Quantcast
THR Lemat club - Page 4 - THR
THR  

Go Back   THR > Tools and Technologies > Blackpowder Shooting

Welcome to THR
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have, access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!


If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit the help section.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 7, 2013, 12:48 AM   #76
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
IMHO the Pedersoli Howdah is more in the fantasy category as opposed to a true replica of a real item. Most true Howdahs used in India and Africa were cut down from Nitro Express double rifles. The Howdah looks like the double barrel Frontier Davy Crockett toy pistol that Hubley made in the 50s, based on early sxs 1800s flintlocks. That was my fav until Mattel came out with the Fanner 50 line.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 01:31 AM   #77
PRD1
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 24, 2008
Location: S.E. Arizona
Posts: 155
I'm pretty sure...

that non-cartridge firing arms are not covered by the provisions of GCA 34.

There are many smoothbore ML pistols currently available, some of which are not accurate copies of any particular original arm.

I'm also pretty sure that, were the provisions of GCA 34 applicable to percussion or flintlock arms, the current crop of short-barreled ML shotguns would not be available.

PRD1 - mhb - Mike
PRD1 is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 02:22 AM   #78
lionrobe77
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Melun France
Posts: 24
Interesting books I have.




- -

My own LeMat (replica) mildly customized
- -

-


A french friend made recently 2 good posts with a lot of photos of his original guns and others, but in our mother's tongue
I could use babelfish for translation, you can too, but the result would be pitiful, as you know.
My question : am I allowed to repost a text in french language ? Of course, I can try to translate some parts if any question....
???
lionrobe77 is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 02:27 AM   #79
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
I love this site. One day you're looking into a stale year old thread
Somebody from France posts a comic strip featuring the item your interested in
and pics of the burial site of the inventor of the item and winds up in a discussion
in a discussion of U.S. legal issues.
You gotta love this site...really. You can learn so much stuff.
How about the late 50s Western series The Ringo Kid, who carried
I think 2 Le Mats. I.looked all over for the pics of the
shooters used during the production. They were likely studio props since even in 1959 real
Le Mats were near priceless collectables and wouldnt be used.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 02:39 AM   #80
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
What a stunning case and original Le Mat. I have started making some
French velvet lined fitted revolver cases from wooden flatware cabinets off ebay. See what I meant from my previous post?...down the rabbit hole we go.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 03:17 AM   #81
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
I found a production still of the Ringo Kid with his "Le
Mat". I'll try to post it. DANG cant post pic from my
phone and my laptop os dead. Just search The Ringo
Kid tv on imdb and there is a photo with him drawing. I think its a prop,
made from a six shooter, but it does have a bunch
of cylinder bore holes and closely resembles a
real Le Mat. The running gag on the show was that the
bad guys would always assume he had run out of rounds after
after 6 shots, but he had 3 left in the cylinder and another
in the smoothbore. The bad guys would simply throw up their
arms and give up. FUN STUFF
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 04:03 AM   #82
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
The still of the Ringo's Le Mat appears to have at least 6 boreholes on half of the
cylinder face, which makes since if it was mocked up from a 6 shooter. There is entire
episode on youtube called The Posse. The stock show intro shows Ringo
firing 6 shots then firing the shotgun barrel, so the gag was that
it was a 7 shooter. One scene shows Ringo cleaning and loading
the shooter. He asks his deputy for a 410 shell. The
shooter is a breaktop revolver with six brass cartridges and a
central 410 shotgun barrel made up by the studio
armorer probably. Even so, its pretty cool.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 09:10 AM   #83
snidervolley
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 23, 2011
Posts: 31
lemat

the Johny Ringo tv lemat is an original percussion lemat converted to cartridge with a top break (albeit flimsy ) break open DOA!.
p..s. love the cartoons comics details they even got the rammer pooping up on firing awesome, thanks

Last edited by snidervolley; June 7, 2013 at 09:49 AM.
snidervolley is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 09:20 AM   #84
snidervolley
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 23, 2011
Posts: 31
i am finishing up on my lemat and cant wait to take it out and actually see what it can do(havin some probs with timing.?)

Last edited by snidervolley; June 7, 2013 at 09:26 AM.
snidervolley is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 09:30 AM   #85
snidervolley
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 23, 2011
Posts: 31
[IMG][/IMG]
back sight in work and stock sling ring ,and getting the chamber timing back on track(not fun) ?

Last edited by snidervolley; June 7, 2013 at 09:41 AM.
snidervolley is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 09:59 AM   #86
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
Very nice work on the carbine. I'm thinking about adapting a Pedersoli Howdah pistol detachable stock to my LM. The geometry and lines are a close match to the LM grip. That would fit into my collection of detachable stock revolvers well: 1851 Colt, 1848 Dragoon, and 1858 Remmie Buffalo "Fantasty".

Also I found a site that describes in detailed pics the Johnny Ringo LM, acquired by the show's producer Dick Powell from Harrahs back in the 50s and I guess converted back then?????

Also, one of the show's directors was Paul Henreid, who played Victor Lazlo, in Casablanca, a French actor I believe.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 11:09 AM   #87
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
Le Mat detachable stock idea

Pic of my detachable stock idea.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg plmwps.jpg (19.5 KB, 20 views)
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 12:41 PM   #88
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
My LM shoulder holster

Quick cross draw shoulder rig made from over chest belt threaded through two slits in a long sleeve shirt and a Triple K Walker Colt leather holster, worn over a t shirt w/ the shirt buttoned up. No visible means of support...kind of like my last girlfriend.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20130605_031655 (1).jpg (151.4 KB, 21 views)
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 01:50 AM   #89
lionrobe77
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Melun France
Posts: 24
Not sure if Howdah shoulderstock fits or not for LeMat (any other idea ?), but at least for a schofield (replica) after some work












lionrobe77 is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 07:25 AM   #90
mykeal
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 9, 2006
Location: Michigan
Posts: 5,049
What's the LOP on those?
mykeal is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 08:57 PM   #91
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
That's what I'm talking about. Nice looking shooter. stock, and box. I went to my local Cabelas and took a lot of measurements of the Howdah grip and a took pics of the grip shape. The grip cross section and curve of the Howdah grip matches the Le Mat nearly perfectly. Dittto on mykeal's request for the LOP. I might have to get a shooter like yours AND a Howdah to justifiy buying a stock that fits 3 shooters.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 12:51 AM   #92
lionrobe77
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Melun France
Posts: 24
To be honest, and it would probably be the same for the LeMat, the shooting with the shoulderstock is a pain in the ass, in the sense that you receive the blast of ashes (sorry, can't find appropriate words) directly in the face.
Cant' explain why, but I have'nt at all this problem with my Walker....?

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthrea...41028&page=141
lionrobe77 is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 09:37 AM   #93
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
hMMM...I don't have that problem with either my 1858 Remmie Buffalo .44 or 1851 Navy .36 repros using an Italian repro Colt-style stock and Pyrodex bp substitute. I haven't heard of anybody complaining about the Pedersoli stock with the Howdah, except that the stock was too low for proper line of sight in some of the earlier production runs of the stocks, which has now been fixed. My Cabelas didn't have a Howdah stock to measure to compare length and line of sight.

What's the length of the stock from the back edge of your Schofield's grip to the end of the butt. Maybe it's just really short and puts you too close to all of the "action". Perhaps I will not pay the $200 for the Howdah stock and just hit ebay for a nice rifle stock and cut it down to fit with a proper line of sight and put my face further back.
I have been thinking about the Le Mat stock since I got this shooter. I initially came up with a design consisting of metal strap drilled and tapped with two holes that would attach to the backstrap of the grip via tapped holes near each end of the bracket. The metal strap would be attached to the stock first via holes and long wood screws drilled through the bracket. I only thought of the Howdah stock because of its period look and that I wouldn't necessarily have to drill and tap the grip of the Le Mat.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 09:42 AM   #94
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
hMMM...I don't have that problem with either my 1858 Remmie Buffalo .44 or 1851 Navy .36 repros using an Italian repro Colt-style stock and Pyrodex bp substitute. I haven't heard of anybody complaining about the Pedersoli stock with the Howdah, except that the stock was too low for proper line of sight in some of the earlier production runs of the stocks, which has now been fixed. My Cabelas didn't have a Howdah stock to measure to compare length and line of sight.

What's the length of the stock from the back edge of your Schofield's grip to the end of the butt. Maybe it's just really short and puts you too close to all of the "action". Perhaps I will not pay the $200 for the Howdah stock and just hit ebay for a nice rifle stock and cut it down to fit with a proper line of sight and put my face further back.
I have been thinking about the Le Mat stock since I got this shooter. I initially came up with a design consisting of metal strap drilled and tapped with two holes that would attach to the backstrap of the grip via tapped holes near each end of the bracket. The metal strap would be attached to the stock first via holes and long wood screws drilled through the bracket. I only thought of the Howdah stock because of its period look and that I wouldn't necessarily have to drill and tap the grip of the Le Mat.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 10:32 AM   #95
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
Your Walker with shoulder stock questions

I caught your post and pics in the Walker Club you mentioned here. I was considering mounting a modded Italian detachable shoulder that perfectly fits both my Pietta 1851 Colt Navy and 1858 Remmie Buffalo stock right out of the box to a Walker or 1st Series Dragoon for versatility. Some of the old hands here say can't be done without some major work: including frame is way too wide for the stock mounting hardware, stock has to fit on a drilled 4th frame screw like on the 3rd Dragoon, the recoil shield would have to be cut both sides of the frame, the grip is too long for the hook to work, etc. Yesterday I went and measured a Colt 2nd generation 1st Model Dragoon I was considering purchasing using a machinist caliper.
The stock brass mounting hardware is definitely not wide enough for the Dragoon frame and grip, but not by much. There is still enough meat in the brass mounting hardware to allow removal of some material to fit around the frame still allow engagement of a longer hammer screw. I would have to measure carefully but if done properly I think I could still use the stock for my other shooters.
Your pics on your Walker appear follow the same idea I had with your Walker grip notched for the Italian repro stock hook. Anything else I should know about this mod?
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 01:15 PM   #96
lionrobe77
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Melun France
Posts: 24
With my terrible english, and my 2 left hands, it's a bit difficult to say more. I know that my friend needed to enlarge slightly the shoulderstock.
OK, please, let me know if a french text is offending or not, so I'll edit, or I'll try to translate some parts or answer if any questions ????

A friend of mine made once this post :

Le Dr Le Mat et ses revolvers à percussion

Arme de poing à la silhouette incomparable et reconnaissable au premier regard, le revolver Le Mat à percussion est un symbole à lui tout seul.
Sa simple évocation emporte le collectionneur dans un tourbillon vers le passé ou se mêlent les images romantiques et celles, tragiques, de la terrible guerre fratricide qui déchira les Etats-Unis de 1861 à 1865.


1) LE GENIAL INVENTEUR


Né à Bordeaux le 21 Avril 1821, Jean Alexandre François Le Mat se destine d’abord à devenir prêtre. Au bout d’un an, il change radicalement l’orientation de sa vie et décide de faire des études de médecine, sanctionnée par un diplôme de la faculté de Montpellier le 15 juillet 1842. Il travaille alors pendant 16 mois à l’hôpital militaire de Bordeaux avant de quitter la France pour rejoindre la Louisiane. C’est ainsi qu’il arrive à la Nouvelle Orléans le 7 février 1844.
Plutôt que d’exercer la médecine, il choisit la voie des inventions, du commerce et des affaires.
De 1844 à 1859, il fut impliqué dans le commerce de tabac vers la France, se maria avec la fille du plus important banquier de la ville, développa d’importantes relations influentes, déposa plusieurs brevets d’inventions relatives au domaine maritime. Surtout, il forma un partenariat avec le Major Beauregard de l’US ARMY (formalisé le 4 avril 1859) et déposa le 21 Octobre 1856 un brevet révolutionnaire pour un revolver dont l’axe autour duquel tournait le barillet était un canon à âme lisse (« grape shot revolver »).







Les premiers prototypes de ce revolver ne seront construits qu’à partir de l’année 1859, ces rarissimes exemplaires seront manufacturés par l’armurier John Krider de Philadelphie.
Sept exemplaires sont actuellement recensés dans le monde, en plus d’avoir un design différent des armes produites en séries, ils sont marqués sur le canon : « MADE BY JOHN KRIDER PHILADA. LE MAT’S GRAPE SHOT REVOLVER PATENT ».








Grâce à l’appui du MAJ Beauregard, Le Mat tente de séduire les milieux militaires avec son nouveau revolver. Le 16 Avril 1859, le Dr Le Mat est promu aide de camp du Gouverneur de Louisiane et reçoit le titre honorifique de Colonel.

Le 9 mai 1859 le revolver est testé à l’arsenal de Washington et reçoit un accueil chaleureux de la commission, suggérant quelques ajustements mineurs et surtout que l’arme soit distribuée à titre de test sur le terrain aux formations de l’US Army.

Mais en cette période de paix, l’US Army n’est pas intéressée pour produire à ses frais ce revolver.
De mai 1859 à juillet 1860, le Maj Beauregard, en tant que représentant américain du partenariat avec Le Mat, prit contact avec toutes les principales entreprises d’armes à travers le pays en vue de faire construire ce revolver en série.
Pendant ce temps le Dr Le Mat effectuait les mêmes démarches en Europe.
Il est probable que les revolvers Kryder N°1 et N°2 aient servis de modèles de présentation pour les 2 hommes auprès des armuriers.
Ces revolvers Kryder sont très probablement les seuls revolvers Le Mat qui furent produits en Amérique.

Les 2 hommes se trouvaient alors dans une situation paradoxale, leur revolver pouvait potentiellement intéresser l’US Army mais ils n’étaient pas capables de réaliser la production industrielle de cette arme.

Le Mat s’associa alors avec un riche confrère Français, le Dr Girard, probablement dans le but de faciliter cette mise en production.
Cette association provoqua une brouille entre le Major Beauregard et le Dr Le Mat et aboutit à la dissolution de leur partenariat le 2 juillet 1860.
Ainsi naquit le nouveau partenariat entre le Dr Le Mat et le Dr Girard le 10 juillet 1860, le Dr Girard possédant alors 75% des parts de l’entreprise.
Après plusieurs mois de travail, les deux associés décrochèrent le 15 novembre 1860 leur premier contrat de 400 revolvers pour la Garde de la Nouvelle Orléans : une composante de la milice de Louisiane.
Avec le déclenchement de la guerre de sécession en 1861, cette commande sera incluse dans les futures commandes des armées de la confédération (le 12 Août 1861, le Dr Le Mat passa un contrat de 5000 revolvers)

Devant le peu de ressources industrielles du Sud, les associés décidèrent d’installer la fabrication dans une petite usine à Paris située au 9 passage Joinville à Paris, afin de produire leur revolver.
C’est ainsi que débute réellement l’histoire des revolvers Le Mat avec la production en série à Paris du célèbre modèle à percussion à destination des armées de la CSA (Confederate States Army). Certains auteurs affirment que les 450 premiers revolvers Le Mat furent produits à Liège et non à Paris : quelques zones de mystères persistent!


2) LES REVOLVERS LE MAT A PERCUSSION

Traditionnellement, les revolvers Le Mat à percussion sont classés en plusieurs modèles distincts, en fonction de leurs caractéristiques extérieures :

a) Les premiers modèles de revolvers Le Mat (numéro de série de 1 à 450) comportent les caractéristiques suivantes :
• un pontet repose doigt,
• le levier de chargement à la droite de l'arme
• Système de clef pour le démontage sous la forme d’une petite pédale
• Un anneau de calotte flottant
• Un canon octogonal au départ puis rond.
• Le marquage LM en lettres anglaises entrelacées dans un ovale à côté du numéro de série sur le coté droit de l’arme

--








b) Entre les numéros de série 450 vers 1000 (environ), apparaissent les modèles dits « de transition », combinant les caractéristiques des 1ers modèles et celles du 2eme modèle.

c) A partir du numéro de série 1000 (environ), on voit apparaître des changements qui caractérisent les revolvers Le Mat « second modèle », à savoir :

• Suppression du pontet repose doigt pour laisser à la place un pontet rond
• Levier de chargement à gauche de l'arme
• Démontage du revolver par une grosse goupille sous le canon
• Anneau de calotte intégrée dans l’armature de la poignée
• Canon supérieur octogonal sur toute la longueur
• Marquage LM en lettres capitales surmonté d’une étoile à coté du numéro de série sur le coté droit de l’arme


- --

Il existera tout au long de l'évolution de ce revolver des variantes mineures concernant la forme du chien à 2 têtes et des variantes de marquages sur le canon associées à chaque évolution.



Ainsi un changement notable de marquage sur le canon est observé à partir des premiers revolvers autour du numéro 1800. Avant ce numéro le marquage est « Col Le Mat Bte sgdg Paris », le nouveau marquage devient alors « Syst Le Mat Bte sgdg Paris » en lettres gothiques ou capitales.








Curieusement on a pu observer certains revolvers portant ce marquage en lettres capitales avec une faute de frappe : SCDG au lieu de SGDG.

Le revolver Le Mat de fabrication parisienne portant le plus haut numéro observé est le 2494, on ignore si la production continua longtemps après ce numéro à Paris.

d) Les revolvers Le Mat produits en Grande Bretagne.

Une certaine zone de mystère entoure encore la production de ces armes outre-manche.

Dans le but de diversifier et d’augmenter les capacités de production de leur revolver les deux associés se tournèrent alors vers l’industrie armurière britannique.
La numérotation des Le Mat Anglais est confuse, certaines armes comportent des numéros de série faibles (un spécimen numéroté 5 est connu) puis la numérotation saute directement
autour du chiffre 100 puis dans la tranche des 1000, 3000, 5000, la grande majorité de ces revolvers étant numéroté entre 8000 et 9000.

D’après les recherches les plus récentes sur le sujet, il semble probable que les revolvers produits en Angleterre soient divisés en 2 catégories distinctes :

• Les armes produites par de petits armuriers indépendants (Aston & Francis, Robert Jones…)

• Celles incluses dans le cadre d’un contrat de 2000 armes clairement défini avec l’entreprise Tipping & Lawden (seuls 1000 exemplaires de ce contrat furent en réalité produits)


Les revolvers portant un numéro de série bas (inférieur à 8000) ont toutes les caractéristiques des revolvers produits à Paris dans les premières années.
De plus ces armes comportent des variantes au niveau du marquage du canon et une numérotation complètement chaotique suggérant la fabrication par des petits armuriers indépendants.
En réalité en observant de près ces revolvers on remarque des similitudes d’usinage avec les armes produites à Paris, indiquant très certainement que ces revolvers furent produits à Paris et expédiés pour finition (numérotation, marquage sur le canon …) chez différentes petites entreprises en Angleterre.



A l’inverse, les revolvers dont le numéro de série est compris entre 8000 et 9000 sont quasiment tous identiques au niveau finition comme au niveau mécanique, suggérant ainsi leur fabrication par une entreprise unique.
De plus ils comportent des différences d’usinage significatives avec les modèles tardifs produits à Paris, confirmant ainsi l’hypothèse d’une production entièrement anglaise.
Ces armes sont marquées sur le canon : « LEMAT & GIRARD’S PATENT LONDON » en lettres capitales.









La production effective de ces armes du contrat Tipping & Lawden débuta au début de l’année 1865, devant les difficultés financières croissantes du gouvernement de la Confédération, le Dr Girard ne fut payé que pour les 1000 premiers exemplaires et le reste de la commande fut annulé.

Il est peu probable qu’un seul de ces revolvers fut utilisé au combat par les armées du Sud, en effet le dernier document officiel témoignant d’une livraison effective de revolvers Le Mat par un bateau ayant réussi à forcer le blocus maritime du Nord date du milieu de l’année 1864.





e) Un autre critère de classification :

En réalité, si les différents modèles de revolvers Le Mat sont aujourd'hui désignés par les collectionneurs de la façon décrite ci dessus, il existe une différence importante dans le mécanisme de l'arme qui est transverse à la classification décrite.
En effet sur les premiers modèles de revolvers Parisien compris entre le numéro 1 et 2000 (environ), le verrouillage du barillet est assuré par un petit axe en métal qui, lorsque le chien est à l'armé, sort à coté de la barrette pour s'emboîter dans des petits trous (diam 1.5 mm) creusés dans la face arrière du barillet.
Ce mode de verrouillage ne convenait pas à l'utilisation pour de nombreuses raisons :
manqué de précision d'ajustage dans la fabrication, encrassage du à l'emploi de la poudre noire et de résidus divers qui bouchaient les trous dans le barillet, casse du petit ergot en métal....










Il faut souligner que les revolvers portant des marquages anglais avec des petits numéros de série comportent ce système de blocage du barillet.

Last edited by lionrobe77; June 9, 2013 at 02:50 PM.
lionrobe77 is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 01:23 PM   #97
lionrobe77
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Melun France
Posts: 24
Suite à ces problèmes, le mode de verrouillage fut changé (à partir environ du numéro de série 2000) au profit d'une came s'emboîtant à l’arrière du barillet dans de larges encoches, assurant ainsi un verrouillage de bien meilleure qualité !
Les revolvers fabriqués à Londres dans le cadre du contrat Tipping & Lawden (numéro de série 8000 à 9000) comportent tous ce nouveau système de verrouillage.









Cette différence fondamentale de mécanisme est visible au premier coup d’œil en observant le côté droit du revolver. En effet, la présence d’une petite vis à côté de la grosse vis de l’axe du chien indique d’emblée que le système de verrouillage est du premier type (cette petite vis est la vis de tension du ressort du petit axe s’emboîtant dans les trous à l’arrière du barillet)















f) La fabrication et la livraison des revolvers Le Mat

Le Docteur Le Mat et son associé le Dr Girard signèrent un contrat de 5000 revolvers pour les armées du sud, ce contrat ne sera jamais honoré totalement pour plusieurs raisons.
Tout d'abord, au niveau de la production, le revolver se révèle compliqué et long à produire.
De plus, le temps passant la confédération rechignait à payer les revolvers pour des problèmes de trésorerie.
Ainsi, les relations entre les Dr Girard responsable de la production à Paris et le major Caleb Huse, inspecteur des armées du sud responsable des achats d'armes en Europe, devinrent extrêmement tendues, Huse refusant de nombreux revolvers à l'inspection.
Un des reproches du Maj Huse portait sur le jeu que comportait le barillet à l’armé, imputable à un mode de verrouillage fragile. C'est suite à ces remarques, qu'il fut décidé de changer le système de verrouillage.
Cette modification ne désarma ni l’hostilité évidente du major Huse manifeste, ni sa mauvaise volonté certaine à accepter les revolvers Le Mat. Il fut même accusé par les 2 docteurs d'être corrompu et de privilégier l'achat du revolver anglais KERR produit par la London Armoury (de fait le revolver KERR avait clairement la préférence du MAJ HUSE).
Enfin, aux problèmes de production du revolver, s'ajoutait le problème de leur livraison car le temps passant, le blocus maritime des côtes de la confédération par la marine du nord s’avérait de plus en plus efficace, coulant de nombreux navires sudistes tentant de forcer le passage.

Ainsi, on estime que les derniers revolvers Le Mat fabriqués à Paris à avoir pu traverser l'atlantique et combattre aux mains de soldats confédérés ont des numéros de séries inférieurs à #1850 (environ).

Le total de production des revolvers Le Mat à percussion toutes productions confondues (France, Angleterre) est estimé à environ 3500 exemplaires dont à peu prés 1500 furent effectivement livrés aux armées de la Confédération.
Une écrasante majorité des revolvers utilisés par la CSA furent produits à Paris, quelques revolvers finis à Londres par des petits armuriers indépendants ont peut être pu forcer le blocus et rejoindre le Sud.[/quote]
lionrobe77 is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 05:53 PM   #98
Gaucho Gringo
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 10, 2006
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 773
Lionrobe77, no problem with the French text. I just went to Bing Translator and got the translated text. Interesting reading.
__________________
357 Taurus Gaucho, 22 Heritage RR, 3-1858 NMA Remingtons(2-44 1-36), 2-1851 Navies, 31 Baby Dragoon 4", 12 ga H&R, 16 Ga Western Field, 43 Spanish Remington Rolling Block, 44 ASM Colt Walker, NAA 22 black powder, HP C9 9mm, IJ top break 32 S&W short, H&R 1904 32 S&W, CZ-50 32acp
Gaucho Gringo is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:56 AM   #99
snidervolley
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 23, 2011
Posts: 31
Wow
Lionrobe thanks for the post
found out after digging into my lemat thayt the main spring retainer pawl is broken %$^#()!! not sure if im capable of going that deep into this
snidervolley is offline  
Old July 5, 2013, 02:22 PM   #100
elhombreconnonombre
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 3, 2013
Location: South of Austin in Hays Co., a day's ride from Bexar, Enchanted Rock, and Plum Creek
Posts: 638
Le Mat cylinder on gunbroker

I saw this on gunbroker. I don't think this is an Italian repro bp cyl. May be a fake, from a non firing repro, or perhaps could it be an original? What do yall think?

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...=351382872#PIC
__________________
On patrol and cold camping tonight with Cap'n Yack and Flacco on the Pinta Trail under a Comanche Moon near Enchanted Rock...out of cell phone range

God Bless John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Errol Flynn, Randolph Scott, and Val Forgett Jr.
elhombreconnonombre is offline  
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise.
This site, its contents, Shooting Reviews, and its contents are Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Firearms Forum, Inc.
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
Although The High Road has attempted to provide accurate information on the forum, The High Road assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information. All information is provided "as is" with all faults without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. Neither The High Road nor any of its directors, members, managers, employees, agents, vendors, or suppliers will be liable for any direct, indirect, general, bodily injury, compensatory, special, punitive, consequential, or incidental damages including, without limitation, lost profits or revenues, costs of replacement goods, loss or damage to data arising out of the use or inability to use this forum or any services associated with this forum, or damages from the use of or reliance on the information present on this forum, even if you have been advised of the possibility of such damages.