Hoban mod. 45 .22?


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5x5
July 11, 2004, 01:52 PM
Hello,
Can anyone tell me anything about this rifle. It's a single shot bolt action in .22 short, long and long rifle built in the 1940's. It was made as a military replica for boys. Thanks, Ian

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Jim K
July 12, 2004, 06:15 PM
The Hoban Mfg. Co., Salem, Michigan, was active about 1945-1950. They made a little .22 bolt action, single shot, rifle designed to look like the M1 carbine; they may have made other models also, but that is the only one I have found in a search.

Jim

kooltrav
August 21, 2004, 05:26 PM
hello i have 2 hoban rifles and i also am trying to fine out their value so i can insure then i found i at a auction site that is going for $125 i got mine from my father that got them from his grandfather so i know they are old i hear they are rare to find also just thought i post it to let you know your not the only one looking for info on the hobans

Jim K
August 23, 2004, 12:04 AM
They are rare, and fairly old, if you call 55 years or so old.

Trouble is that for high value you need rarity and age, but you also need demand, and there is very little for those guns. The Blue Book doesn't even list them.

Since yours have sentimental value, I would insure for as much as you can, but realistically, the $125 on that auction site is about as much as one would bring.


Jim

Jagermeister
August 23, 2004, 11:53 AM
well: Bust My Bubble

JM

Hoban
February 12, 2006, 10:24 AM
Hoban Mfg. Co. succeeded the Hamilton Rifle Co. (1874-1889), that. In turn, became Plymouth Iron Windmill Co. (1887-1895) and eventually, the Daisy Mfg. Co. in 1899, which he ran until his death in 1933 when Pat Hoban took over and kept the firm going.

The Hoban Rifle Company made the Model 45 (for the year of its introduction) from 1945 until 1948. The rifle was a short, long or long rifle-single shot, boy’s rifle.
In the 1950s, a German-made, reverse-engineered metric copy marked “United Arms Company, Chicago 20” was also made for a brief period. Both relatively cheaply made rifles are now considered collectibles and, while not high priced, are in some demand.

During production of the gun it was offered as a promotional for a product called;
(WHITE CLOVERINE) The can was white with a clover on it. If you sold certain amount of cans, you would get this gun free. White Cloverine, was used to ease the pain of minor burns, scalds, sunburns, and windburn.

Have Fun, I love mine

LProuse
November 24, 2006, 02:21 PM
I got one of these back in '48 or so by selling the salve that was referred to.

I put a ton of Winchester Super X .22 shorts through it and took many a squirrel and rabbit.

The barrel is not in great shape but the rifle is still in my gunsafe. Nice to learn about the "ole Hoban"!

My son found all this info for me.

Lyle Prouse

zakattack
February 8, 2008, 05:59 PM
Does any one know how to get a bolt for this?

DAVIDMEA
July 16, 2008, 07:39 PM
I found one of these rifles while cleaning out my father in laws garage after his death. I just now decided to look up the history on it. This one is still in fairly good condition and still shoots straight. I don't want to sell it, but is nice to know what the value is.

45Broomhandle
October 30, 2009, 07:38 AM
United Arms of Chicago imported very few of the German-made Hoban 45 clones. The ad below ran only as part of a full page United Binocular ad in The American Rifleman magazine, Sept. 1953 issue. As far as I know this is the only year the ad ran. Parts of the two guns are NOT interchangeable.

It's been estimated that only a few hundred of the German clones were imported. It was not a big seller, even at $14.95.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v635/mauser/HAMILTON/AMERRIFLEMANDEC1953003_edited.jpg

Below is a photo of my original Hoban 45 compared to my United clone. Can you tell which one is which?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v635/mauser/HAMILTON/HOBANSBOTH002_edited.jpg

Jim Perkins' 1948 publication, American Boys' Rifles 1890-1945, has a lengthy, detailed story of John Hoban's buying of the Hamilton machinery, starting his company, and his subsequent demise in 1949. Jim's account of this time period does not completely agree with that outlined above by another poster.

Best regards ~ ~ ~ 45Broomhandle

As an American I am not so shocked that Obama was given the Nobel Peace Prize without any accomplishments to his name, but that America gave him the White House based on the same credentials. ~ ~ ~ Newt Gingrich

TwoBears
January 19, 2010, 03:31 PM
I can probably get one for you, but it will be pricey. Write to me at kb0caq@yahoo.com (That 3rd character is a zero not a letter) kb zero caq

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