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Flash hider needed on Mini-14?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Gearhead Jim, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Gearhead Jim

    Gearhead Jim Member

    Feb 12, 2003
    I've got a new 580 series Mini-14 with the plastic stock. Found a flash hider (well, they call it a muzzle brake :scrutiny: ) that fits, doesn't change accuracy either way.

    On a gloomy, overcast day; my shooting buddy commented on the big ball of fire coming from the muzzle with no flash hider, installing the hider eliminated it in that lighting. But looking through the 1.5 power scope, I never noticed any flash even without the hider.

    Does anyone know what I would experience in full darkness without the hider? I don't need to hide my muzzle flash from someone 300 yds away, just avoid being blinded by muzzle flash when shooting through the scope at typical patrol rifle distances, 15-100 yds.

    If I don't really need the hider, than I'd like to remove it to make the rifle 2" shorter. My range is noise sensitive, don't want to experiment at night.
  2. PinnedAndRecessed

    PinnedAndRecessed member

    Aug 10, 2004
    Flash hiders, as you've correctly surmised, are not to hide the flash from the target. That's impossible, contrary to what those idiot ********** politicians say.

    Flash hiders are to prevent the shooter from being blinded.

    Not sure I've ever done that. But if your eyes have adjusted themselves to the dark, and if you shoot with both eyes open (with iron sights), my guess is you're going to disrupt your "night vision."

    First, functionally, we're talking about two different things. A flash hider and a muzzle brake may look similar, but perform separate functions, IIRC.

    Second, and this delves into the theoretical, the Ruger mini rifles suffer accuracy loss because of the way their barrels are constructed. Thin. So the addition of any kind of a weight, flash suppressor or muzzle brake, adds mass to the end of the barrel, thus reducing barrel "whip."

    There's a guy over here:


    ...........who reduces the length of the barrel, adds weight at the end, and lightens the trigger. All this is supposed to enhance accuracy.

    BTW, perfectunion.com is a forum dedicated to the Ruger mini rifles. You'd be amazed what you can learn there.
  3. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Senior Elder

    Sep 8, 2005
    The flash from a Mini-14 varies greatly depending on the powder in the ammo.

    In my experience, 5.56 NATO in low light can make a really big flash. .223 civilian rounds don't make much of one, even with high-velocity hunting ammo.

    I'm talking about late twilight or a dimly-lit indoor range, though, not just an overcast day.

    Bottom line: if you don't see the flash when you're shooting the gun, it doesn't matter. If it gets in your way, then you might think about a solution -- which can be just changing ammo in low-light conditions.

    IMO, flash hiders often end up on guns because people think, "they look badass," not because they're really necessary for any practical reason. There are exceptions, of course.
  4. sansone

    sansone Senior Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    north florida USA
    I think faster burning powder creates less flash because it is done burning when the bullet exits. I never shoot at night(unless it's a wildcat raping my female)sometimes I wonder if she goes lookin' for these big stray males:eek:
  5. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Elder

    Jan 19, 2006
    Happy Valley, UT
    My ranch rifle set off a huge fireball (visible mid-day) and concussion with 5.56. An m-14 style flash suppressor cured it. It was annoying to me.
  6. Neo-Luddite

    Neo-Luddite Senior Member

    Sep 13, 2006
    Northwest IL--the other 'Downstate'
    Powder types make the difference at night. Personally, if it's not in the way, leave it on.

    I should talk--I bought one (flash hider) and it sat in a box for 12 years until my father in law put it on for me.

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