1911 mainspring vs BHP mainspring


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Rival
July 1, 2004, 11:01 PM
Is it just me, or it is significantly harder to cock the hammer on BHP comparing to 1911? Why is that?

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Stephen A. Camp
July 1, 2004, 11:19 PM
Hello. If I remember correctly, factory standard for the 1911 mainspring is around 23 or 24 lbs. For several years now the Hi Power mainspring has been 32 lbs. I suspect that the reason is that the Hi Power slide is less massive than the 1911. Not only the recoil spring, but the mainspring retard the slide's rearward motion. The lighter slide requires more spring.

Best.

Rival
July 1, 2004, 11:38 PM
If I understand you correctly, if someone was to install a stronger recoil spring they could install weaker mainspring? The reason I am asking, is that I am very confident in having hummer down on the loaded chamber in 1911. I do understand the special care that must be taken when one is to practice condition 2. However with BHP same condition is less comfortable, because it is much harder to cock hummer when needed. Condition 1 with BHP is also questionable to me because of the absence of grip safety.

Stephen A. Camp
July 1, 2004, 11:42 PM
Hello. I'm certainly no gunsmith, but as I understand it, both springs retard the rearward slide velocity and impact to meet whatever parameters the maker's deem suitable. Some folks do reduce their mainsprings from 32 to 28 or 26-lbs, apparently w/o ill-effect. Older Hi Powers I own do have the lower-strength mainsprings and I've been shooting them for decades.

Best.

Rival
July 1, 2004, 11:44 PM
Oh, one thing I wanted to ask you - do you have an original of the image on the front of your website? The image was not sized properly and it does not look the way it's supposed to. If you can give me the original I can properly size it and it will look much better.

Stephen A. Camp
July 1, 2004, 11:47 PM
Hello. No, but thank you.

Best.

Old Fuff
July 2, 2004, 12:27 AM
The hammer springs in Browning Hi-Power's was also increased to insure they'd fire heavier primers in 9mm ammunition intended to be used in sub-machine guns with fixed firing pins.

And as has been pointed out, that and a stronger recoil spring help buffer the slide when sub-gun ammunition or other hot loads are fired. The 9mm cartridge is loaded to much higher pressure levels that the .45 ACP.

BHPshooter
July 2, 2004, 01:05 AM
The facts have been covered, but an interesting sidenote: As I understand it (which means I may be wrong), the 1911 mainspring pushes the hammer forward. The BHP mainspring pulls the hammer forward.













Yes, I know, I'm a geek. :D :uhoh:

Wes

stans
July 2, 2004, 08:01 AM
Although you can reduce mainspring pressures and compensate to a degree with increased recoil spring pressures, there is a trade off to consider. The heavy mainspring hold the slide and barrel in battery just a little longer during peak operating pressure than the lighter mainspring. The heavy recoil spring will cushion the slide as it reaches the rear most portion of its journey, but it will propel the slide forward with more force and increase the impact pressure on the barrel, the bottom lugs on the barrel and the slide stop pin or frame lug that the barrel bottom lug engages during lock up. There is no free lunch.

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