Looting after hurricane...


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Preacherman
August 16, 2004, 09:07 PM
From the St. Petersburg Times (http://www.sptimes.com/2004/08/16/Weather/Thieves_plunder_in_Ch.shtml):

Thieves plunder in Charley's aftermath

By WILL VAN SANT, Times Staff Writer

Published August 16, 2004

PUNTA GORDA - After the hurricane ended, the looting began.

Among the first targets, officials said, was the Charlotte Harbor Fire Department. Firefighters arrived early Saturday to find that their computers had been swiped in the night.

Charlotte County Sheriff's Office spokesman Robert Carpenter said his office is getting regular reports of looting from residents of the area's many storm-wrecked neighborhoods. Carpenter said his officers are responding when able, but that they are saddled with more pressing demands, such as caring for survivors.

"No question about it," he said. "We are behind on these types of calls."

The fear of looting is so widespread, many residents are staying in their damaged homes to protect their valuables. Emergency shelters have far fewer people than officials had expected given the extensive damage in Charlotte County.

With computers at the county jail not operating, Carpenter said he did not know how many arrests had been made. At the jail, sheriff's Capt. Tony Penland said four people had been taken into custody for suspected looting, but he did not know the specific charges against them.

In areas hit by Hurricane Charley here, a curfew from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. was in effect Sunday night to combat theft.

Carpenter said 50 to 60 of his officers would patrol the streets, aided by 1,500 National Guard troops sent to the area, as well as personnel from other agencies.

Over the weekend, 25 Remington rifle-toting Pinellas County sheriff's deputies were patrolling the streets of Port Charlotte, protecting the many businesses whose walls and roofs were gone and whose merchandise was exposed to view.

Many mobile home communities in Port Charlotte along the Peace River have been devastated. With walls and more blown away - and since many of the inhabitants are snowbirds summering up north - the homes make easy targets.

At the Harborview Park mobile home community, 45-year-old Peter Fernandes returned to his mother's damaged home early Sunday. It appeared to him as if the door had been jimmied.

"Sons of b------," Fernandes said. "They have no respect for people, even in times like these."

Down the road in the park sat Vietnam veteran Gary Snyder, drinking Miller High Life. Snyder, who was among only a handful in Harborview who rode out the storm, said residents were anxious about looters, but he was prepared.

"If I see 'em, I'll shoot 'em," he said. "They're gone. I'll tell 'em I had a flashback."

In nearby Palmetto Mobile Home Park, Susann Rivera, 76, was cleaning up the damage to her home. On Saturday, Rivera said, she had moved her valuables to her daughter's house in Cape Coral, where she is now staying.

What's left, she says, has no sentimental value, but she would prefer not to have her home violated once by Mother Nature and a second time by thieves.

"I'm hoping nobody is selfish enough to come in and loot," Rivera said.

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PMDW
August 16, 2004, 10:11 PM
"If I see 'em, I'll shoot 'em," he said. "They're gone. I'll tell 'em I had a flashback."

I think that usually works best when you don't voice your intent prior to carrying it out. :)

XLMiguel
August 16, 2004, 10:17 PM
Ya know, I just don't have a real big problem with stomping on human cockroaches (aka - looters). Feed 'em to the 'gators.

Yeah, steal the FD's computer, screw up thier abilty to respond. Could we perhaps find a manslaughter charge in there if some one died because they couldn't respond? Looters ae vermin and should be treated as such.:fire:

Given that the 'authorities' can't/won't respond, and can't be held liabable in any event, one should do what one has to do. And I a agree, don't advertize. S/S/S JMO.

RetardedMonkey
August 16, 2004, 10:25 PM
That is pretty darn slack, I mean, if they're not already devistated from a hurricane in the first place, they then arrive to work the following day and all the equipment they use is gone.
Definately, what was said before with the manslaughter charge, it's an "unintentional" (so to speak) form of killing someone if the fire service can't respond.
Looting should recieve a more harsh penalty than robbery as it's all the low-lifes that terrorise already terrorised people.
Throw them in jail, throw away the key.
-- RM

Standing Wolf
August 16, 2004, 11:28 PM
Seems kind of pecular: post-hurricane looters in Florida are in danger of being shot, but those Kerry and Edwards creatures, the most prominent looters in the land, get Secret Service protection.

aquapong
August 17, 2004, 01:00 AM
Not to downplay the looting of the fire dept, but the computers were likely not essential to the dept's ability to respond. I'm a volly ff and my dept has a few computers on a network as a method to have guys hang out there and reduce response time (I'm on one now) and a few on which the officers do reports and stuff. A really well off dept might have laptops in their rigs with preincident planning data. While that data is extremely useful, any good officer would know about and will have read up on the "bad sites" in his first due area.

Now if they were looting SCBA, rotary saws, hydraulic tools, etc...then they are hampering the dept's ability to respond effectively.

Regardless, if I was in a post natural disaster area and my neighbor shot a looter...I didn't see anything.

Sportcat
August 17, 2004, 07:42 AM
http://www.sptimes.com/2004/08/16/Weather/Thieves_plunder_in_Ch.shtml

Thieves plunder in Charley's aftermath
By WILL VAN SANT, Times Staff Writer
Published August 16, 2004

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PUNTA GORDA - After the hurricane ended, the looting began.

Among the first targets, officials said, was the Charlotte Harbor Fire Department. Firefighters arrived early Saturday to find that their computers had been swiped in the night.

Charlotte County Sheriff's Office spokesman Robert Carpenter said his office is getting regular reports of looting from residents of the area's many storm-wrecked neighborhoods. Carpenter said his officers are responding when able, but that they are saddled with more pressing demands, such as caring for survivors.

"No question about it," he said. "We are behind on these types of calls."

The fear of looting is so widespread, many residents are staying in their damaged homes to protect their valuables. Emergency shelters have far fewer people than officials had expected given the extensive damage in Charlotte County.

With computers at the county jail not operating, Carpenter said he did not know how many arrests had been made. At the jail, sheriff's Capt. Tony Penland said four people had been taken into custody for suspected looting, but he did not know the specific charges against them.

In areas hit by Hurricane Charley here, a curfew from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. was in effect Sunday night to combat theft.

Carpenter said 50 to 60 of his officers would patrol the streets, aided by 1,500 National Guard troops sent to the area, as well as personnel from other agencies.

Over the weekend, 25 Remington rifle-toting Pinellas County sheriff's deputies were patrolling the streets of Port Charlotte, protecting the many businesses whose walls and roofs were gone and whose merchandise was exposed to view.

Many mobile home communities in Port Charlotte along the Peace River have been devastated. With walls and more blown away - and since many of the inhabitants are snowbirds summering up north - the homes make easy targets.

At the Harborview Park mobile home community, 45-year-old Peter Fernandes returned to his mother's damaged home early Sunday. It appeared to him as if the door had been jimmied.

"Sons of b------," Fernandes said. "They have no respect for people, even in times like these."

Down the road in the park sat Vietnam veteran Gary Snyder, drinking Miller High Life. Snyder, who was among only a handful in Harborview who rode out the storm, said residents were anxious about looters, but he was prepared.

"If I see 'em, I'll shoot 'em," he said. "They're gone. I'll tell 'em I had a flashback."

In nearby Palmetto Mobile Home Park, Susann Rivera, 76, was cleaning up the damage to her home. On Saturday, Rivera said, she had moved her valuables to her daughter's house in Cape Coral, where she is now staying.

What's left, she says, has no sentimental value, but she would prefer not to have her home violated once by Mother Nature and a second time by thieves.

"I'm hoping nobody is selfish enough to come in and loot," Rivera said.
-----

"If I see 'em, I'll shoot 'em," he said. "They're gone. I'll tell 'em I had a flashback.":D :D

P95Carry
August 17, 2004, 07:51 AM
Looters are amongst the slime of the earth ..... anyone willing to try and profit from the misfortune of another - should I say ''parasitise'' even .. deserves no mercy.

Many are not impoverished and needy - they are pure opportunist scum - not far removed from dirtballs who plunder churches.. I hope all the guys down there are ready with a suitable ''welcome'' should slimeballs decide to try it on them.

Do you get the impression I hate looters? :(

Preacherman
August 17, 2004, 09:10 AM
Duplicate threads merged.

45 Carry
August 17, 2004, 09:58 AM
A news paper headline in St. Louis, after a tornado in the late 1920's, said it right;

"LOOTERS WILL BE SHOT."

foghornl
August 17, 2004, 09:59 AM
Looters don't even qualify for as decent a term as "parasite" .......

But my actual opinion of that class cannot be published on 'The High Road'


Hurricane Hugo...Charleston, SC September 21, 1989. Some [ahem] free-lance gatherers were reported to have wandered out during the eye of Hugo to appropriate things from various downtown stores. A few of them were not found after the back wall of Hugo came through.


Justice, as served up by Momma Nature....................

JamisJockey
August 17, 2004, 10:11 AM
It happened after Andrew (http://www.stormsurvival.homestead.com/looters_page1.html)
http://www.stormsurvival.homestead.com/files/looter_sign.gif

Sportcat
August 17, 2004, 10:14 AM
Thankfully there are only two entrances to my neighborhood. I've believe there are enough folks in my neighborhood that would be happy to protect those two entrances, and the surrounding perimeter, from looters if a disaster were ever to happen.

Lt. G
August 17, 2004, 01:16 PM
I've lived in Florida since I was five years old. I agree that looters are the scum of the Earth. I can't recall which hurricaine it was, but I remember Orange County Sheriff Dave Starr, (always thought that was a cool name for a Lawman!), on the black and white TV,(no remote, 4 channels), stating that "All looters will be shot on sight." endquote. That message was replayed a bunch and even made the front page of "The Sentinal Star" newspaper. Guess what? Never saw any follow up stories about any looters. God bless all law enforcement and military people for being out there on the "front lines" for us.
With Respect,
Lt. G

Redlg155
August 17, 2004, 01:39 PM
Two kinds of "looters" often pop their heads up.

The ones who you can shoot that try to steal your property and the ones you can't shoot when buying supplies to rebuild your property.

If I'm not mistaken, FLorida passed a law against businesses inflating prices to take advantage of folks, but I bet it still happens.

Good Shooting
Red

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