Quantcast
Looking at o/u, an autoloader was suggested for skeet - THR
THR  

Go Back   THR > Tools and Technologies > Shotguns

Welcome to THR
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have, access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!


If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit the help section.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 14, 2016, 10:16 PM   #1
sbwaters
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: January 27, 2016
Posts: 56
Looking at o/u, an autoloader was suggested for skeet

I have been closing in on a Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon I Sporting 12 ga 30" as a replacement for my Remington 1100 for beginning casual skeet and maybe sporting clays later.

A vendor put a Benelli 30" black composite auto in my hand, didnít catch the model, and it handled as balanced and agilely as the Beretta. He said the recoil would seem lighter, too.

I gather loads canít be too light to cycle.

Why should I consider one or the other?

Thanks!
sbwaters is offline  
Old June 14, 2016, 10:42 PM   #2
John3921
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 2, 2012
Location: Montana
Posts: 476
I prefer O/U, but either would do. 30" is a bit long for an autoloader though I think. My 28" A400 dwarfs my 30" O/U (the A400 is a 3-1/2" action, so there is that) I shoot some competition skeet - so my o/u is tubed for sub-gauge.

Recoil will be less noticeable with an autoloader. On the other hand , recoil for 1 oz 12 ga loads isn't all that big a deal unless you are particularly sensitive to recoil.

The O/U makes it a bit easier to manage your empties. If you reload this is a good thing. If you don't reload someone has to wander around the field and pick up your empties. I also find the movement and noise of the autoloader a little distracting, but not uncomfortably so.

There is some advantage for using different chokes in the O/U. I shoot skeet/skeet in mine so different chokes is not important to me for skeet. I do occasionally shoot a round of sporting clays - then it is nice to have different chokes for different presentations.
__________________
NRA Life member
John3921 is offline  
Old June 14, 2016, 11:37 PM   #3
GarySTL
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 1, 2005
Location: Warrenton, MO
Posts: 800
I shoot a Citori 625 with 30" barrels for skeet and sporting clays. I like the ability to have two chokes for clays. For skeet of course they are the same.
GarySTL is online now  
Old June 15, 2016, 12:07 AM   #4
cfullgraf
Member
 
 
Join Date: October 19, 2010
Location: East TN
Posts: 6,463
When I was shooting competitive skeet in the 1990s, many top shooters would shoot an auto loader in the 12 gauge event and a tubed O/U in the sub gauges. Others would use an O/U for all events.

I've not kept up with the sport so I do not know what shooters are doing these days.

At least for the sub gauges, a tubed O/U swings the same for all three gauges. Not important if you do not plan to shoot any of the sub gauges.

I shot a tubed O/U when I was competing.

I'd suggest doing some research and see what the top sporting clay shooters are shooting and lean in that direction.
__________________
Chuck
Real trucks don't have Otto cycles.
My mustang is green fueled, four on the floor and all terrain.
cfullgraf is offline  
Old June 15, 2016, 04:13 AM   #5
Virginian
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 7, 2003
Location: Williamsburg, Virginia
Posts: 3,879
A gas semi auto can attenuate recoil. An inertia autoloader will not, unless you get one with one of those two piece stocks.
__________________
What could have happened... did.

I would not trust Remington's dating service accuracy as far as I could throw my truck.
Virginian is offline  
Old June 15, 2016, 10:04 PM   #6
d2wing
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 10, 2008
Posts: 2,755
My preferred is a Beretta 686 Onyx O/U. I like the balance, point and faster handling of a good over under. Some prefer the weight and momentum of a longer semiauto. Also the softer recoil. But then I like shooting Sporting Clays over trap or skeet.
Bennelli makes a very good shotgun and I shoot well with them myself. Which one do you like the feel of best or fits you best. I would start with the Beretta and buy the Bennelli later, or vice versa. Both are good choices although some would prefer a heavier gas semiauto.
d2wing is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 12:09 AM   #7
JudgeHolden10
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 5, 2013
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 373
When I first started shooting, I was set on a Benelli SuperSport. While saving for that, I spent some serious time shooting O/Us. I bought an O/U and greatly prefer it due to the way it swings and points. (Aesthetically, the wood-and-blued-steel trumps anything, but that has nothing to do with performance.) This is, of course, a personal preference. The one undeniable difference is what John3921 mentioned:

Quote:
Originally Posted by John3921 View Post
I do occasionally shoot a round of sporting clays - then it is nice to have different chokes for different presentations.
I like to shoot sporting clays more than trap or skeet, and I like having a light mod over an improved cylinder or sometimes a mod over an improved cylinder, depending on the pair. While that's a nice feature, I don't think it ought to be the decisive factor.

You may want to shoot an O/U if you have the opportunity. You may find that it is perfect for you, or you may choose the autoloader. Good luck.
JudgeHolden10 is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 08:15 AM   #8
jaguarxk120
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 30, 2011
Posts: 749
Go with the Beretta 686, great gun.
jaguarxk120 is online now  
Old June 16, 2016, 08:34 AM   #9
maxxhavoc
Member
 
 
Join Date: September 8, 2008
Location: SC Lowcountry
Posts: 579
When I shot skeet years ago, the range I was at would not allow any shotgun that ejected empties.

Policing empties on a hot range was a safety issue, and the range was too busy to shut it down so people could pick up hulls. So I had to set my shotgun aside and grab a range loaner.

I don't know if other ranges do this, or even if that range still does.
maxxhavoc is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 11:05 AM   #10
John3921
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 2, 2012
Location: Montana
Posts: 476
I've seen ranges that prohibit picking up empties. Basically when they hit the ground they belong to the range. I don't know if that was because of safety issues, or an attempt to keep ranges moving. Shoot your round and get off the field so someone else can shoot.

We tell pullers and shooters not to go past the baseline. Basically you'll loose your station 7 and high 8 hulls since they will get thrown outside the baseline. This is a safety concern, once you step out past the baseline on a skeet field you are in the line of fire for an adjacent field. Also, stepping in front of the window on low 7 is a bad idea - someone throws a target and you could get seriously hurt.

I've never seen a range ban autoloaders though. I know a lot of trapshooters get grumpy about autoloaders slinging hulls at them on the trap line.
__________________
NRA Life member
John3921 is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 12:42 PM   #11
Sheepdog1968
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 20, 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 3,339
It really sounds like a personal preference thing. Try both and see if one speaks to you more. If you don't like to clean your shotguns that much, you can go longer between cleanings with the over under. Not sure if that matters to you or not.
__________________
RIP Loui Awerbuck. I will truly miss your insight, openness, humility, and training. The world is diminished by your passing.
Sheepdog1968 is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 07:55 PM   #12
bannockburn
Member
 
 
Join Date: April 24, 2007
Posts: 11,462
sbwaters

Many years ago my first O/U shotgun was a Beretta Model 680. I tried a lot of other shotguns and settled on the Beretta because for me it had the best balance and handling of any other shotgun out there. I also have had a Franchi Renaissance that felt very much the same way as the Beretta.
__________________
"An elegant weapon for a more civilized age."-Obi Wan Kenobi
bannockburn is offline  
Old June 16, 2016, 09:36 PM   #13
Acera
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 26, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,085
The Olympics are coming on in a few weeks, check out what those folks use.

In 2012 every medalist used an O/U. That ought to tell you something about what the best in the world think of autoloaders for skeet.

If the recoil bothers you, get it ported and a recoil reducer put in the stock. My Beretta 682 Gold is a very mild shooting gun.
__________________
Thomas Jefferson:"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government"
Acera is offline  
Old June 17, 2016, 10:21 AM   #14
sbwaters
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: January 27, 2016
Posts: 56
You people are fun. Thanks for the advice!
sbwaters is offline  
Old June 17, 2016, 11:10 AM   #15
jmr40
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 26, 2007
Posts: 9,291
Quote:
The Olympics are coming on in a few weeks, check out what those folks use.

In 2012 every medalist used an O/U. That ought to tell you something about what the best in the world think of autoloaders for skeet.
Many of those guns prices are in 5 figures. For the elite I have no doubt they are better. But for informal shooting auto's have a very strong following and in the under $2000 range you'll get a lot more gun for the money.

I'd rather have a top tier semi-auto and money to spare than a budget O/U.
__________________
Most people don't really want the truth.

They just want constant reassurance that what they believe is the truth
jmr40 is offline  
Old June 17, 2016, 12:29 PM   #16
longknife12
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 24, 2010
Location: colorado
Posts: 537
Back in skeet years, I've shot 1100's, 870's and Browning Purbaugh set...
the O/U was favorite...also used the tube gun in the field! Just didn't like chasing hulls and the fit.
Dan
__________________
"I wish to be remembered that I was the last man of my tribe to surrender my rifle".....Chief Sitting Bull
longknife12 is offline  
Old June 17, 2016, 12:39 PM   #17
j1
Member
 
 
Join Date: October 17, 2011
Location: Nepa
Posts: 900
As long as you are spending your money buy what pleases you most.
__________________
"Only accurate rifles are interesting."
"The 30 06 is never a mistake."
Col Townsend Whelen
j1 is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 09:36 AM   #18
cfullgraf
Member
 
 
Join Date: October 19, 2010
Location: East TN
Posts: 6,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40 View Post
Many of those guns prices are in 5 figures. For the elite I have no doubt they are better.
For active competitive shooters in clay shooting games, reliability is an important feature and the top tier guns are very reliable. These guys and gals shoot ammunition by the pallet load.

But, more down to earth, a Browning Citori or Beretta 686 survive well in a competitive environment and are good entry level competitive guns. When I was actively shooting competitively, I put in excess of 5000 rounds per year for four to five years through my Citori without anything breaking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40 View Post
But for informal shooting auto's have a very strong following and in the under $2000 range you'll get a lot more gun for the money.

I'd rather have a top tier semi-auto and money to spare than a budget O/U.
I agree.

Chasing hulls is the only downside I see with a semi-auto. That is not as important today with the higher cost of reloading components relative to the lower cost of bargain priced ammunition.

Shot gun fit is an important consideration. They all fit a little different unless modified to fit the shooter and can have a definite affect on one's ability to hit the targets.
__________________
Chuck
Real trucks don't have Otto cycles.
My mustang is green fueled, four on the floor and all terrain.
cfullgraf is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 10:23 AM   #19
Jim Watson
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 24, 2002
Posts: 20,867
If you will shoot regulation NSSA Skeet, you need an O/U for the multi-gauge tube sets.

I have shot casual skeet with an Anschutz Miroku O/U bought cheap at a gun show because nobody knew what it was. Shells are the lightest reloads in the book, about 20 ga equivalent. But my ATA Trap singles gun is an 1100 for the lower recoil, although I have an O/U used only for Trap doubles and backup if the gas gun goes down.

The price of shot vs the price of cheap shells has turned a lot of shotgunners off of reloading, in which case an auto throwing your hulls in the weeds would not be a factor.
__________________
Y'all be careful, now, you hear?
Jim Watson is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 02:02 PM   #20
Captcurt
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 9, 2010
Location: Ozark Mountains of Arkansas
Posts: 1,577
Prefer a 20ga for myself.

I have a couple o/u's and prefer the balance of them over an auto-loader, personally. The 20ga Beretta BL-3 has Ballistic Specialties Angle-ported chokes The Verona 501 is a 2-barrel set with 410 and 28ga barrels. The 20 and 28 are really fun for skeet and sporting clays. The recoil of the small bores doesn't pound you as bad as a 12ga. Especially after 100 rounds.

20ga ammo runs about the same cost as a twelve. Handle a 12 and a 20 in the same model and see if the 20 doesn't feel and balance better. JMHO.
__________________
In God we trust, all others pay cash!
Captcurt is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 04:44 PM   #21
JohnnyFlake
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 4, 2011
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 117
You say that you already have an 1100, why would you want to buy anything else? The 1100 is a perfect gun for both skeet and trap. Spend your money on barrels and correct stocks.

A 26" barrel on an 1100 with a straight stock, is the Bees Knees for skeet. and the 1100 with a 32" barrel and a canted stock, is the same for trap!

I shot competition, in both skeet and trap, as part of the Chicago Lincoln Park Team, all through the 1970s & early 80s and that is the only gun I ever used. Of course, I had four of them in the required gauges. I have many 100s under my belt!
JohnnyFlake is online now  
Old June 18, 2016, 04:58 PM   #22
sbwaters
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: January 27, 2016
Posts: 56
A quality shotgun dealer and gunsmith measured me and added 1/2" to the 1100 stock for me. Said that was all I needed. I like it.

I admit it. I don’t want to pick up hulls. :-/
sbwaters is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 05:04 PM   #23
JohnnyFlake
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 4, 2011
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbwaters View Post
A quality shotgun dealer and gunsmith measured me and added 1/2" to the 1100 stock for me. Said that was all I needed. I like it.

I admit it. I don’t want to pick up hulls. :-/
Okay, just leave them be, where they fall. Of course, if you want to reload, that is a different situation.
JohnnyFlake is online now  
Old June 18, 2016, 05:40 PM   #24
bearleft
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 25, 2015
Location: KY
Posts: 9
Shell catcher option

Works well! http://www.amazon.com/Birchwood-Case.../dp/B001U9YK8I
bearleft is offline  
Old June 18, 2016, 10:06 PM   #25
sbwaters
Contributing Member
 
 
Join Date: January 27, 2016
Posts: 56
Wouldn’t a shellcatcher work for high and low house, but not for the doubles?
sbwaters is offline  
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
This site, its contents, Shooting Reviews, and its contents are Copyright (c) 2010-2016 Firearms Forum, Inc.
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
Although The High Road has attempted to provide accurate information on the forum, The High Road assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information. All information is provided "as is" with all faults without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. Neither The High Road nor any of its directors, members, managers, employees, agents, vendors, or suppliers will be liable for any direct, indirect, general, bodily injury, compensatory, special, punitive, consequential, or incidental damages including, without limitation, lost profits or revenues, costs of replacement goods, loss or damage to data arising out of the use or inability to use this forum or any services associated with this forum, or damages from the use of or reliance on the information present on this forum, even if you have been advised of the possibility of such damages.