anyone hear if bryco was sold today?


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Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:02 PM
well what happend?
link to story
http://www.times-union.com/tu-online/apnews/stories/070904/D83NEBU81.shtml

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whm1974
August 12, 2004, 07:03 PM
the poor kid who was trying to buy it lost on the bid.

-Bill

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:06 PM
any links? That makes my day!

EricOKC
August 12, 2004, 07:07 PM
Correct me if i'm wrong but one must have a manufacturers license to own firearms factory, one has to be over 21 to own a handgun, and as he is 17 and doesnt have the proper license....

deej
August 12, 2004, 07:09 PM
From the kid's website:



Jacksonville, FL - Since last year's unanimous $50.9 million jury award to Brandon Maxfield, Bryco Arms has been playing a shell game with its assets to avoid paying for Brandon's health care while simultaneously attempting to reorganize under a new name. Today, the company and its founder Bruce Jennings were successful. Bryco Arms' plant manager Paul Jimenez offered the highest bid of $510,000 (significantly higher than the original $175,000 Bryco proposed as a fair price to Jimenez) for Bryco's gun making equipment and 75,000 defective guns.

...

http://www.brandonsarms.org/news040812.php



Here's another link... http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2004-08-12-gun-sale_x.htm

This kid should take the money he was going to use to buy Bryco and instead fund some TRUE gun safety programs. If the "babysitter" had EVER been exposed to safe firearms handling at summer camp, in scouts, whatever, he would never have tried to make the weapon safe by pointing it at the kid. Duh.

Can'thavenuthingood
August 12, 2004, 07:09 PM
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2004/08/12/national1517EDT0633.DTL

Paul Jimenez, Bryco's former foreman, purchased the company for $510,000, in spirited bidding that increased by $5,000 increments from the opening bid of $175,000.

Vick

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:10 PM
wait did this happen last week? Sorry I am lost.

Can'thavenuthingood
August 12, 2004, 07:20 PM
Bidding was today as I understand it.

Now do I go out and buy one of these cheapies to support the industry?
I wouldn't normally buy one but...................

I suspect there are already in the works a few "bills" to make babysitters licensed, certified and much safer. This is California.

I did make a suggestion to Nicole Parra, my Assembly woman that we ought to incorporate firearms training into the school curriculum or after school programs.

Home Economics includes safety :)

Vick

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:27 PM
okay i see whats going on now. Here is a quote from his web site. "Most experts agree that they have no legitimate military purpose, law enforcement purpose, target shooting purpose, hunting purpose or even plinking purpose. Their sole justification is "armed confrontation between individuals." They are designed to be concealed, which is illegal in most states. Many are sold with fingerprint resistant finishes."

CCW illegal in most states?
and he seems to be working the fact that the guns are cheap and defective, but I think the one he was shot by did work correctly right?

fletcher
August 12, 2004, 07:39 PM
any links? That makes my day!

Ditto. The only way I can describe this situation would be "owned".:p

Stickjockey
August 12, 2004, 07:40 PM
Fingerprint resistant finishes?:confused:

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:57 PM
For some reason I like cheap guns. Just to have I mean. I dont know why. Maybe I'll myself buy a new Bryco. You know they should make some rifles.

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 07:58 PM
the only Bryco's I have seen are Blued or chrome.

SDC
August 12, 2004, 08:17 PM
If I remember correctly, this kid's award was based on the fact that some shyster lawyer managed to convince a jury (with the collective IQ of a potato) that the fact that the pistol in question had to be taken "off safe" in order to be unloaded made it "INHERENTLY UNSAFE"; ie. Bryco was therefore responsible for the babysitter pointing a loaded pistol at this kid while he/she tried to unload it. If a jury can buy THAT garbage, how long until someone tries the same thing where a 1911 or a Hi-Power is involved?

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 08:18 PM
would it have been any differnt if it was a $1000 1911? Well the damage would have been more.

feedthehogs
August 12, 2004, 09:32 PM
Now do I go out and buy one of these cheapies to support the industry?

Would you buy a three legged chair?

A fan with one blade?

Just because its firearms theres no need to support a company that makes garbage as a product.

And please no preachin, well the poor can't afford anything better.

Thats a crap statement and always has been.

wasrjoe
August 12, 2004, 09:57 PM
The "poor" can afford High Points, and those only have butt-friggin'-ugly going against them. :)

Can'thavenuthingood
August 12, 2004, 10:45 PM
The poor don't get DOJ issued "Gun Stamps" and government surplus powder?

Yeah you're right, I didn't buy a Yugo cause I thought it was crap.

Isn't a three legged chair a milkstool?

A single bladed fan would be a sword.

I wouldn't buy those either.

Vick

SIGarmed
August 12, 2004, 10:53 PM
I'd like to see Bryco get their pistols CA DOG approved. I really hope they submit it and its passes. The bed wetters were crying in California about how too many pistols are passing the frivolous drop test to make a hand gun "not unsafe" and legal for sale in California. This travesty of a law was passed under the guise of public safety yet police are exempt and can have any "unsafe" pistol for issue.

Something like this happening would make my day. In fact maybe we should go on a letter writing campaign to Bryco.

Demon440
August 12, 2004, 11:17 PM
I like the idea of low end pistols for thoes that cant afford any better, but I do wish they would make a better product. Something like Highpoint. Ulgy, heavy, no frills but they go bang when you pull the trigger and they are very cheap. I actually dont know that Bryco's are that bad its just what eveyone says.

Standing Wolf
August 13, 2004, 12:02 AM
I think the one he was shot by did work correctly right?

Yep. The baby sitter was defective, not the gun.

Ironbarr
August 13, 2004, 12:53 AM
From different citations in this thread:

1. "The gun was deliberately designed so it couldn't be unloaded unless its safety was moved from "safe" to "fire.""

Structured engineering.

2. "A jury in Oakland, Calif., concluded that Bryco knew the pistol had a safety flaw."

Sold a bill of goods (or freely bought a bill of goods).

3. "...the gun-maker also was liable because the pistol could only be unloaded when its trigger safety catch was switched off."

Let's see - I personally know of three handguns where the designed method of "unloading" requires setting the "Safety" device "off". Also one other where design has it that NO (mechanical) safety device is required. There is assumed that there is a properly functioning mental safety device in use.
...and 75,000 defective guns.

...about 75,600 unassembled guns.Defective? Hmmmm... When the safety was disengaged and the trigger operated, it properly applied the appropriate mechanical work necessary to strike the cartridge primer and thus induce the launch of a missile.

I'd suggest that "unassembled guns" is closer to the truth than that of "defective guns".

It's truly a shame that someone had to be hurt - the boy really has been suffering, and it probably will continue. And perhaps Bryco did turn out less than tolerable products, but to call a safety design with a history of reasonably successful service across a broad spectrum of manufacturers and models - and the best part of a century - "a safety flaw", is an attrocious affront to reality. I'd have to assume that the defense didn't show the history, or the jury was indifferent to the facts.

We know an ND when we see/hear one. Too bad the folks involved - sitter, parents, trial participants - weren't tuned to what ND's are, and how they are eliminated.

.

Harry Tuttle
August 13, 2004, 10:53 PM
Teen Fails To Buy Gun Company
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., August 12, 2004
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/08/12/national/main635641.shtml

A California teenager left paralyzed in a shooting accident a decade ago failed Thursday in his bid to buy the company that produced the Saturday night special that changed his life.

Brandon Maxfield's final bid of $505,000 to buy Bryco Arms, one of the nation's leading makers of inexpensive guns known as Saturday night specials, fell short. He had wanted to acquire it in order to shut it down.

Paul Jimenez, Bryco's former foreman, purchased the company for $510,000, in spirited bidding that increased by $5,000 increments from the opening bid of $175,000.

In an earlier hearing, Jimenez was sold the Costa Mesa, Calif.-based company for $150,000, but the U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Jerry Funk reopened the bidding when he ruled that notice of the previous sale was not properly given to potential bidders.

Richard Ruggieri, who represented Brandon's Arms, the organization created to bid on the gun company, said Maxfield was very disappointed.

Jimenez refused to comment after the auction.

Bryco was forced into bankruptcy last year when Maxfield won a record $24 million judgment against the company, its distribution arm and its owner. A jury in Oakland, Calif., concluded that Bryco knew the pistol had a safety flaw.

Included in the purchase was about 75,600 unassembled guns. Maxfield hoped to buy the inventory, melt it down and create a sculpture from the metal.

Ned Nashban, the lawyer representing Bryco owner Bruce Jennings in the bankruptcy, had described Maxfield's acquisition attempt as a publicity stunt that only has delayed Jennings' efforts to settle his debts.

But Ruggieri maintained that Jimenez was only a front for Jennings.

When Maxfield was 7, a 20-year-old family friend who was baby-sitting thought he heard a suspicious noise and grabbed a gun from a dresser drawer. The baby sitter called the boy's mother, who instructed him to immediately unload the .38-caliber pistol. While trying to do that, the baby sitter accidentally pulled the trigger.

The bullet struck the boy, shattering his spine.

The Oakland jury assigned more than half the blame to the boy's parents and baby sitter, but said the gun maker also was liable because the pistol could only be unloaded when its trigger safety catch was switched off.

A trust established for the boy has collected $8.75 million from an ex-wife of Jennings and from the insurance company of a gun distributor. It had not collected any money from Jennings, who shuttered his factory, moved to Florida and put his manufacturing business into bankruptcy.

Ruggieri had set up a nonprofit organization to take donations over the Internet for Maxfield's hoped-for purchase, since the damages won from the accident could not be used for that purpose under the terms of the trust.

cracked butt
August 14, 2004, 02:59 AM
"Most experts agree that they have no legitimate military purpose, law enforcement purpose, target shooting purpose, hunting purpose or even plinking purpose. Their sole justification is "armed confrontation between individuals." They are designed to be concealed, which is illegal in most states. Many are sold with fingerprint resistant finishes."

Maybe someone should start some sort of pistol league or competition that requires the use of such pistols. It could be an IPSC class- Major, Minor, and Under $200.:D

WonderNine
August 14, 2004, 03:46 AM
I can't blame the kid on this one. He's 17, been a quad for the last 10 years of his life (that'll make ya bitter) and his head is filled with lawyer jello.

Treylis
August 15, 2004, 03:36 PM
...and 75,000 defective guns.

...about 75,600 unassembled guns.

Perhaps that's some kind of stealth claim that the guns are defective because they don't work when they're unassembled? ;-P

Treylis
August 15, 2004, 04:03 PM
I can't blame the kid on this one. He's 17, been a quad for the last 10 years of his life (that'll make ya bitter) and his head is filled with lawyer jello.

Sorry, I'm still blaming him. 17 is plenty old enough to think rationally and consistently. I'm sure if you went up to him right now and asked him if he'd be suing for ownership of a car manufacturer because he got into an accident, he'd go, "Oh, no, no, they just make cars!"

Firethorn
August 15, 2004, 05:55 PM
But isn't this how John Edwards made his money and reputation?

Doctor->Gun manufacturer
c-section->unload with safety on
Kid with lifetime disability->ditto(good sob story)

The jury probably felt 'evil gun' company can afford to pay the kid's medical bills, after all it wasn't his fault and the babysitter has effectivly no money.

How far was this appealed?

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