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Pricing error - what would you do?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by FunYet, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. FunYet

    FunYet Member

    Dec 29, 2002
    Oh Hi Oh
    Oh the pain of honesty.

    I was at a gun show over the weekend and saw the usual collection of overpriced handguns. I was actually there looking for ammo. In one showcase I saw a gun marked "S&W 642" priced at $349.00, which seemed to be the going rate for 642s at this show. The thing about this 642 is, it was really a 640! Same basic design; hamerless, J-Frame, but the 640 is stainless and shoots .357. I hovered around the show for a while trying to decide if I should a) buy the gun at this great price even though I didn't really NEED a 640, though I've wanted one for a while, or b) point out to the dealer that he had mismarked on of his guns, c) just forget about it. I never did have to make a choice. I finally wandered back to the table after 45 minutes or so to look at the gun again and someone was buying it. I don't know what price he was getting.

    What would you have done?
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2006
  2. jcims

    jcims New Member

    Dec 13, 2005
    That's when it's at its best.

    Decisions, left alone, will make themselves <que Freewill>.

    I'll tell you if you tell me what you're going to do next time first. :)
  3. redneck2

    redneck2 Mentor

    Dec 25, 2002
    Northern Indiana
    If it's a good deal and you want it, buy it

    The guy's a dealer. It's not like you're taking advantage of widows and orphans. Maybe he didn't have a lot in it and wanted to move it. Maybe they're not that popular. Maybe he's got 6 of them and needs to thin the herd.

    In legal terms, he's in a professional position and considered to have more knowledge than the average person. He should use it.
  4. HighVelocity

    HighVelocity Senior Member

    Jan 18, 2005
    IDPA junkie in DFW, TX
    If it makes you feel any better, I got my 640 for $300 so maybe it wasn't mispriced at all.
  5. EddieCoyle

    EddieCoyle Participating Member

    Sep 17, 2005
    He's a dealer. Whatever he's selling it for, he got it for less. He is making a profit that he's happy with. I'd make him happy by buying it.
  6. f4t9r

    f4t9r Senior Member

    May 27, 2005
    Thats why you go , to find a good deal !!
  7. Snagglepuss

    Snagglepuss Member

    Dec 4, 2005
    If its a good deal to you always buy it. These guys are dealers out to make money. I doubt he would have let you know if you sold him a gun at to low a price.
  8. Majic

    Majic Mentor

    May 3, 2003
    It was the dealer's revolver and he priced it. Why try to educate him about the price? There could have been several issues why it was priced lower. If you wanted it and it passed inspection then buy it, other wise walk on by and pay it no mind.
  9. Dr.magnum

    Dr.magnum New Member

    Nov 17, 2005
    S.W. Missouri
    I went to a pawn shop a few years ago and saw a 12ga semi-auto shotgun that some Bubba had painted green, presumably it was home made camo. The gun was priced at $89. I almost didn't look at it, assuming it was some junker, but decided to have a closer look. It was a pre-64 Winchester Model 50.
    I bought it;)
  10. Moonclip

    Moonclip Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2005
    That is not so screaming a deal I'd feel guilty about it. Dealers charge what they want and sometimes the prices I have paid on guns at a dealer were so good you would not believe me.
  11. Vitamin G

    Vitamin G Active Member

    Aug 9, 2003
    Monroeville, PA (Home of the Zombies)
    For a second I thought this was going to be about the usual mislabeled ammo at wal-mart. I agree that dealers will never sell a gun for less than they paid for it, so go for any good deal you see.

    As for wal-mart and mislabeled ammo... Some people might take the high road, but i'd buy all they had and request a rain check for more...
  12. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Senior Elder

    Sep 8, 2005
    I think that's roughly the going price for the things here, retail.

    Not a BAD price, but not like it was marked $250, either.
  13. Ankeny

    Ankeny Senior Member

    Jun 27, 2003
    I have seen guns I thought were mismarked. The last time around I asked the guy if the gun was priced right (with one of those gee that seems high attitiudes). The dealer told me the price was right and he wouldn't come down. I bought the gun, a slightly used Les Baer PII for $750.00. Assuming he didn't mismark the gun, he really screwed somebody.
  14. MarshallDodge

    MarshallDodge Senior Member

    Nov 7, 2005
    Utah, USA
    I would have bought it without feeling any remorse.

    Recently, I bought a Mossberg 590A1 for $210 at a pawn shop. It was marked for $300 and I asked if she could do better on price. I was thinking about offering $250 when she said that they were having a 30% off sale and she gave me the discount.

    I assume they made a profit and the seller and buyer were both smiling. Can you imagine what they gave the person that pawned it or sold it outright?
  15. Stainz

    Stainz Senior Member

    Apr 24, 2003
    Pinson, AL
    Here is a better one. 'Academy Sports/Outdoors', a Waco, TX based chain, has several local stores. They sell 115gr FMJ 9mm Blazers for $3.86/50. One chap from the range where I work part time as a RO, went through the checkout with a case of 20 boxes. She ran the UPC barcode over the scanner, and it rang up $3.86 - for the case! He went back... as did several others, including one LEO. I am sorry, to me, it was stealing - and I reported it to the manager of my local store, admittedly not the one they had used, but reportedly one where a dealer had pulled the same trick. Now they don't sell any full cases - even bricks of ten boxes of .22LR are broken up. It came back to bite me - one checkout girl opened my last box of shotgun clays, most of which were broken (Good for me, actually, as I left them!). I guess she was going to charge me the box price for each clay!

    I would probably have quized him briefly re that gun price - and, had I wanted it, bought it. In general, nothing is sold by a dealer at a show for less than what a local gunstore will sell it... and bought locally, you'll likely have an easier time with warranties, etc. I buy some reloading supplies, when they are available, at local shows, as not much else seems fairly priced these days.

  16. CAS700850

    CAS700850 Participating Member

    Jul 20, 2004
    Central Ohio
    I was once told that real honor is doing the right thing when there's no chance that you would be cuaght if you did the wrong thing. Discuss with the guy. Maybe it was the price he wanted, and he just made a mistake writing the model number down. Maybe he'd reward your honesty by offering it to you at the listed price, even if it was in error. Maybe he was misled as to what it was worth, and you'll be helping him avoid a financial error that could hurt him. Maybe you'll make an acquaintance that will know your honesty and honor are beyond reproach, and you will be dealt with accordingly in the future.
  17. BillinNH

    BillinNH Member

    Jan 4, 2006
    New Hampshire
    In my opinion, if someone offers a product for a given price and someone buys it at that price, then that is a consummated good faith transaction. It is up to both parties to do due diligence as to the suitability of the transaction from their point of view. If he offers it at that price you can buy it at that price without any qualms. He is responsible for what price he sells it for.

  18. DragonFire

    DragonFire Active Member

    May 26, 2004
    I guess if I saw too good of a deal, I'd question the dealer a bit.

    If your case, since the model was obviously wrong, I'd have pointed to the gun and the tag and asked if they went together.

    Could just be mismarked, or could have something wrong that you didn't find. Or could be the "bait and switch" tactic. Gets your interest with a mistagged sticker and tries to get you to still buy it for the "real" price.
  19. HankB

    HankB Mentor

    Mar 29, 2003
    Central Texas
    If a seller is a regular dealer and is selling something for less - even a LOT less - than what I think the going rate is, I'll normally jump on it; that's called bargain hunting.

    On the other hand, if the elderly widow woman down the street wants to sell her late husband's pristine pre-64 Model 70 or mint S&W .357 Registered Magnum, I'm not going to take unfair advantage of her by paying $25 and walking off with it . . . I still have to face the guy in the mirror every morning.
  20. C96

    C96 Member

    Mar 10, 2004
    Mid-Willamette Valley Oregon
    About thirty plus years ago the NRA held a big meeting and show in Salt Lake City.

    Stationed near the main entrance to the gun show portion was one of the leading
    experts on old Colt SAA's. This little old 80+ year old lady comes in carrying a SAA.
    She says she is wanting to get rid of it for a couple hundred or so. Says she found it
    in her attic and thinks it might have belonged to her dear departed husband.

    Expert carefully examines the gun and figures it to be worth about $25,000. :what:
    He doesn't tell her that but can't afford a proper price and is not willing to try to
    steal it and so passes on the deal.

    Two more "SAA experts" down the line get into a bidding war and one ends up
    paying her somewhere around three thousand for the gun.

    Turns out it was an extremely good forgery. The first expert in this tale is
    telling this tale in an article on firearm forgeries, particularly Colt SAA's.
    This particular forgery was so good it was detailed in this article to try to
    prevent this one from continuing on.

    So be careful of the innocent little old ladies as well.


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