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Old October 20, 2005, 12:29 AM   #1
patentmike
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Remington model 58

I ran across a model 58 and don't know much about them. It sure looks a lot like the 1100, although I didn't have one right there to compare it to. Is the 58 a good gun?
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Old October 20, 2005, 10:33 AM   #2
Jagermeister
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Talking

I have one in mint condition. Also has the engraving inlaid with 12 carrot gold. Yes! It is a very good shotgun. My dad left me mine, and he bought it new. Mine has a poly choke and is great for turkey shoots, and birds.

JM
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Old October 20, 2005, 12:58 PM   #3
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The Model 58, Remington's first gas-operated shotgun, was made from 1956 to 1964, when it was replaced by the 1100. In many ways, I prefer the 58 to the 1100 but absolute reliability, especially when mixing loads, is not one of them.
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Old October 21, 2005, 01:39 AM   #4
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I'm sure they had their reasons for designing the 1100, but they might have had to do with manufacturing costs rather than function. I'm thinking for $200I might take a chance on the 58. It looks like a lot of parts are identical to the 1100.
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Old October 21, 2005, 07:05 PM   #5
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I love the old "dial a duck" Sportsman 58. Mostly because mine was from my father. It WILL jam if you don't dial the gas porting correctly for the load.

$200 seems a good price. I've seen many between $180 - $250, but usually pretty beat up.
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Old October 21, 2005, 07:44 PM   #6
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I Started Shooting Trap...

With my mom's old '58 20 Gauge. Lots of fond memories and lots of empty 20 gauge hulls there.

They are good guns, if a little quirky. I've never had a problem with mom's, except when I decided to tear it all the way down to give it a real cleaning.

I ended up needing the help of my 90 year old grandfather (who happens to be the smartest and most mechanically inclined person to have ever walked this green earth ) to get it back together. I've never had such trouble with a gun... and I've fooled with a bunch of 'em.

Oh, if you want more than three shots, you are out of luck. The mag tube is blocked by the gas system and can't be extended or unplugged like the later 1100.

For the asking price, I'd get it if I had the money.
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Old October 23, 2005, 10:03 AM   #7
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Come to think of it, the one I looked at has a dial. I assume you set it according to what sort of load you are using?
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Old October 23, 2005, 11:59 AM   #8
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I've been told that Remington replaced the Model 58 because it just wouldn't hold up to a lot of shooting. Fine for hunters, but target shooters (trap, mostly) found them breaking down after a season or two. The 1100 was Remington's first gas shotgun that would handle a lifetime of target shooting.
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Old August 26, 2007, 09:06 PM   #9
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Help

My dad gave me a model 58 for my birthday last year. Its a 16 gauge the works perfect. Except for one thing, i have no idea how to use the "dial a duck." Please if anyone has any knowledge on this please give me details. Thanks
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Old August 26, 2007, 09:08 PM   #10
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Help

My dad gave me a model 58 for my birthday last year. Its a 16 gauge the works perfect. Except for one thing, i have no idea how to use the "dial a duck." Please if anyone has any knowledge on this please give me details. You can reach me at burkes10us@hotmail.com and i would appreciate any and all instructions.
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Old August 27, 2007, 10:52 AM   #11
ReadyontheRight
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I've learned more about old shotguns since posting this 2 years ago.

When people say "Dial a Duck", they refer to a choke system at the end of the barrel. I think it was almost always an aftermarket item.

The Remington "Dial-a-Matic" is the venting system on the magazine cap of your Remington model 58.

Here are the instructions from the owner's manual.

Quote:
Light and Heavy Load Selection

The magazine cap is vented to reduce the recoil and ensure proper operation of your shorgun when firing light or heavy loads including the MAGNUM loads. Rotate the "Dial-a-Matic" selector ("L" - Light, "H" - Heavy) clockwise towards the barrel to match any of the three raised marks on the magazine cap. This will vent the piston mechanism sufficiently for the load used.

FOr the "Sporttsman"-58 STANDARD model (2 3/4 in. chamber), match the "H" letter on the selector to the raised mark on the cap when shooting heavy or standard length MAGNUM loads. Match the "L" letter to the raised mark for light loads. For rifled slugs or 00 buckshot, match the "L" letter to the raised mark on the cap.

For the "Sportsman"-58 12 gauge MAGNUM model (3 in. chamber), match the "H" letter to the raised mark when shooting 3 inch Magnum shells. When shooting 2 3/4 inch standard length Magnum shells in this model match the "L" letter to the raised mark on the cap.
Here is the place to get old owner's manuals from Remington:

http://www.remington.com/library/dow...rs_manuals.asp
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Old August 27, 2007, 11:01 AM   #12
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The Sportsman 58 is a neat gun.

One change with the 1100 was the slit in the receiver extending back from the bolt handle slot. That was added because the 58 could crack at that spot, and the slit adds enough "give" to the receiver to alleviate the problem.

That doesn't mean the 58 will crack with normal shooting and normal loads. I'd just suggest you don't overdo it. Too many heavy loads can, of course, blast anything apart, like my old BT-99 trap single, or even an 870 (that does take a lot, but it can happen).

The 58's I've seen have been really attractive guns, and they shoot well.
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Old August 27, 2007, 11:25 AM   #13
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58 are good guns

Quote:
SwampWolf

The Model 58, Remington's first gas-operated shotgun, was made from 1956 to 1964, when it was replaced by the 1100. In many ways, I prefer the 58 to the 1100 but absolute reliability, especially when mixing loads, is not one of them.
Wasn't it the 878? it was sold for such a short time I have only seen one or two, REM's first gas operated shotgun!

The 58 used the same gas system as the 878, with addition of the gas regulating cap. But went to action parts more similair to the later 1100's.

The 1100 did away with the gas system in the mag tube, thus allowing all of the magazine capacity to possibly be usefull, with a much improved action.

the 11-87 using the same action, tries to make the gass system more versitle so a wider seliction of loads my be used.

To me the only draw back to the 58 is the need to understand what is a light or heavy load! shooting heavy loads on the light load gas setting puts loads of strain on action parts.

As with my Browning A5 if there is any doubt about what the shells being shot are, set it for the heavy loads, if it is a mixed bag of light and heavy definitly leave it on the heavy setting. A one shot auto is much better then a jammed or broken shotgun!


.
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Old August 28, 2007, 02:56 PM   #14
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Big Az Al,

The 58 was indeed replaced by the 878 and inturn the 878 was replaced by the 1100. My dad had an 878 he got from an uncle of mine who blew off the barrel. Dad got the barrel trimmed to 19 inches and bought a 28" modified choke barrel that he used all the time. He never used the 19" barrel.

It had a 3 shot capacity from the factory and no adjustment was needed for high or low brass shells. I can't tell you the number of pheasants, ducks and doves that gun took. It worked 100% all the time.

Not a common gun at all. I sold it with most of dad's other guns after he died and gave the money to my mother as he wished.

I miss that gun and treasure the memories.
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Old September 8, 2007, 02:46 PM   #15
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You might note that you can drill 870 Remington Pump barrels with gas ports and use on 58 Sportsman. It makes this shotgun more verisatule
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Old December 18, 2008, 08:22 AM   #16
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Remington 58 From A Yard Sale!!!!!!

Hello All,
Let's get this thread started again!! Several years ago we were stopped at a yard sale and I noticed a fellow at the back of the house with a shotgun on his tailgate! I asked the lady what was going on and she said "that's my husband and he is having a guy yardsale". I went back and there sitting on the taigate was a .16 gauge Remington 58 and several barrels. Long story short I walked away with the shotgun and 4 barrels. The barrels consisted of a 26" IC barrel, a 26" skeet with vent rib, and two 28" full choke barrels.

I just had one of the full choke barrels shortened, crowned, fitted with the old style Remington sights, and blued, that the smith did a wonderful job on!!! I have owned a Remington Mod 48 since the 60's and love it but actually prefer this 58 over my old standby! The improved cylinder barrel is excellent on Quail and the 58 stock just fits me perfectly!! So for those of you who say your not stopping at yard sales, you had better start..........I am hooked..............BTW the gun and 4 barrels cost me $225.........Take care and God bless. cordell
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Old December 18, 2008, 08:50 AM   #17
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The 58 is a fine gun. I was all set to buy one when Big Green introduced the 1100. I got one of those and never looked back. If you look, it is not hard to see that all of Remington's repeater shotguns since have evolved in one way or another from the 870. The biggest 'refinement' step before the new bottom ejector model was the 1100. That was where they went to the extended barrel tang, which basically ended any kinds of receiver issues with the semi autos in 12 gauge, and the outside the magazine tube gas system which increased the capacity for the 1100, and showed the way for all the other gas semis that followed.
A very good friend and his Dad took me hunting a lot in the early '60s, and they both had 58s, and I got to shoot them a lot, and loved the feel of them. I don't ever remember any problems.
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Old December 18, 2008, 12:14 PM   #18
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Virginian,
I have owned several 1100's through the years and all of them were excellent. As a matter of fact I still have an old steel frame 1100 in .20 gauge with an extra slug barrel that has turned into a safe Queen over the years. But getting back to the Mod 58, I think the fact that this shotgun fits me perfectly, and I hit what I shoot at, has a lot to do with me liking it so much. Years ago (late 60's) I had an old Winchester Mod 24 that was heavy and sort of a plain Jane shotgun. However it was one of those guns that fit me perfectly and some of the shots I made with that double were impressive to say the least. Here's the rub, all my friends had Parkers, L.C. Smiths, Sterlingworths etc and I wanted to move up a bit!! Well I traded a fellow the 24 and some cash for a L.C. Smith Ideal grade and have been sorry ever since. I couldn't hit a barn with it if I was inside it!!!!! I tried other Mod 24's over the years but they just weren't the same!!!!! So now that I have found this little fellow I think I will stick with it, and pass it on along with the rest of the clutter in my safe to my Grandson....... With all this said I will agree with you, that for the money the 1100 is probably the best semi auto on the market and for that matter the old 870 fits that description as well. Take care and God bless you and yours over this upcoming CHRISTmas. cordell
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Old December 18, 2008, 01:34 PM   #19
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cordell,
In 60 years, I have sold 2 guns I really regretted selling. One was a handgun, and the other was a 1974 870 Wingmaster Magnum that I could shoot better than any shotgun before or since. After several tries, I now have a 1976 vintage model that feels the same. I plan to keep this one. Very close in feel is my original 1963 1100. I had enuf sense to keep that one - just got 4 more.
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Old December 18, 2008, 06:16 PM   #20
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Hello Virginian,
I think we have all let some treasures go that we wish we still had!!! The funny part is both of us mentioned something we could truly shoot well and not the ones that if we had kept would have been worth the most money!!!! My how priorities change over the years ;-)...;-)... You mentioned the fact that you just picked up 4 more........... are they 1100's????.

I just picked up a Kimber Ultra Carry II that I have fallen into a bad case of "LIKE++++" with. Again with this rascal I can actually hit something and it fits my hand perfectly. I ordered a set of Elephant ivory grips for it, and next on the agenda will be locating a scrimshander to scratch a few lines on them. .............................Just another investment in my Grandsons collection ;-). BTW are you from Virginia originally or is Virginian just your handle??????? Take care and God bless you and yours. cordell
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Old December 18, 2008, 07:50 PM   #21
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Yes, I bought 4 more 1100s, a 12 Magnum (after shooting the '63 with a 3" barrel for 20 years), an LT20, a 28, and an LT20 youth for my stepson.
I am from Virginia, and I will always miss it. I am afraid the only way I will ever get back there for good is in a box.
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Old December 19, 2008, 12:41 PM   #22
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Hello Virginian,
We are located in Chatham, which is in south central Virginia almost at the N.C. border. I am glad to see that someone is buying up some of the semi auto shotguns. There really is a chance they may have severe restrictions on them in the near future. People is this area have been buying up AR 15 type rifles in fear of the fact they may be pulled off the market, I certainly hope not...BUT???????

I may try to pick up an 1100 LW 20ga myself. I had one years ago and it was heck on the squirrel population here on the farm, but had a full choke barrel and was a little tight for birds. I think if I look hard enough I will be able to find one of the older models with an IC and pick it up. Well we are off to the vets with 3 dogs in a horse trailer for their shots so I had better close for now. Take care and God bless. cordell
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Old January 2, 2009, 09:05 PM   #23
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Virginian, You may get a kick out of this. I was born in Virginia, but spent much of my childhood moving around. At the age my father gave me my first shotgun (rem 870) I was living in Oxford OH. The first shots I took with that shotgun were in a corn field just north of town. I moved around a lot more after that and ended up settling back down here in Virginia Beach. The funny thing is, I spent years wanting to get back to Oxford before I truly realized that Virginia is my home. Being as small as it is, I didn't expect to see anybody from Oxford online, especially someone with a screen name like yours.

Anyway, back on topic, I just bought a 58 sportsman and it's the first I've handled. I haven't shot it yet, but it has a nice feel and the craftsmanship is awesome, but then I would expect no less from Remington. I'm shopping for a good price on an 1100 but they seem to fetch a pretty high price, so I may not find one before the next big ban. We'll see.
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Old January 3, 2009, 12:07 AM   #24
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I used to go quail hunting in Princess Anne County (before the present day Virginia Beach was ever dreamed of) back in the early '60s, and spent a lot of time at Sandbridge. I grew up halfway between Williamsburg and Jamestown back when that was out in the country. Literally shot ducks waiting for the school bus (if I was lucky). Killed my first limit of doves in King and Queen County in 1964, with my new the fall before Model 1100. The man and his son who took me both had Model 58s. I liked the feel of those 58s, and would have bought one if the 1100 hadn't come out. Very similar feeling I think.
I went thru several shotguns before that 1100 made the term wingshooting more than a dream to me. There was a Winchester skeet and trap range just outside town where I killed a many a clay pigeon learning to be better. They were always trying to talk me into trying a Winchester shotgun, but when I finally did, I went about half a round before I went and got my 1100 back.
After college, I went to work at Chesapeake in West Point, Va., and moved around a lot since with mostly Pulp and Paper.
I live outside Oxford... don't want too much of that Miami U. liberal crowd to rub off. Reminds me a lot of William and Mary. It really isn't a bad area, but it's a far cry from home.
Have a happy and prosperous 2009 y'all.
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Old January 8, 2009, 09:05 AM   #25
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Just picked up a sportsman 58 over the weekend. The thing is very clean and fires like a dream. It came with a factory full choke barrel, 30". Does anyone know if it's okay to shoot steel loads through it? I know an 870 barrel can have vents drilled into it and work with the 58 but I'd rather not spend the money now. Thanks!
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