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Letter to the public from an Officer

Discussion in 'Legal' started by TheFederalistWeasel, Dec 5, 2004.

  1. TheFederalistWeasel

    TheFederalistWeasel member

    Aug 1, 2003
    Watch out for the CSI effect. There is no machine that we can drop an eyelash into and come up with the DNA profile,fingerprints and mug shot of the owner in 2 minutes.

    When you see an emergency vehicle behind you with its lights and sirens on: pull to the RIGHT, and Stop. We are usually required to pass cars on the left.

    Dunkin' donuts has much better coffee than they do doughnuts.

    When you're driving in the fast lane and you see a cop behind you don't, go 5 mph's under the speed limit. We are not impressed by how safe of a driver you can be, we're trying to go help someone (or catch that guy in the SUV that just cut you off). Safely move over and let us pass by you, please.

    If you get a warning instead of a ticket from a motorcycle cop...go buy a lottery ticket, because you've already beaten the odds.

    When you see an officer conducting a traffic stop,[or with a suspect in handcuffs] it is generally not a good idea to approach him/her and ask for directions. If you do, don't expect the officer to be nice when he/she tells you to get lost, and don't expect the officer to take the time to
    explain. (this has happened to me twice)

    If a cop causes a car accident we usually get a ticket, and sometimes we get suspended. When is the last time you got 3 days off [without pay] for rear-ending a guy at Wal-mart.

    If you think you can fan all the pot smoke out of the car before we smell it, good luck.

    We know you've had more than 2 beers. I've never had two beers hit six parked cars and driven my car through the front doors of a Toys-R-Us, pissed my pants, and passed out with my foot on the gas.

    Here's how to get out of a ticket, don't break the law in the first place.

    If you drive a piece of junk car; this is why you're getting pulled over. In one week I pulled over 10 cars for minor equipment violations.
    8 out of 10 had no vehicle insurance,
    7 out of 10 had suspended drivers licenses,
    5 out of 10 had warrants, 2 out of 10 had felony warrants,
    and 1 out of 10 was a known sex offender with his 12 year old niece in the car without her mothers knowledge.
    Of the 2 out of 10 that didn't have any other violations, one was given a fix-it-ticket and the other was given a warning(and if you are trying to do the math many had multiple violations)

    If you've just been pulled over how doing 70 in a 35 Do Not greet the officer with what seems to be the problem, officer.

    We get coffee breaks too, and sometimes we run into stores and do some shopping during them.

    When you're the victim of a burglary take the time you spend waiting for the officer to find the model #'s and the serial #'s of the stuff that was taken.

    Some cops are just jerks, but take heart in the fact that other cops don't like them either. (Oh so true)

    If it's nighttime and you're driving a vehicle with tinted windows and I pull you over. It's not because of your skin color, I usually can't tell if the vehicle even has a driver until the windows rolled down.

    Cops make mistakes, and sometimes they are big mistakes.

    Some cops are bad, and sometimes they're real bad.

    Every time you hear on the news about people running away from a crazed gunman, someone's son or daughter in a blue or brown uniform is running TOWARD that crazed gunman.

    Yes it's true, cops usually don't give other cops speeding tickets. Think of it as an employee discount, perk or benefit, and unless you're a habitual speeder all you ever get is a fine.

    If your local police agency has a helicopter everyone knows it's loud and annoying, but did you know it can cover the same area as 15-20 patrol officers, and safely chase criminals that are driving 90 MPH through city streets. Many times the guy has no idea it's there and slows down.

    Your 5 year old kid getting pushed down by another 5 year old kid IS NOT a police matter, talk to the other kids parents.

    If your kid won't do his homework or do his chores,911 is not the answer for a uniformed second-string parent.

    If you hit your spouse in front of your children,your children will hit their spouse in front of their children.

    Police work is...writing reports.

    If you rob a gas station you're only going to get $20, but I get to see a K-9 dog use your arm as a chew toy. For all I care you can keep the $20.

    In 1 year of patrol work in a large city only about 10 minutes would be cool enough to be on the television show, COPS. But if COPS was about report writing and accident reports each show would
    be a year long.

    Every traffic stop could end in gunfire, but we have to be polite and professional until that time.

    I've taken about the same amount of men/women to jail for domestic violence, so NO it's not always the man.

    People love fire fighters.

    Attention Victims: I need to know the WHO,WHAT,WHERE,WHEN, and HOW. Not what meds you're on or what your 15 cats have peed on.

    Some cops don't like to be called cops. I don't know why, but most don't care -- we've been called worse.

    If you find crack pipes in the ladies purse, there is a good chance they belong to her.

    Cops know you pay taxes and that your taxes pay cops' salaries. Cops also pay taxes, which also pay cops' salaries so, hey, this traffic stop is on me. Now sign here; press hard your making five copies.

    And a Variation On The Above --- Irate Offender: My tax money pays your salary, so you work for me! LEO: I pay taxes, too, so I figure I'm self-employed.

    When you see an officer walk into the room, a polite greeting of Hello, how are you? is much more appropriate than, Uh-Oh Jim, it looks like they're here for you! or putting your arms up and exclaiming, I didn't do it! It will surely save you from looking like an unoriginal horse's arse.

    If there are police cars, fire trucks, or ambulances at your neighbor's house then there is a problem. You don't need to meddle into your neighbor's business by asking us what's happening. Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy. If it's something that YOU need to worry about, we would've knocked on your door and told you.

    Remember that you and I enjoy the benefits of Constitutional rights. And so does the guy you suspect of stealing your stuff. No, I can't go search his house for your property just because you suspect he might be involved.

    No, I don't know your cousin who's a police officer in (fill in location anywhere in the US) (We Don't All Know Each Other

    No your crappy band doesn't have until 10:00pm to blast your crappy music out of that garage.

    If I can see a 12 year old in your house finishing off a beer with a bong hit I don't need a warrant.

    If you don't know what the speed limit in your neighborhood is what makes you think it's 65.

    If a neighborhood association asks for police to start ticketing in their neighborhood, one of the first five ticketed
    is on the board of the association.

    When you're blocking an area to traffic (both foot and vehicle), "No, you can't go that way" doesn't
    mean, "You're special, so by all means, go ahead."

    If an officer is standing in front of you with his hand outstretched, waving furiously at you, plus he's yelling for you
    to "Stop", it's usually a good idea to do as he asks. Please don't keep driving towards the officer (as happened to me the other night).

    Flares + cruiser parked at an angle equals a place you can't go, even if it's a ramp to the interstate.

    Don't run from the police and then attempt to hide in a warehouse. Especially don't do this if the officers tell you that the dog is going to be let loose, as this will generally result in the dog winning. They leave some pretty marks, by the way.

    Stop resisting means exactly that. Don't say "I'm not resisting" as you throw a punch at the officer's face.

    Just because you're handcuffed doesn't mean you won't go on the ground if you attempt to assault an officer. We don't even make exceptions for pregnant women who bite us, either.

    Did you really think I wasn't going to find that large lump of crack you got clenched in your butt? Come on, it's either the world's largest 'roid, or you got something you ain't supposed to have.

    If they tell you they borrowed the jacket from a friend, just before you search it, they've got something, and it's still gonna be their jacket.

    For some reason, you think I'll believe it when you tell me that you don't know how it got there. (see above)

    Stopping a green man in a blue shirt and pink pants a block away from an armed robbery when the suspect description is a
    green man in a blue shirt and pink pants...IS NOT racial profiling.

    Just because you have your hazard lights on, doesn't mean it is okay to park in the fire lane and run into the store. Even
    if you really need milk!

    No I will not go get your 6 year old from their friends house, because it is 1:00am and you don't want to drive 3
    minutes. Maybe you should set a curfew, and enforce it. I am not a bad police officer, you're a bad parent.

    And Last but not least: 99% of Police Officers do their job honestly and with great pride, we try to do our job

    Often we have to work in environments where we are the only ones that have to follow the rules.

    A veteran Sergeant told me on my first day of patrol when you wear that uniform everything you do is a liability.

    We do make mistakes and due to the nature of the job sometimes they have horrible results.
  2. Moondoggie

    Moondoggie Active Member

    Aug 22, 2004
    Small Town, Nebraska
    Amen and Amen!

    I was a reserve officer for 2 yrs...was offered a full-time position but knew that I'd never last to retirement. I could see the burnout factor loud and clear. It was a cut in pay from my regular civilian employment.

    The downside for me was the depression factor of most of the folks we dealt with. 90% definately weren't happy to see us, and most of them weren't bashful about letting us know that. Nobody was "ready for company" when we arrived...gawd, does everybody live like a slob??? Are there any happily married responsible folks left on the planet? Oh, yeah...and the parents....geeesh! Even in a town of 15K in South Dakota there was a significant % of folks who just weren't going into handcuffs without a fight simply as a matter of course. Of course, WE were the dirty, no good, SOB's who roughed 'em up in the process.

    One of the highlights was having the judge stop the tape of our conversation with a DUI suspect to ask him "Is that you refering to MY police officer as a *&%$#!!"? When he responded in the affirmative the judge immediately sentenced him to 3 days for contempt of court; for cursing at an "Officer of the Court" in the performance of his duties. "Frontier Justice" I guess.

    Anyway, I hear 'ya! And thank you for your service!!!

    Be careful out there!
  3. Brick

    Brick Member

    Sep 24, 2004
  4. longrifleman

    longrifleman Active Member

    Feb 11, 2004
    western Missouri
    I'll chip in a few bucks too. Cheap entertainment. :evil:
  5. fjolnirsson

    fjolnirsson Participating Member

    Jan 21, 2004
    Oregon, in the Willamette Valley
    Awesome! :D
    Thanks for that. Quite a fun read. If more folks would take the time to go through citizens academies...
    Well, I guess we'd have a lot more knowitalls who have been through a citizens academy. ;)
  6. Moparmike

    Moparmike Senior Member

    Jun 8, 2003
    Oddly enough, a downwardly-plunging firey handbask
    I agree with about 95% of that. And the only time I am not happy to see an officer is when I am in a car. Maybe its because the ones around here love to tailgate you (and they get so close that I can barely see headlights) to intimidate you into screwing up. Last week was the first time in 5 years that I hadn't had one light me up when he tailgated me. I guess he had better things to do... :cuss:

    I agree entirely. However, exactly how are you supposed to enforce this sort of thing when grounding rarely works because your kid has gizmos in his room and doesnt get out much, and spanking is only allowed by the state? It almost seems like discipline isnt allowed anymore.

    Sorry, this turned into a bit of a rant. *sigh*
  7. nhhillbilly

    nhhillbilly Active Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    this is one of the best I have seen.
  8. Rich K

    Rich K Active Member

    Aug 24, 2004
    SE Michigan
    One of the very best that I have seen.I interact with police officers every day,and the attitude of the general public towards them,or anyone in a public service profession,always amazes me.We are all jerks,until they get a boo-boo,or someone takes theirlollypop.Then we are heroes who come to their rescue.I applaude your service ,Sir,and thank you for doing a very tough job.God bless you,and all in your profession.
  9. Declaration Day

    Declaration Day Active Member

    Feb 25, 2004
    Redford, Michigan
    "If there are police cars, fire trucks, or ambulances at your neighbor's house then there is a problem. You don't need to meddle into your neighbor's business by asking us what's happening. Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy. If it's something that YOU need to worry about, we would've knocked on your door and told you."

    This reminds me of an amusing summer at my neighbor's house.

    I had a crackhead living next to me, and he fit the description of many of the lowlives on COPS. Mullet, bandanna, no shirt EVER, looked like the living dead, that was him.

    Anyway the local police were at his house atleast once a week, either for a drug bust or domestic violence. Often it involved a new girlfriend who moved in right away and then left a week later after said crackhead beat her.

    Eventually, since the cops were often there for 30-60 minutes while everything was resolved, I began to talk to them and they would tell me everything that happened.

    I even fired up the grill many times and offered them burgers and hot dogs. They were a good bunch of guys.

    The neighbor has long since had his home foreclosed upon. I don't miss him one bit, but it was interesting to be close to the action.
  10. kayak bum

    kayak bum New Member

    Sep 2, 2004
    East Coast
    Wow! People in other jurisdictions say and do these things too???

  11. docfubar

    docfubar New Member

    Jun 21, 2004
    Tooele Utah

    Do you mind if I copy this and print it out to show my LT and my acadamy class?
  12. joeoim

    joeoim New Member

    Dec 27, 2002
    Western Colorado
    Good read, Thanks for sharing.

  13. Chuck Dye

    Chuck Dye Active Member

    Dec 24, 2002
    Oregon-The wet side.

    Thank you for the rant about tail gaters in patrol cars. Thought you might have fun with one of my favorite gags. I am a long haul trucker and have more opportunity than most to observe such driving. On occasion, I will get on the CB (Children’s Band) and, in my cheesiest movie Mexican accent proclaim, "Following deestance? We don’ need no steenking following deestance! We haf badches!" Now highway patrol officers who still listen to a CB are few and far between but every once in a while I get a very satisfying reaction!

    You may use this without attribution. :D
  14. Flyboy

    Flyboy Participating Member

    Apr 19, 2004
    Oklahoma City, OK
    At the same time, when there are six squad cars in my apartment complex's parking lot, and a dozen cops crawling around the complex, I do think I have a need to know what's going on in and around my home, if only to know what to watch out for that warrants that many badges.

    --Flyboy, who really does appreciate the police, and who sent a man to jail not three hours ago
  15. Firethorn

    Firethorn Participating Member

    Feb 27, 2004
    You know, I kinda agree with Flyboy. Had a number of cops show up to pound on my neighbor's door (apartment). I just wanted to know if it would be a good idea to hide in my bathtub...
  16. Gifted

    Gifted Participating Member

    Jul 28, 2004
    You mind if I repost this in a few places where it would be appreciated?
  17. TheFederalistWeasel

    TheFederalistWeasel member

    Aug 1, 2003
    Okay, personal experience here from an officer who worked in South Atlanta.

    A lot of times when you have a situation unfolding which to quote Flyboy warrant that many badges around here, we the patrol officers who wear those badges in all actuality may, ourselves, not be completely sure what is going on, it may be the call just came out, shots fired in you apartment complex and we responded 6 deep, we just arrive on scene and most of us are staging outside or attempting to assess the need for a perimeter or we may have been told to standby by a supervisor and that’s what we are doing.

    On the other hand it may be a 10-78 call (Officer needs assistance) I which case I am only focusing on the Officer who just yelled for help and nothing else, ain’t got time to stop and chat with you.

    You rushing up to me asking what’s going on when I just heard my buddy screaming for help over the radio is not a good idea. You hear these guys day in and day out on the radio, normal tone, these are your friends, brothers and sister officers.

    To hear them literally screaming on the radio for backup 10-18, you go from sipping that cup of coffee bored to tears droning over the report you are writing, trying to put someone’s stupidity into words, to full blown Holy ????? adrenaline rush instantly.

    Also, who are you, why are you here, maybe you are part of the problem, creating a distraction etc… get the idea?

    Best thing to do in your case is assume the worst, go to your SHTF plan and either GTHOFD or shelter in place until the all clear has sounded.

    When in doubt go and hide in that bathtub.

    Not trying to be mean by any means just being real.
  18. TheFederalistWeasel

    TheFederalistWeasel member

    Aug 1, 2003
    This is not my work; I should have stated that in the original post.

    I’m sorry.

    I took this from a LEO board I am a member of and posted it in its entirety here
  19. pax

    pax Mentor

    Dec 24, 2002
    Washington state
    Several years ago, my husband and I lived in a tiny little rundown house in a rotten neighborhood, because we were saving up to buy a house of our own.

    Coming home from church one day, we rounded the corner to our place and found a dozen patrol cars -- from different jurisdictions, yet -- pulling into the area. There were officers on foot wearing black from head to toe, complete with ski masks and toting long guns and a dozen officers piling out of the back of some kind of paddy wagon/van thing.

    Bob and I looked at each other, then he put the car in reverse and we went out to lunch. I figured I'd rather read it in the paper the next day than watch it live.

    There wasn't room for both of us (and our three small children) in the bathtub. And the tub was made of fiberglass ... :uhoh:

  20. RevDisk

    RevDisk Participating Member

    Apr 27, 2004
    Na. The worst is when you get pulled over and the cop says "Wait a second, aren't you (my last name)? You're in Sergeant's (my boss' last name) unit?" The cop then proceeded to call my boss over the radio, and my boss smoked me for about 15 minutes.

    From the look of the drivers of passing vehicles, it's like they've never seen a Sergeant smoking a private with UP-DOWN-GO's in the freezing cold. I wish he'd have just given me the ticket...


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