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Old July 11, 2014, 08:39 PM   #1
Gun Master
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Replica Requests: It Doesn't Hurt to Ask

I wish someone would do a modern update reproduction of the Remington New Model Pocket Revolver in .22 LR.

The original Ruger Bearcat and some of the NAA Revolvers were supposedly influenced by this idea, but some felt it was not enough.

It is hoped that the US will meet that challenge, and not let Italy, or others, out do us.
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Old July 11, 2014, 08:50 PM   #2
BobWright
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Well, I've sort of felt the same way, except that I'd prefer a centerfire, such as .32 Magnum or maybe even .38 S&W.

Incidentally, I have seen some Italian models of the 1849 Colt Pocket Model in .32 S&W, maybe these were cartridge conversions.

Bob Wright
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Old July 12, 2014, 08:48 AM   #3
mnrivrat
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Quote:
Incidentally, I have seen some Italian models of the 1849 Colt Pocket Model in .32 S&W, maybe these were cartridge conversions.
Yes ,they were conversions, and you can get the same for the little pocket Remington as well. In .32S&W (for steel frame replicas only)

I agee that one in .22 RF would be a nice little plinker. At this point one would have to sleeve the barrel and cylinder down to get what you want. Modify the hammer and put in a conresion ring. Not sure of the cost of that but it should be doable for a high price.
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Old July 12, 2014, 11:12 PM   #4
Jim K
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And what exactly would be the rationale today for a spur trigger single action? Such a gun would be dangerous, with no reason or excuse for the added danger.

Jim
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Old July 12, 2014, 11:51 PM   #5
timothy75
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Check out NAA Jim
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Old July 13, 2014, 04:47 PM   #6
BobWright
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Jim K said:
Quote:
And what exactly would be the rationale today for a spur trigger single action? Such a gun would be dangerous, with no reason or excuse for the added danger.
The lack of a trigger guard doesn't make a gun any more dangerous now than it did a hundred years ago. Its not the gun that's dangerous, but the folks behind them that are dangerous.

As to rationale for for having one? Wants is about as good an argument as any. Why have a Single Action revolver? Why have a fifteen shot auto loading pistol? Why have a plastic pistol?

And exactly what is the "added danger?" A spur trigger has to be thumb cocked, not so with the double action trigger.

Sorry, I don't see any more danger in a spur trigger revolver than I do in striker fired auto pistols.

Bob Wright
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Old July 13, 2014, 04:50 PM   #7
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And Mnrivrat:

To clarify my statement, what I was referring to was replicas of cartridge converted revolvers sold as cartridge conversions, not replacement parts to convert your alreay owned cap-and-ball revovlers. Sort of hard to put into words.

Bob Wright
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Old July 13, 2014, 07:09 PM   #8
Jim K
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Yes, I know that real safety is "between the ears" but there really is a difference between today's views and those of 150 years ago. By the standards of the 1860's, the original Ruger Blackhawks were perfectly safe, but someone managed to injure himself and Ruger had to redesign the gun or have the company put our of business.

Having a few spur trigger revolvers, and shot most of them, I have to say that I just don't trust them. With some it is nearly impossible to cock the gun without having the finger on or near the trigger. As collector pieces, I have no concerns. I fire them only on a range and very carefully, knowing the possible problems. But (and yes, I know about the NAA) I would not carry one.

The same, FWIW, goes for the Jo-Lo-Ar pistols, even though they were intended to be never loaded until they were to be fired.

Jim
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Old July 14, 2014, 06:58 PM   #9
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I would love to see S&W “Rerelease” the American and/or Russian in the original configuration but made with current materials for current ammunition. And I’m not interested the repo stuff coming out of Italy.
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Old July 15, 2014, 02:02 AM   #10
mnrivrat
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Quote:
And Mnrivrat:

To clarify my statement, what I was referring to was replicas of cartridge converted revolvers sold as cartridge conversions, not replacement parts to convert your alreay owned cap-and-ball revovlers. Sort of hard to put into words.

Bob Wright
I hear you Bob .

Fact is that Uberti does make just that in certain guns. They come as factory converted revolvers.
Also many other conversions involve just the cylinder, which can be swapped out in minutes without modifying the gun, and you can change them back to the non-cartridge version just as easy.

Most conversion cylinders are a bit over $200 and I have seen one made for the 1863 Pocket Remington to convert it to .32S&W (sometimes refered to as the .32 S&W Short) One for the Colt 1849 also is available.

Other possible marriages between old style guns and new cartridges/materials would be fun and a few exist. Nitch markets however are not something manufacturing goes into without a lot of thought. The sales have to be there.

Keith
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