What tool to break down a Buck Mark?


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P. Plainsman
July 20, 2004, 09:37 PM
Hello, all. Quick question.

I've lost the teeny hexagonal wrench that came with my new Browning Buck Mark .22. (It's really just a hexagonal metal rod with a bend in it.) This tool is used to remove the screws on top of the barrel to break the gun down for cleaning.

Tried to use one of my smallest screwdrivers to turn the screws, but no dice. When I go to the hardware store to get a replacement tool, what should I ask for?

This gun is at about the 450-round mark, so it's overdue for a first takedown and cleaning. But without the little wrench, I can't do it.

Many thanks.

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iluvG.R.I.T.S
July 20, 2004, 10:04 PM
I've never had a browning but from what you described cant you just use a small Allen wrench?

Sylvilagus Aquaticus
July 20, 2004, 10:34 PM
First off, Welcome to The High Road.

It does use an Allen wrench.

(EDITED TO ADD)- It takes a 3/32 inch Allen wrench. I just checked with my Buck Mark.
(/edit)

If you need a replacement wrench, you could either contact Browning to obtain a replacement, take it to your Smiling Neighborhood Trusted Gunsmith, or get a set of quality standard Allen wrenches from your local hardware emporium. You never know when an assortment will come in handy.

Oh, try reassembling with a little Blue Locktite or other low-holding goo of a similar nature when you reassemble for cheap insurance. Please do yourself a favor and do not lose the washers under the screws.

It does not use a Torx wrench.

I took my new Buck Mark completely apart before its first trip to the range for a detailed inspection and cleaning/lube.

In the immortal words of John Muir, "Come to kindly terms with your (donkey) for it bears you".

Regards,
Rabbit.

Standing Wolf
July 20, 2004, 11:07 PM
A really, really big hammer will do the trick, too, but Allen wrenches are the first choice. Every household needs a set of them. It's a $5–$20 investment at any reasonably well stocked hardware store.

shep854
July 20, 2004, 11:15 PM
Be sure to get a 7/64 Allen wrench also, for the barrel attachment screw.

PS, if you're in a real hurry, a hacksaw will do wonders; just don't tell us about it:what:

P. Plainsman
July 20, 2004, 11:35 PM
Superb. You all dealt very graciously with my ill-concealed ignorance about basic tool stuff. "Oh, so *that's* what an Allen wrench is!"

As it happens, I only picked up my set of screwdrivers in the first place because I was becoming a new gun owner, so I might as well add some more tools...

PS: The Buck Mark's been great so far. (Mine's a Buck Mark Plus, with the wood grip and the Hi-Viz sight.) Hopefully my sunny view will remain after the first take-down.

Thanks.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
July 21, 2004, 11:21 AM
Heck---all I had to do to get my Buckmark to come apart----was shoot it.

hksw
July 21, 2004, 12:32 PM
Tried to use one of my smallest screwdrivers to turn the screws, but no dice. When I go to the hardware store to get a replacement tool, what should I ask for?

Hopefully, the flats of the bolts didn't get messed up.

Just go to your local hardware or department store and get yourself a set of hex wrenches from a reputable source like Allen, Bondhus, Eklind, etc. Get the set with the ball end too, these come in handy. If you get the 12 or 13 piece set, it should cover you for almost all jobs (not just firearms).

Thrash1982
July 21, 2004, 01:21 PM
This is a consistent problem at the Purdue University gun club. My first act as the new armorer is going to be to order new screws for the top piece as the heads are stripped from constant tightening and then locktite them in with blue locktite. This should prevent any problems with the screws coming loose.

CJ
July 21, 2004, 02:36 PM
Definately just pick up a decent complete set of allen wrenches. They're not that expensive, and seem to have many uses when taking things apart. Then again, I'm an engineer and am always taking things apart, so I may use them more than average, but they ARE a good basic tool to have available in your toolbox.

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