Quantcast
first 22 advise - Page 2 - THR
THR  

Go Back   THR > Tools and Technologies > Rifle Country

Welcome to THR
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have, access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!


If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit the help section.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 14, 2014, 08:11 AM   #26
MedWheeler
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 14, 2008
Location: SouthEastern FL
Posts: 3,456
I just got a Henry the other day. Love its feel and action, but haven't shot it yet.

It does indeed have a safety, but it would require some skill on the part of a child to operate. To engage it from a hammer-cocked position, one must restrain the hammer while giving a quick and gentle press on the trigger, then quickly releasing the trigger and lowering the hammer. Done properly, the hammer will stop just shy of full-rest. This is the "safe" position. From the "rest" position, the safety is engaged by pulling the hammer back to the first click, which is less than 1/4 inch.

I like the 10/22 idea for this situation, as it is easily made a single-shot by removing the magazine, and because it can "grow" with the boy's tastes and likes for decades to come.

With supervision, though, the Henry would be an excellent choice as well. Plenty of teeth have been cut on a good lever-action rimfire.
__________________
"Zero Tolerance" may sound cool, but COMMON SENSE should rule in school!
MedWheeler is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 08:18 AM   #27
MedWheeler
Member
 
 
Join Date: June 14, 2008
Location: SouthEastern FL
Posts: 3,456
WestKentucky writes:

Quote:
Absolutley NOT the Henry. The Henry has no safety so a cocked hammer means a hot gun. Small hands with little experience would be a recipe for disaster. I once managed to shoot between my toes with one and it stayed in the woods for the day until my father went and retrieved it. It was sold immediately following...and I was about 18 or 20 with plenty experience
I read your account of this incident in another thread. You got raked over the coals by respondents over your muzzle direction in that thread.

The Henry does have a safety, but (as I mention above) I agree that it would be tricky for young hands (those of an experienced 18-20 year old are another story.)
__________________
"Zero Tolerance" may sound cool, but COMMON SENSE should rule in school!

Last edited by MedWheeler; July 14, 2014 at 08:24 AM.
MedWheeler is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 08:41 AM   #28
jrdolall
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: February 3, 2012
Location: Alabama
Posts: 1,637
My personal choice for my kids, less than 10 YO at the time, was to "give" them a bolt action .22. Of course I already had the guns so I gave them to each kid and then 3 years later gave them to the next kid. By the time they were 10 they had moved to a 10/22. We tried a little pink Cricket and my daughter shot it about 10 times.

I personally really like getting kids started with a bolt. That's probably because it's how I started out but I think it helps them in the long run because they have to think about THIS shot, reload, and then think about the next shot.
__________________
"...if I was wrong don't you think I'd know it?"- Dr Sheldon Cooper
jrdolall is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 08:51 AM   #29
bannockburn
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 24, 2007
Posts: 7,046
See what your son likes (single shot, pump, lever action, semi-auto), and what fits him the best. The only other consideration my son had was that eventually he wanted to mount a scope on it.
__________________
"An elegant weapon for a more civilized age."-Obi Wan Kenobi
bannockburn is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 09:33 AM   #30
GarySTL
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 1, 2005
Location: Warrenton, MO
Posts: 418
Had my great nephews shooting two of my Henry's over the fourth of July. They ranged in age from 11 to 18 and none had issues with the safety once it was explained. But we adults ensured that strict muzzle decipline was observed at all times. The 7 year old only shot the RAR bolt gun.
GarySTL is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 07:03 PM   #31
maxxhavoc
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 8, 2008
Posts: 57
I have and enjoy 10/22's, but I don't think they are a go-to gun anymore unless you plan on customizing.

The Marlin 795 does what the stock 10/22 does, cheaper.

As far as recommendations for a starting shooter, Savage Mk II hands down. It is fun to shoot and very accurate. I bought one for my daughter and take it to the range almost every time-whether she goes or not.
maxxhavoc is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 07:16 PM   #32
I6turbo
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 3, 2012
Posts: 283
As the owner of about 15 rimfires including the CZ 452 Scout, and the parent of 6- and a 9-year olds who shoot, I recommend a CZ 452 Trainer for you guys. A normal 10-year old is big enough to shoot the Trainer. While the Scout would temporarily be a better choice for him fit wise, the Trainer is much quieter, has MUCH better iron sights, offers a longer sighting radius, AND you will love shooting it as well. The Scout is very nice, and I also can recommend it so long as you don't mind your son kind of "outgrowing" it pretty soon and are open to buying a "full size" CZ when he realizes that they exist. Don't get me wrong, the Scout is a lot of fun even for an adult, but the Trainer is an outstanding gun. Of all the rimfires I have, it's my favorite, all things considered.

Scout


Trainer


Scout in Ultra Lux stock


Also, be warned, your first CZ is likely NOT to be your last.
__________________
"A democracy won't stand for long because eventually the masses figure out that they can elect to be supported by the republic." -attributed to Aristotle (and other observers through the centuries)
I6turbo is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 07:17 PM   #33
Reloadron
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: July 6, 2012
Location: Cleveland, Ohio USA
Posts: 2,960
The Ruger 10/22 and Marlin Model 60 are always popular answers in threads like this and I like both. However, my suggestion in these threads always remains the same. I suggest a good used bolt gun like the Remington 510, 511, 512 or other similar rifles. There are also excellent new bolt guns like some of the CZ rifles as mentioned. Depends on what you want to spend.

I favor the bolt guns simply because I feel they are a better rifle to develop good marksmanship skills with. I am not saying the same can't be done with a Ruger 10/22 or Marlin 60 or any similar rifle, just saying a good old bolt action gun is the better choice in my opinion.

After looking at some of the CZ rifles I feel a need to have one.

Just My Take
Ron

Last edited by Reloadron; July 14, 2014 at 07:26 PM.
Reloadron is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 07:43 PM   #34
d2wing
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 10, 2008
Posts: 1,800
I bought a Remington 514 youth single shot for my grandson and he is very happy with it. It is the same as a Marlin bolt action. I considered the Cricket and the Henry but the Marlin/Remington was much better quality action with a usable safety. I think Savage makes a youth model,as well. Do not start them on a gun they will grow into as this will foster poor posture and handling habits that will be difficult to correct later. A lot of bad shots were started wrong as kids.
By the time they get to gun classes at age 12 they are often unwilling or unable to unlearn what dad taught them. And often a instructor is unable to spend time needed to correct them.
d2wing is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 07:46 PM   #35
R H Clark
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 11, 2011
Location: Alabama
Posts: 307
Just using iron sights the CZ Trainer might be a good choice depending on how well he can reach the trigger but I think the Trainers stock would be too long for him to get proper eye relief with a scope. I do love the tangent sights of the Trainer and highly recommend getting one before they are gone. I do not think the 452 Scout has been replaced by the 455 yet.

Best just get both. The Scout only costs about $300 which is just a couple tanks of gas difference in price between it and some of the lesser guns mentioned in this thread. The CZ will hold it's value and might even gain some in 10 years where the Marlin 60 will not, even though it is a decent plinking gun. The CZ is better in every aspect, accuracy, trigger "after tweeking" and resale.
R H Clark is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 09:12 PM   #36
Stephen1956
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 13, 2014
Posts: 17
I've had 3, 10/22's and have sold them all I have a Remington 597 with a bull barrel and have free floated the barrel. I have yet to find a 10/22 that can out shoot it, as for S&W 15-22 I'd say no because where are you going to find the .22 ammo for it my friend has one hanging in a gun rack because of the .22 shortage. The Marlin is a good choice first rifle I ever bought for son. And it's 17 years old and still shoots like it was new.
Stephen1956 is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 09:57 PM   #37
danez71
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 17, 2009
Posts: 1,681
Quote:
Originally Posted by JO JO View Post
well I always come here for solid advise so here it goes,
time to buy my 10 yr old his first .22 he as been shooting air soft rifle in
back yard with me for close to a year with safety rules applied, so I now
want to let him step up a bit and take him to shoot rimfire.
So here is the question thinking of getting him his own .22 rifle to be kept
in safe of course thinking of a 1. marlin 60 2. henery lever 3. single shot cricket
4. ???
any advise would help
thanks all
Keeping the OP in mind.......

Of those three, Id get the Marlin 60 with-out thinking twice.


Opening it up a bit, Id seriously consider the 10/22 because he wont out grow it as easily as the 60 and the customization factor.

For a bolt, a Ruger American 22 unless you want to spend more or look a lot harder.
__________________
.

Ask yourself, Is the goal to get more states to support the 2A or to voluntarily handover to the Anti's one state at a time?

The US was founded because people ran away and left,... However, the Constitution came to be because we STOPPED RUNNING AND FOUGHT for our Rights.
danez71 is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 10:18 PM   #38
Field Tester
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 10, 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by OARNGESI View Post
How about a savage mkii? They have great accuracy are fairly cheap and he can easily grow in to it.
I'll 2nd this if you're looking for a bolt action. 5 round mag, very accurate and light weight. I love shooting my fiancees.
Big plus is the different colored fiber optic sights to help youngsters learn to control their accuracy.
Field Tester is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 10:24 PM   #39
I6turbo
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 3, 2012
Posts: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by R H Clark View Post
Just using iron sights the CZ Trainer might be a good choice depending on how well he can reach the trigger but I think the Trainers stock would be too long for him to get proper eye relief with a scope.
The stock length might possibly be an issue for eye relief depending upon the 10-year old, the scope, and the setup, but my average-size 9-year-old shoots this one with no issues from a bench or a standing rest. We recently had the Scout and this Lux (same exact dimensions as a Trainer) out for a week of shooting, both scoped, and he chose to fire the Scout 30 times at most, but several hundred rounds out of this one. Trigger reach is definitely not an issue.


Quote:
Best just get both. The Scout only costs about $300 which is just a couple tanks of gas difference in price between it and some of the lesser guns mentioned in this thread. The CZ will hold it's value and might even gain some in 10 years where the Marlin 60 will not, even though it is a decent plinking gun. The CZ is better in every aspect, accuracy, trigger "after tweeking" and resale.
Best advice yet!
__________________
"A democracy won't stand for long because eventually the masses figure out that they can elect to be supported by the republic." -attributed to Aristotle (and other observers through the centuries)
I6turbo is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 10:27 PM   #40
Field Tester
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 10, 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 481
Everyone suggesting to load a 10/22 without the magazine, please stop.
Ruger states in the manual (if any of those suggesting bothered to read) that this is horrible for the firearm.

Also, those suggesting a Ruger American, keep in mind that there are no "iron sights" on the firearm. It's only set up to accept a scope.

Last edited by Field Tester; July 14, 2014 at 10:33 PM.
Field Tester is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 10:54 PM   #41
Ed Ames
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 21, 2006
Location: Tejas Norte
Posts: 2,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Field Tester View Post
Also, those suggesting a Ruger American, keep in mind that there are no "iron sights" on the firearm. It's only set up to accept a scope.
Are you saying they are plastic sights or what? It may accept a scope, but "only" is incorrect.

__________________
Don't hide arms, get sidearms!
Ed Ames is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 11:28 PM   #42
Field Tester
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 10, 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Ames View Post
Are you saying they are plastic sights or what? It may accept a scope, but "only" is incorrect.

My apologies, I was misinformed. I have a friend that just bought one and he said his didn't have any. I'll have to call him.

I also bought one in .30-06 and I know for a fact that didn't have sights.
Thanks for the correction!
Field Tester is offline  
Old July 14, 2014, 11:46 PM   #43
R H Clark
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 11, 2011
Location: Alabama
Posts: 307
Get whatever you want but I tell you the CZ 452 " I own 2" will shoot with my $1000 Anschutz and is about 90% as nice in fit and finish. It's not a plastic piece of CNC garbage.
R H Clark is offline  
Old July 15, 2014, 12:08 AM   #44
Manny
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 23, 2003
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 576
The Ruger American Rimfire carbine comes with the short shock with low comb for the nice fiber optic sights and a higher comb for a scope if so desired. It also has a very nice trigger and can grow with him be installing the longer length of pull stock sections. The 10/22 50th anniversary model has an American style stock that allows for fitting the rifle to the youngster properly even as they grow.

Either one would make a great start to get a young shooter involved in our beloved sport...
Manny is offline  
Old July 15, 2014, 12:17 AM   #45
BigBL87
Member
 
 
Join Date: January 16, 2014
Location: Tonica, IL
Posts: 106
I love my Savage Mark II. Easy to clean, more accurate than me, and cheap.
BigBL87 is offline  
Old July 15, 2014, 12:32 AM   #46
Ed Ames
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 21, 2006
Location: Tejas Norte
Posts: 2,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manny View Post
The 10/22 50th anniversary model
I had never seen that model until this evening. I may break down and finally buy a 10/22. Apart from old Mausers and other historical oddities, my iron sighted rifles all have peep sights.
__________________
Don't hide arms, get sidearms!
Ed Ames is offline  
Old July 15, 2014, 01:51 AM   #47
arspeukinen
Member
 
 
Join Date: October 4, 2011
Location: Finland
Posts: 86
S&W 15-22. Light, versatile, works. Just add the price of a good trigger.
arspeukinen is offline  
Old July 16, 2014, 09:38 AM   #48
DM~
Member
 
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: upper mid west
Posts: 1,800
I own many of the 22's mentioned here, and more...

If I line them up, the kids go for my Henry's!!

I'd buy him a Henry lever and teach him how to properly use a hammer gun. He has to learn sometime, and learning while he's young is a good thing!

The new shooters here, took to it very quickly!

DM
DM~ is offline  
Old July 16, 2014, 09:41 PM   #49
Joe the Redneck
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 10, 2006
Posts: 249
I would get a Ruger 10/22. He'll have it forever. You can load one round at a time in the mag if that is an issue.

I think it offers a good combination of low price, durability, accuracy, and after market stocks.

I avoided the 10/22 for years because I thought it was "too popular" to be anything good. Then I bought one. No regrets.
Joe the Redneck is offline  
Old July 16, 2014, 10:09 PM   #50
twofifty
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 21, 2007
Posts: 1,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by JO JO View Post
well I always come here for solid advise so here it goes,
time to buy my 10 yr old his first .22 he as been shooting air soft rifle in
back yard with me for close to a year with safety rules applied, so I now
want to let him step up a bit and take him to shoot rimfire.
So here is the question thinking of getting him his own .22 rifle to be kept
in safe of course thinking of a 1. marlin 60 2. henery lever 3. single shot cricket
4. ???
any advise would help
thanks all
One step up from airsoft would be to a pellet rifle.

But at 10 years of age it is a bit too late for that now, esp. considering he's demonstrated safe airsoft handling. So I'd take two steps up and go for the 22.

If your goals are to teach marksmanship and firearms knowledge, a repeater first used as a single shot as others have suggested is the way to go. It will be interesting to see how the see-saw between learning marksmanship and entertainment blasting plays out.

Will you be shooting at a home range, at a club or commercial range, or on public lands? Let us know how your son does.
twofifty is online now  
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise.
This site, its contents, Shooting Reviews, and its contents are Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Firearms Forum, Inc.
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
Although The High Road has attempted to provide accurate information on the forum, The High Road assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information. All information is provided "as is" with all faults without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. Neither The High Road nor any of its directors, members, managers, employees, agents, vendors, or suppliers will be liable for any direct, indirect, general, bodily injury, compensatory, special, punitive, consequential, or incidental damages including, without limitation, lost profits or revenues, costs of replacement goods, loss or damage to data arising out of the use or inability to use this forum or any services associated with this forum, or damages from the use of or reliance on the information present on this forum, even if you have been advised of the possibility of such damages.