Could you alter this Glock trigger?


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Mastrogiacomo
June 23, 2004, 08:12 PM
I've been interested in getting a new Glock but I don't want the 10 lbs trigger pull. This link: www.fsguns.com shows the new models under "MA Glocks." Could anything be done to reduce the pull?

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Old Fuff
June 23, 2004, 11:26 PM
Glock trigger assemblies have a part called the "connector" that can be changed to adjust the trigger pull from about 3 1/2 pounds up. Modifications should be performed by an armorer that is trained to work on Glock pistols, and you should keep in mind that the heavier pulls are intended to reduce the chance of an unintended shot. In effect they duplicate the double-action trigger pull of a revolver.

SDC
June 23, 2004, 11:42 PM
Definitely; I've got 2 Glocks; with the proper connectors and some judicious polishing, one has a 3.5 lb pull, and the other has a 5.5 lb pull.

Mastrogiacomo
June 23, 2004, 11:44 PM
I was confused when I read the description of the triggers on that link. What would I use to bring it down to a five pound pull? Who would I send them off to for work?

R.H. Lee
June 23, 2004, 11:48 PM
I dunno anything 'bout Glocks, but apparently somebody does:

http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/

http://www.glockfaq.com/

http://www.sportshooter.com/gssf/dalerhea_dremeling.htm

Jim Watson
June 24, 2004, 12:50 AM
This guy can put a 1.5 pound trigger pull on a Glock.
Can you handle it?
http://www.vanekcustom.com/index.htm

There are other shops mentioned at Glocktalk if you want something better than stock but more forgiving than that.
http://glocktalk.com/index.php?s=

Graystar
June 24, 2004, 01:16 AM
I thought new Glocks came with a 5 - 5.5 lbs trigger. Since when did Glock start making 10lbs triggered guns available to the civilian market?

Mastrogiacomo
June 24, 2004, 01:32 AM
Come to Massachusetts and find out....:evil:

Das Pferd
June 24, 2004, 02:15 AM
10 Ilbs? Dang my double action revolver is only around 12.

Andrew Wyatt
June 24, 2004, 02:34 AM
you could put a comminoli safety on your glock after getting a trigger job.

JohnKSa
June 24, 2004, 10:32 PM
If you poke around you should be able to find a Glock Armorer's manual online for download.

Read it and you will understand which parts you want to replace.

There are two parts which can vary the trigger pull weight on the Glock.

One is the trigger spring, the other is the connector.

The connector is available in three styles, the 3 lb and the 5 lb and the 8 lb.

The springs are available in three weights, stock, New York and New York+

With a stock spring, the connectors will give pulls that are about 3.5 lbs, 5.5lbs and about 8lbs.

With the New York spring, the 3 & 5 lb connectors will give pulls that are about 5.5lbs about 8-9lbs.

With the New York + spring, the 3 and 5 lb connectors will give pulls that are about 6-7 lbs and 9-11 lbs.

Glock states that you should never use the New York springs with the 8lb connector.

I recommend that you start with the stock coil spring and a 5lb connector. That's the original weight, and I think that you won't have any troubles with it.

You could also go with the New York spring with the 3lb connector. That also gives a pull that is about 5lbs, but it's got a different feel that some folks like.

waktasz
June 25, 2004, 02:29 AM
john, very good info, but there is one thing I'd like to add.

Trigger springs also come in a reduced power type, which I got, and along with my 3.5 connector and good polish job, gives a nice smooth light trigger pull. Still ok for carry, it's not THAT light.

RON in PA
June 25, 2004, 12:19 PM
A question for those unfortunate to live in the People's Republic of Taxachewsits: Having purchased a new Glock with the mandated 10 pound trigger are you legally allowed to alter that trigger?

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