1911: Customize internals and refinish simultaneously?


PDA






Shmackey
December 28, 2002, 10:20 PM
Let's say you've decided to replace the internals, sights, bushing, etc. of your Kimber with Brown or Wilson parts, Bomar, what-have you... And you're going to have the whole thing refinished--let's say NP3 inside and out.

Do you replace all the internals, break it in for a while, and then do the finish? Or do you refinish at the same time? Seems like the former makes more sense, even though you're looking at two trips. You can make sure that everything's been installed right (by putting through 1000 rounds) and you'll also wear everything in where it should wear in, rather than refinish and then wear down those spots.

What do you think? If you did something like this, what'd you do?

If you enjoyed reading about "1911: Customize internals and refinish simultaneously?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Wakal
December 28, 2002, 10:34 PM
I'm no high dollar supersmith, but I do turn out a fair number of 1911 types for carry and competition.

I usually prefer stainless parts when possible. The frame and barrel get finished (or refinished, if a rebuild) after I can run the piece a few hundred rounds with nary a bobble. I avoid any kind of finish on the hammer/sear/disconnector, although I would like to experiment with a hard chrome and torture test (next to an untreated gun) to see if the trigger job would last longer.

Running, say, an aluminum trigger with a stainless or titanium bow, stainless sear/disconnect/hammer, stainless pins, stainless levers/mag release, and a stainless barrel...why coat any of those parts?



Alex

HSMITH
December 28, 2002, 11:26 PM
Do it ALL at once. You are going to have to break-in the pistol again, and might as well only do it once. I don't trust a new 1911 until it has run at least 500 rounds of ball and 200 rounds of carry ammo without a hitch. Break-in once and have a gun you can trust.

I have done it both ways, I will always do it all in one shot after splitting it out. It takes too much time and ammo to split it, not to mention having your new toy that is not trustworthy for a longer period of time.

Wildalaska
December 29, 2002, 01:37 AM
You do not refinish hammer, sear, disconnector. Everything else gets done. If using teflon or telfon type, you will get some tolerance stacking so you have to shoot it loose anyway..

Unless otherwise requested, we Teflon everything including bbl and trigger, with the exception of the aforementioned parts...

Shmackey
December 29, 2002, 02:04 PM
Wildalaska, are you also in the do-it-all-at-once group?

ruger357
December 29, 2002, 02:46 PM
I would do both at the same time.

Wildalaska
December 29, 2002, 04:10 PM
Originally posted by Shmackey
Wildalaska, are you also in the do-it-all-at-once group?

Yep fit the parts, test fire for functioning, and send it off. No matter what the "coating: it will need to be broken in after.

farscott
December 29, 2002, 06:50 PM
I have used both of these methods. In 1998, Robar lightly modified a Colt Stainless Lightweight Commander to meet my needs. The only new parts were a short Videcki trigger, an Ed Brown mainspring housing, and new sights, but the gun was dehorned and the front strap and mainspring housing were stippled. Robar also opened up the ejector port and polished the breechface. This gun was refinished in NP3, inside and out, as part of the gunsmithing. I was totally satisfied with Robar's work and would not hesitate to do it all again. Simply put, this Commander shoots. Break-in was a snap due to the lubricity of the NP3.

This year I have been slowly modifying a new stainless rollmark Colt Government Model and shooting it as I go. I have installed a new Casull short trigger, an Ed Brown mainspring housing, and a Wilson hammer and grip safety. I still have not decided on finish (stainless works pretty well and does not require a refinish the way the dehorned anodized aluminum did) and sights. I will probably get another Robar rear sight since I am so pleased with the sight on my Commander, but the finish question is still open. I have one other Commander that is finished in hard chrome and I like the durability of that finish, and NP3 is always a candidate.

I really think either method will provide the results you seek as long as the refinishing is done properly. I have had experience (6 handguns) with Robar and have been very pleased with their work. I have no connection with Robar other than being a satisfied customer.

NEon
December 30, 2002, 04:10 PM
Originally posted by Shmackey
Let's say you've decided to replace the internals, sights, bushing, etc. of your Kimber with Brown or Wilson parts, Bomar, what-have you... And you're going to have the whole thing refinished--let's say NP3 inside and out.

Do you replace all the internals, break it in for a while, and then do the finish? Or do you refinish at the same time? Seems like the former makes more sense, even though you're looking at two trips. You can make sure that everything's been installed right (by putting through 1000 rounds) and you'll also wear everything in where it should wear in, rather than refinish and then wear down those spots.

What do you think? If you did something like this, what'd you do?

Break it in with the new parts, then finish the whole shebang! You will happy you did!

Shmackey
December 30, 2002, 09:40 PM
Break it in with the new parts, then finish the whole shebang! You will happy you did!

What about the parts where bare metal is exposed, like milling the slide for a low-mount Bo-Mar? I wouldn't want to leave it in the white while I'm shooting it, even in dry Colorado.

Wildalaska
December 30, 2002, 09:47 PM
All you need to do is put a few hundred rounds through it, then refinish...you may need to lap it in after refinishjing....

If you enjoyed reading about "1911: Customize internals and refinish simultaneously?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!