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Old April 12, 2015, 11:48 AM   #1
cmcgehee
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Newbie needs advise

I have been reloading for a 1911 9mm using 5.9 gns of Ramshot Silhouette with OAL of 1.140. This load works great in the 1911 and I have 2000 rounds in stock. My question is: I have just purchased a Springfield XD Mod.2 9mm. Is it safe to assume this load is also suitable for the Mod.2 or should I work up a new load for each new 9mm gun that I purchase?
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Old April 12, 2015, 11:59 AM   #2
UziLand
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Never used ramshot but do a lot of 9mm. As long as your load is within range (under max), give it a try and see how it performs.
I do differ the loads for my Uzi carbine and my handguns. The Uzi is built like a tank and I have used the IMI "carbine only" rounds. They are hot little rounds I would not like to try in my pistol. After all, it does say "carb" on the headstamp.
Have fun......
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Old April 12, 2015, 12:22 PM   #3
cmcgehee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UziLand View Post
Never used ramshot but do a lot of 9mm. As long as your load is within range (under max), give it a try and see how it performs.
I do differ the loads for my Uzi carbine and my handguns. The Uzi is built like a tank and I have used the IMI "carbine only" rounds. They are hot little rounds I would not like to try in my pistol. After all, it does say "carb" on the headstamp.
Have fun......
Thanks, UziLand....I am at the max. for this load @ 5.9 gns. Anything below that would not cycle my 1911 right. I will try it in the Mod.2. I just did not want to have different loads for each pistol if I did not have to.
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Old April 12, 2015, 02:09 PM   #4
blarby
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If the loads are "in spec" ( length, charge, bullet type/weight, girth) there should be no danger in using them in your other firearm.

Whether they work as well in the springfield as they do in the 1911....well... Welcome to handloading for multiple firearms You've just found another fun rabbithole.
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Old April 12, 2015, 02:26 PM   #5
higgite
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You might want to remove the barrel from the firearm and do the plunk test with your reloads to make sure that OAL doesn’t put the bullet into the lands. I ran into that with my CZ with ammo I had loaded for other pistols. The CZ is famous (infamous?) for having a short leade. Your XD may be perfectly okay with 1.140” OAL, but don’t assume anything. If you change bullet types, brands, weights, etc., check it again.

And welcome to the forum.
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Old April 12, 2015, 02:44 PM   #6
Sunray
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"...assume this load is also suitable for..." There's suitable meaning safe and suitable meaning accurate. Ain't the same. You should work up the load for each firearm regardless of its chambering.
What bullet weight? 5.9 of Ramshot Silhouette is max for a 124 GS and a plated 115. If you just picked the 5.9, you need to work up the load.
"...Anything below that would not cycle my 1911 right..." Nope. There's no reason to assume that you need max loads at all. Reloading is about accuracy and tailoring the load to your firearm. Very few pistols, of any flavour, will not cycle with minimum loads.
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Old April 12, 2015, 04:22 PM   #7
cmcgehee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunray View Post
"...assume this load is also suitable for..." There's suitable meaning safe and suitable meaning accurate. Ain't the same. You should work up the load for each firearm regardless of its chambering.
What bullet weight? 5.9 of Ramshot Silhouette is max for a 124 GS and a plated 115. If you just picked the 5.9, you need to work up the load.
"...Anything below that would not cycle my 1911 right..." Nope. There's no reason to assume that you need max loads at all. Reloading is about accuracy and tailoring the load to your firearm. Very few pistols, of any flavour, will not cycle with minimum loads.
I started with the published start load and worked up in .2 increments. The only load that would cycle reliable was the 5.9. I am using 115 plated bullets and my 1911 is a Taurus. I just got ahold of some True Blue and worked up from starting load with 115 plated bullets and it also took close to maximum load before the slide would cycle. Anything below that would fire one time and would not chamber another round.

I was referring to safe when I spoke of suitable. Thanks for the info,
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Old April 12, 2015, 05:34 PM   #8
Lost Sheep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmcgehee View Post
Thanks, UziLand....I am at the max. for this load @ 5.9 gns. Anything below that would not cycle my 1911 right. I will try it in the Mod.2. I just did not want to have different loads for each pistol if I did not have to.
Welcome to the foum and thanks for asking our advice.

How many rounds have gone through that 1911? I ask because a properly broken in pistol should not require maximum loads to cycle it. (This is just my opinion, but to believe a gun manufacturer would put out a product with slide weight and recoil spring "tuned" to require maximum loads boggles my mind.)

If your slide rails are rough, or recoil spring too strong, you may want to consider tuning your pistol to a more moderate load. Do you have access to a chronograph?

By the way, when firing loads too light to cycle your pistol, how is your grip? Your hand and forearm are part of the "tuning" of your pistol, and a too-loose grip can cause failures to cycle. also. I discovered this is a handy way to practice clearance drills. Using target-power loads, I can fire my pistol and, by gripping less tightly, induce a failure mid-magazine.

Ideally, you would find a load that has adequate power, is accurate in both pistols and then tune the pistols to cycle reliably. Ensure your rails are properly worn in and lubricated (some pistols like to run "drier" than others). Then swap recoil springs, light enough to ensure cycling and heavy enough that the frame is not battered until you achieve harmony.

Good luck. Good shooting.

Lost Sheep
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Old April 12, 2015, 05:59 PM   #9
cmcgehee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Sheep View Post
Welcome to the foum and thanks for asking our advice.

How many rounds have gone through that 1911? I ask because a properly broken in pistol should not require maximum loads to cycle it. (This is just my opinion, but to believe a gun manufacturer would put out a product with slide weight and recoil spring "tuned" to require maximum loads boggles my mind.)

If your slide rails are rough, or recoil spring too strong, you may want to consider tuning your pistol to a more moderate load. Do you have access to a chronograph?

By the way, when firing loads too light to cycle your pistol, how is your grip? Your hand and forearm are part of the "tuning" of your pistol, and a too-loose grip can cause failures to cycle. also. I discovered this is a handy way to practice clearance drills. Using target-power loads, I can fire my pistol and, by gripping less tightly, induce a failure mid-magazine.

Ideally, you would find a load that has adequate power, is accurate in both pistols and then tune the pistols to cycle reliably. Ensure your rails are properly worn in and lubricated (some pistols like to run "drier" than others). Then swap recoil springs, light enough to ensure cycling and heavy enough that the frame is not battered until you achieve harmony.

Good luck. Good shooting.

Lost Sheep
Lot of good advice, Lost Sheep. I have run approx. 1200 rounds through this gun. The rails have been polished. I do not have a chronograph. I have never had a problem with my grip before..I grip tight & think I have a good forearm stance. The strange thing is I do not have a problem with factory target loads which tells me I am probably doing something wrong. I guess the best thing to do is start from scratch and do everything over. I have verified my powder weights and I am using the minimum OCL with a very light crimp.
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Old April 12, 2015, 06:07 PM   #10
Lost Sheep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmcgehee View Post
Lot of good advice, Lost Sheep. I have run approx. 1200 rounds through this gun. The rails have been polished. I do not have a chronograph. I have never had a problem with my grip before..I grip tight & think I have a good forearm stance. The strange thing is I do not have a problem with factory target loads which tells me I am probably doing something wrong. I guess the best thing to do is start from scratch and do everything over. I have verified my powder weights and I am using the minimum OCL with a very light crimp.
Minimum OAL will deliver higher initial pressures, but light crimp (less case tension/friction/grip on the bullet will tend to lower initial pressures. A little distance before the bullet hits the rifling tends to lower pressures, but a little later in the burn time. But you probably already know all that.

That you do not have a cycling problem with factory target loads tells ME than you do not have a problem (or are we just phrasing the same conclusion differently....that's probably it.)

What dies are you using? What brass? Some dies will set you up for looser neck tension. Some brass is thinner than other brands. My memory is drawing a blank right now on which is which, but someone here will know.

You are discovering that reloading is as much an art as it is a science, with a bit of randomness thrown in.

Be safe, always, all ways.

If I think of something helpful, I will be back. Right now, a couple hours out of the house.

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; April 12, 2015 at 06:12 PM.
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Old April 12, 2015, 06:25 PM   #11
cmcgehee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Sheep View Post
Minimum OAL will deliver higher initial pressures, but light crimp (less case tension/friction/grip on the bullet will tend to lower initial pressures. A little distance before the bullet hits the rifling tends to lower pressures, but a little later in the burn time. But you probably already know all that.

That you do not have a cycling problem with factory target loads tells ME than you do not have a problem (or are we just phrasing the same conclusion differently....that's probably it.)

What dies are you using? What brass? Some dies will set you up for looser neck tension. Some brass is thinner than other brands. My memory is drawing a blank right now on which is which, but someone here will know.

You are discovering that reloading is as much an art as it is a science, with a bit of randomness thrown in.

Be safe, always, all ways.

If I think of something helpful, I will be back. Right now, a couple hours out of the house.

Lost Sheep
I am using the carbide dies in the Lee Classic 4 die turret. I am using Winchester brass and Rainier 115 plated bullets. Safety is always my main priority.
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Old April 12, 2015, 08:47 PM   #12
Twiki357
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My first thought is did you buy the 1911 new or used? If it was used, the prior owner may have put in a heavier spring for heavy (+P) loads. Or Taurus may have installed a heavier than normal spring.
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Old April 12, 2015, 09:18 PM   #13
cmcgehee
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I bought it new. I don't guess there is really anything wrong with using a heavy load for target practice as long as it is still within specs...this load is very accurate and shows no signs of over pressure.
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