely upon this rifle to feed my family, I can assure you that we would not go hungry as a result of it being disfunctional. I am happy and content with mine and would recomend it if you could not afford anything more. It will get you outdoors and hunting and will leave you with that accomplished feeling that it will take care of you so long as you care for it.

strat81
October 17, 2007, 02:05 PM
Perhaps a mod could use a 710 to kill this thread.

But, I want to go on record that I refuse to buy firearms designed by cost accountants
As an accountant, that makes me sad. I could design an awesome rifle! With lasers! ;)

rjohnson4405
October 17, 2007, 05:35 PM
FIRESETTR: "I bought the Remington 710 one of the last models before they changed the name to the 870 I think it is."

870 is a shotgun, and it's the 770, probably a typo, but just in case. :scrutiny:

rjohnson4405
October 17, 2007, 05:37 PM
FIRESETTR: "I bought the Remington 710 one of the last models before they changed the name to the 870 I think it is."

870 is a shotty, I believe they changed it to 770, probably a typo, but just in case. :scrutiny:

rjohnson4405
October 17, 2007, 05:38 PM
FIRESETTR: "I bought the Remington 710 one of the last models before they changed the name to the 870 I think it is."

870 is a shotty, I believe they changed it to 770, probably a typo, but just in case. :scrutiny:

HGUNHNTR
October 17, 2007, 09:47 PM
The bolt handle snapped off of the first 710 I handled, that kinda sealed the deal for me. Not that I would ever buy one anyway.

p4titangt
November 9, 2007, 09:33 PM
I purchased the Remington 710 almost two years ago. At the time my friends gave me a hard time for buying it. The scope did not stay adjusted at first and the bolt is a little bit sloppy. I knew that this gun was cheap and there may be some modifications needed. ITS CHEAP! With that being said I took it to my gunsmith and had the trigger pull set at 2.5 lbs, the scope adjusted, along with a little smoothing of the cartridge. Once the work was done I put the gun to the test. With factory rounds it grouped decent using 180 grain bullets. Once I switched to hand loads using a 180 grain bullet and 54.5 grains of powder, I can shoot the 710 better than several people with 700's savages, and even a kimber....yes a kimber which is much more expensive than the purchase price of my gun and all the work done to it. To put is simple....300 yards it stays grouped less than 1/4". With any gun that you buy for only a couple hundred dollars you have to asume that you may have to have to make some changes to get the best performance. When you spend lots of money on a gun you expect the manufacture to do it for you.

Bigfoot
November 9, 2007, 10:51 PM
1/4" groups at 300 yards?

OK.

Welcome to THR.







IT WON'T DIE. EVER.

p4titangt
November 10, 2007, 07:24 PM
I forgot to mention that my 710 is the 30-06 and that the bullet is a soft boat tail. Here is a pic of the handy work of the 710.

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/3644/elkwith710nr4.th.jpg (http://img126.imageshack.us/my.php?image=elkwith710nr4.jpg)http://

BAT1
November 10, 2007, 09:36 PM
Try the Stevens rifle, 310.00, A Mossberg ATR, 289.00, A Savage 429.00 or a Remington SPS 399.00 They would be a rifle you would be happy with down the line.You deserve better.

p4titangt
November 11, 2007, 01:49 PM
Dont get me wrong I am going to purchase another rifle later on and most likely it will be one of the remington 700's. I'm only saying that the remington 710 really isn't that bad. It hits a target and even brings down game when you need it. What more do you want from it? The rifle I would really love to have is an old Model 70. :)

Gunnerpalace
November 11, 2007, 03:35 PM
QUOTE]Don't get me wrong I am going to purchase another rifle later on and most likely it will be one of the Remington 700's. I'm only saying that the Remington 710 really isn't that bad. It hits a target and even brings down game when you need it. What more do you want from it? The rifle I would really love to have is an old Model 70.[/QUOTE]

He has a point I usually say if it works don't knock it, But... I have ran the bolt on both the 710 and the 770, and it feels like a toy gun therefore I would not but one.

thebaldguy
November 11, 2007, 09:10 PM
My girlfriend's nephew got one for a graduation gift. His .270 shoots with 1-2 inch accuracy at 100 yards/meters. You can tell the rifle is much different than a 700.

rcmodel
November 11, 2007, 09:14 PM
300 yards it stays grouped less than 1/4".Oh, come on!
I got a hundred dollar bill that says it won't shoot 1/4" groups at 100 yards, let alone 300.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

Gewehr98
November 11, 2007, 09:43 PM
Because you've found the Holy Grail of the benchrest rifle gang if it shoots like that.

Of course, I can always shoot one round at 300 yards and call it a .308 group. :rolleyes:

Super Trucker
November 11, 2007, 10:07 PM
They discontinued the 710 for a reason. I would not buy it. You can get a 700 ADL for less than $100.00 more

birdbustr
November 12, 2007, 01:29 AM
No way would I take a 710 over a 700 ADL for about the same price.

So they give you a cheap scope and mounts included. That cheap scope is what gave Bushnell the tainted reputation that they are just now getting away from (I know the 3200 and 4200 models are a new improved breed of Bushnell).

Take a look at gunbroker.com and see how people are begging to sell these rifles.

The new "improved" model 770 is the new Remington cheap-o. That may be better, but I would go with the 700 ADL and make upgrades as I got the money if I was limited in what I could spend.

Savage and Mossberg also have a reputation for being a cheap way to enter the shooting sports. They also have found redemption in the last decade and have developed a following.

You get what you pay for, and if you can't afford what you want. Save up until you can. The cheap way out is never the best option.

Tarvis
November 13, 2007, 04:31 PM
What a topic, such heated debate. This is almost like the democrats (710 = good) vs the Republicans (710 = garbage) ;).

ANYhow: It seems to me that one mans potato is another mans propane fueled projectile. The 710 is a great rifle for the cost [I]FOR SOME PEOPLE[I], however it may leave others wanting. I am the proud owner of a Remmy 700 Police in 300 win mag and leupold vari-x III (a $2500 package). This is a rifle made for putting holes in things from a far distance. This rifle can definetly out shoot me (currently, anyhow). That being said, if I could buy a <$400 rifle and put a $500 scope on it and have a 1/4 moa rifle, what a fool i must be. I spent six months worth of savings on a real sniper rifle and i coulda bought a wally world special that would do the same thing. Wrong my friend.

p4titangt, you cant be serious. 1/4" at 300 yards means the SAME HOLE at 100 yards. Your first statement may have been true, that you could out shoot others shooting a 700, savage and a kimber, which reflects on thier ability to shoot just as much as yours. No offence intended, but if you are telling me that your handloads in your 710 are better than my handloads in my tricked out 700P, put your money where your mouth is.

p4titangt
November 14, 2007, 01:09 AM
Tarvis, you are exactly right. At 100 yards it will hit the same hole. I'm not posting to this thread to brag about how well I can shoot or that the 710 is better than your tricked out 700P. And a $500 scope? Where did that come from. The Bushnell scope that came with it is the same scope I am using.

All I am saying is that when you find a good powder, bullet, and primer combo....you can get superb results. As I mentioned before Factory Loads did not group as well in my 710. The grouping that I got with the factory loads at times weren't even consistant. On more than one occasion there would be a bullet off all by itself. That being said, after handloading many different combos you can find a combo that will be THE load for your gun and if you are a serious handloader you would know that. Also as I said before that my 710 did have work done to it to get it to where it is. Just by adjusting the trigger pull on your rifle to the way you shoot can add tremendous accuracy. Adjust your scope horizontal line exactly level and adjust your scope vertical line near perfect to dead center on your barrel. Then adjust your sights. Perfect example: I have a savage mark II .22 that did not shoot well because the front of my scope was tightened down too far to the left and the tube of the scope was slightly turned to where the horizontal scope lines where not level to the gun. When I would shoot the gun I could not hit the target consistantly. When my Dad shot it because of the way he held it he was more consistant with the gun. Once I discovered the scope issue I become much more consistant with the gun. As I said before when you buy a more expensive and well made gun you will get better out of the box accuracy because the manufacture know you will demand nothing less from them. When you buy a cheaper gun...patience is a vertue to get the results you desire. If you don't believe the 1/4" group at 300 yards then so be it. Take then only the fact that it gets the job done as seen in my previous picture. To argue with a person who has their mind made up, is the same as carrying on a conversation with a brick wall. I mearly am offering my experience and opinion of the 710 for you to take and use how you choose.

KBintheSLC
November 14, 2007, 05:47 PM
As stated above 1/4" at 300 yards = BS

Tarvis
November 15, 2007, 03:44 PM
I may have come off rude at first, let me digress. I'm sure the 710 is a decent rifle for the price that gets the job done, and apparently you have yours tuned up very well.


I suppose it is possible to shoot a .30 group at 100 yards with a $400 rifle scope combo. I don't know how many shots that is, but as stated earlier

Of course, I can always shoot one round at 300 yards and call it a .308 group.

I don't know how many rounds you fired to make your group or how you were measuring. My point was that if in fact it was shooting .30 groups at 100 yards, you found the holy grail of rifles. It seems to me that manufacturers cut cost by omitting steps in production, such as glass/aluminum block bedding and using lower quality barrels, lower quality bolts etc. I'm not basing this on known facts, this is just my observation and understanding of how things work.

My point in the $500 scope was that I could have made a rifle worth less than half my rifle and had the same accuracy, not that you replaced the scope on your rifle.

You are most certainly correct about foactory loads. It seems to me that no factory load will ever achieve the accuracy of a well made handload, mostly because of brass preperation and OAL. Black Hills makes excelent ammo, but the OAL, for liability reasons, is such that it will operate in any production rifle and will never come close to the lands. The handloads I make are .05" or so from the lands and are .3" longer than the black hills ammo i bought.

In closing, you must be an excelent marksman with groups that small in general, but I'd be lieing if I didn't say I doubt the 710's potential to achieve the groups you're talking about.

jsin607
January 13, 2008, 06:09 AM
My 710 will put them in the same hole a 100 yards all day long.

I even got a Simmons 4x12x50 scope at a yard sale for $10

I have probably spent more on ammunition than I did on the gun itself.

Good deal, good gun.

The best part was I got it at Wal-Mart

forever_the_newguy
February 20, 2008, 05:12 PM
I OWN A 710 its junk 200 rounds of ammo, mag latch broke, bottom line.......i'm looking for something abit more stable its a POS

MCgunner
February 20, 2008, 05:22 PM
I've never owned one, so I should even comment on the rifle. I've heard all the detractors, but I've learned that's pretty meaningless on net boards. :D I can say, I wouldn't trade my M722 for a box car full of 'em, but there's more to do with the sentimental value of that rifle.

I do know that the Remingtons I've fired over the years have tended to better consistent accuracy than your average Savage. This is not to say that the Savage isn't plenty accurate or can't be made superbly accurate, just that out of the box, Remington ha always done better for me. I sighted in a guy's M788 once for him in .22-250. That gun was plain, a beat up POS to look at and had a hard, creepy trigger. But, I took run of the mill store bought ammo and made a dime sized 5 shot hole with it. The 788 was the bargain shelf Remington of its day. I hope the 710 is similar, but I've never fired one to know.

Ash
February 20, 2008, 08:11 PM
As long as the barrel holds up. There is no way to re-barrel it. It costs as much as a Savage but is a Bic lighter. When it's accuracy degrades, there isn't anything that can be done for it (except perhaps to counter-bore it). Once you reach a certain point, the only thing that can be done is to strip it of usable parts and throw the barrel/receiver way. Unless, of course, you grow tomatoes and can use it for a stake.

Even the Mossberg 100ATR, which is much cheaper, can be re-barreled (and has a real receiver, not a mild-steel tubing called a receiver).

Ash

the naked prophet
February 20, 2008, 10:52 PM
I bought one (.243 Win) cause it was on clearance at Wal-Mart for... get this... $200. I even got a $50 rebate on top of that!

With Federal 100 grain Power-Shok or Vital-Shok ammo (can't remember which), it shoots consistent 5-shot groups under 3/4" at 100 yards. With Winchester Super-X 100 grain, it shoots right at 1 1/8" groups every time.

I don't know about barrels wearing out, barrels being not-replaceable, or whatnot. I sure as heck wouldn't pay $400 for one, but it does seem more solid than the Savage I bought for $350 that had a flimsy stock, rattling bolt, and couldn't keep groups under 6 inches at 100 yards.

When my Remington 710 wears out, I'll have saved up enough for a really nice rifle of some sort.

rust collector
February 21, 2008, 12:37 AM
If there's something to be gleaned from this old thread and dozens like it:

Check in and hang around before making a major purchase decision, and you'll get many opinions and a few facts.

You still have to wade through a lot of BS to get to the truth of the matter.

We like opinions based upon experience, but someone who has made that choice is more likely to defend it than to admit making an unfortunate choice.

Someone starting out is wise to proceed with caution. Most of us wish we had kept our first guns, but most of us received or bought inexpensive guns that were soon outgrown. A wise choice starting out can be a joy for a great many years.

Don't ask the question if you can't stand to hear the answer ;)

bogie
February 21, 2008, 12:56 AM
How did I miss this one the first time around?

Where do you live? How much money you got? I can travel.

I'm gonna bring a rifle and action made by someone you've never heard of... It's just a little .243 caliber - will you give me a handicap?

Ash
February 21, 2008, 09:18 AM
"but it does seem more solid than the Savage I bought"

It seems that way because of the plastic inserts in the receiver. What feels like solid is really just temporarily tight. When the plastic wears down, it'll wobble just fine. The Solid fit of the magazine is due, also, to said plastic. The receiver, however, while solid, is considerably less sturdy than the Savage or Remington 700 or Mossberg 100ATR, being mild steel. It cannot be rebarreled because the barrel is merely pressed into the receiver. Headspace cannot be adjusted or corrected because the bolt locks into the barrel.

At $150, it probably is a good deal. The 710 obviously had defects as it has been rebadged 770 with a different, Nike-looking stock and swivels copied from the Mossberg 100ATR.

Folks are welcome to like it. But make no mistake, the 710 is not, nor will it ever be, a better rifle than the Stevens 200 at the same price. It cannot be rebarreled. It cannot be re-stocked because there are no other stocks available for it. It cannot be re-chambered. And if headspace goes on it, the rifle cannot be repaired.

Ash

MCgunner
February 21, 2008, 12:30 PM
I don't know anyone off hand that has ever burned a barrel out of a rifle. I suspect those that shoot THAT much don't go for bargain shelf guns at Wallyworld. I don't have a 710, but it don't sound like that bad a beginner gun or a hunter's rifle, frankly, from what folks are saying.

I have an old Savage 110 in 7 mag I got in the early 90s just after they'd restructured. It's essentially the Stevens in that it has the old trigger. The rifle is picky about bullets. Yeah, there's some that I couldn't get better than 4-6 MOA out of, but Nosler partition 160s and Sierra 150 Game Kings shoot 1 MOA over a stout load of RL22. 1 MOA is all that I ask of a hunting rifle. That gets me well within minute of deer shoulder at 400 yards and in. The Savage might be picky about loads, but it normally will shoot, in my experience, 1 MOA with a good load matched to it. If you haven't gotten good hunting accuracy from your Savage, you haven't played with loads enough.

By contrast, my two Remingtons shoot sub 2 moa with a BAD load and best loads are 3/4 moa. I've floated that 7 mag, but have done nothing to the Remingtons figuring if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Neither gun is a 710, though, but like I say, I've fired CHEAP M788s that shot unbelievably well with ordinary off the shelf factory loads. The Remingtons I have experience with aren't that ammo picky.

Ash
February 21, 2008, 02:45 PM
In the end, the 710 is a dead end. It may be a beginner's rifle, but it is the beginning and end. You cannot get a 710 and make it nicer down the road. It is what you can get, and it is more expensive than other beginner rifles while at the same time, much cheaper construction. At the same price as the Savage 110 with accutrigger and the same quality (if different manufacture) scope, the 710 is very clearly inferior, if only because it cannot be re-stocked or rebarreled down the road. And, while you very clearly got a lemon in the savage, such rifles are not routinely 4-6 MOA shooters. They are known, for good reason, for being accurate, if not elegant, shooters.

So, the question is, is a fellow well-served, for the price of $300 retail, in buying a 710? It may work for him, but for the money he could get much better. Mild steel versus ordnance steel, 100% steel receiver versus steel with plastic inserts, machined tang safety versus stamped (and very small) side safety, large aftermarket support versus no aftermarket support, replaceable barrel versus non-replaceable, and, very importantly, still in production versus discontinued and replaced with an updated version of the same. Even Remington seemed to realize the 710 wasn't all that great.

Ash

MCgunner
February 21, 2008, 05:45 PM
Good points all. One thing about the Savage I like is, with a headspace go/no go gauge set a barrel, and barrel nut wrench, I can change calibers at home. I may decide I'd rather have a .338 than a 7 mag or something, you never know. :D Not likely, but you can change calibers if you feel a need.

GhostCat
April 24, 2008, 02:57 AM
CRAP!!!!......Why did I have to read this thread????.......Anyone want to buy a REM 710 - .300 WIN MAG???

$300

Ash
April 24, 2008, 10:40 AM
Well, if you already have it, then keep it. I might advise against buying one, but now that you have it, don't worry too much. Use it. You liked it enough to buy it, they are reasonably accurate rifles, and you can put any kind of scope on it you like. It still makes a decent hunting rifle and, unless you have had trouble with it, you really have no reason to part with it.

Ash

Tarvis
April 24, 2008, 12:12 PM
RESSURECT! LIVE, THREAD OF ANCIENT TIMES!!

Seriously though, you ought to know that you get what you pay for. It's cheap for a reason.

Gary - K7GLD
May 13, 2008, 11:13 PM
Whoa

These posts make one thing obvious...almost none of you have tried this rifle. "Oh, I saw it in a magazine and it sucked." or "My friend had one and let me feel the magazine."
Really meritless posting to be sure. If you have bench-fired this rifle you'd be surprised. IF you do a lot of shooting. I have several rifles of the 700 variety and found this one to be a nice addition to the old cabinet. IN NO WAY a POS. That is a bogus remark. A cheap gun, yes. A less than perfect action, yes, a might sticky. The trigger on this one, though, is adjustable and shoots SWEET. I mean sweet. I was really surprised by this .270. I did replace the scope with a Redfield, though.
Anybody who wouldn't take one if it was given to them needs to contact me because I will.
BTW, I like the Savage combo, too.

Amen, for sure! ;)

Far too many "rifle Connoisseurs", or elite, comparing guns by guesswork or having not actually held or shot one - then rendering judgement based more upon prejudice and peer popularity than actual, tested FACT!

For sure, different folks have different needs and uses, and for many, the primary use of a rifle is to place an accurate shot in perhaps a couple of larger game like deer and elk per season - and THAT hardly requires thousand dollar rifles and similar scopes.

A few years back, you'd get lynched for recommending pistols making major use of synthetics in their construction - because they "look and feel CHEAP" - ah, but look at them NOW! :neener:

If you're going to drag a rifle around in wet and scruffy areas to bag your annual Buck, it makes far more sense to do it with a relatively inexpensive rifle that can stand up to the abuse decently, than a "showcase" rifle whose greatest asset is exquisite checkering and engraving - sort of like it makes more sense to take down a tree with an axe, than with a surgeon's scalpel...

I have a Remington 270 that is rugged, shoots straight EVERY time, and the deer in the sights have NO idea whether they're being dropped with a Remington - or a Weatherby, and they TASTE the same on the table, too! ;)

Ash
May 13, 2008, 11:23 PM
You miss the point. The complaints about the 710 was that it was more cheaply made than the Savage 110 of the day, yet was more expensive. It remains more expensive than the Stevens 200 as well as the Mossberg 100ATR, yet it is not as well made as either.

In other words, the Remington 710 and 770 are inferior to construction to other rifles that actually cost less while at the same time, a complete dead-end because what you have is what you get. They are the Bic lighter of the rifle world. Yeah, they shoot accurately and that may be enough for anyone, but there are better rifles out there for the same or less money than the 710. If you have a choice between a Yugo and a Chevy Cavalier, and they are the same price, which one is actually a better deal? Or, you have a Cadillac Cimmeron, which was just a dressed-up Cavalier versus a Ford Taurus, which one is a better deal? The Caddy might be a Caddy, but the Taurus was a better car for less money.

The Stevens is a better rifle than the 710 or 770 for less money. The Mossberg has no aftermarket support like the 710 but is still a better rifle for less money. Heck, there are 700's which are certainly better rifles for just a little more money.

And that, in the end, is the complaint with this product.

Ash

magnum85
June 28, 2008, 08:52 PM
Didn`t you guys hear? Remington had a major recall on the 710. So they renamed it the 770 so they could get out of hot water!

jon_in_wv
August 26, 2008, 07:02 AM
The local pawnshop seems to always have a couple 710s selling for about 199 bucks. Usually you can talk them down a bit too. That tells me something about the rifle.

glock2008
September 4, 2008, 06:34 PM
I wouldn't call a recall of guns made between july and october of 2002 a major recall...

http://www.remington.com/safety/model_710_notice/

gamestalker
May 9, 2009, 06:12 PM
I was looking over some of the opnions regarding the Rem. 710 and thought I would post my first hand experience with this jewel of innovation. Most complain about the action being stiff and that is only because of the new concept. The bolt is tightly milled to fit with a special machine finnish and coated to keep this quality. WE are all pretty used to the feel of the common action, 700s, 70s, 110s, and so on. This action wasn't made using the same concept. First of all, it is a 3 lug lock into the barrel, not the reciever. I've also heard complaints about the trigger being drifty, hard, and just not claen. This trigger is a 3 stage jewel and can be adjusted to any pull desired with some very simple adjustments. What ever you do, do not file or lap on any sear or other release parts of this trigger as it is made of a carbon type material and will crumble. But that isn't necessary anyway considering the excceptional quality of this 3 stage jewel Remington included in the first production line. I'm told that the newer 710s don't have all of the extra features such as the 3 stage trigger, barrel may be different too. If you look around you can find a good number of these first proiduction 710s used for around $300 or so and they are worth every penny. I found the instructions for fine tuning the trigger on sniper country. The barrel is button lapped. A button crowned barrel as well makes for a nice accurate rifle which it has. Pilliar bedded action is another added feature Remington included. To remedy the stiff action I simply did some light lapping and now have a smooth sweet throw which is about 60 degrees. The rifle is heavy, but that to me is a plus considering the barrel is of armory grade steel and heavier than most standard production rifles. Mine which is a 7mm rem. mag puts 5 through the same hole at 20 yards consistentlly! My son bought a 700 and it didn't even perform as well as my 710. I do agree with the optic complaints though. But I always complain about optics unless it says Leupold on it. I never even shot the rifle until I switched the optic out with a nice Leupold.
gamestalker

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