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Old October 21, 2014, 11:32 AM   #1
Schwing
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Lee Pro 1000 or Loadmaster?

I currently own a pro 1000 and am among the crowd that loves it. After a few mods, I have zero problems with it. It easily cranks out the 100-400 rounds I shoot per week and, in the 2 years I have used it, I have not had to replace a single part on it. I only reload handgun calibers and, eventually will reload .223 but no rifle ammo aside.

I want to get a second press so that I can keep one set up permanently for .357 and use the other for everything else. I was wondering if anyone out there has owned both and would vouch for one over the other. I understand the merits of a 5 station vs a 3 but does it really matter if I only reload for handgun calibers?

The Pro 1000 seems the logical choice since all of my turrets etc are already on hand. I have just about pulled the trigger on another pro 1000 a few times but I keep coming back to the Loadmaster. It just looks like a heavier and more substantial press. It also seems like Lee has improved the priming system for the Loadmaster recently. If anyone has any experience with it, I would be interested. Does the old wood ball handle make it awkward?

I understand that many of you hate lee presses and are going to recommend a Dillon or Hornady etc... I am not looking for that kind of advice. I am looking for folks who own or have used both and can compare. Thanks!
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Old October 21, 2014, 02:07 PM   #2
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The Loadmaster seems like a great press until you start to use it and discover what a bad idea priming on the upstroke is. Forget about it unless you like crushed sideways primers.
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Old October 21, 2014, 04:49 PM   #3
Lost Sheep
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But WHY?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wally View Post
The Loadmaster seems like a great press until you start to use it and discover what a bad idea priming on the upstroke is. Forget about it unless you like crushed sideways primers.
There is nothing about the priming system on either Lee progressive that cannot be fixed by proper operation and proper maintenance. For that matter, the faults in Dillon's, Hornady's and RCBS' priming systems share the same characteristic (whatever fault they may have being curable).

Fact is, difficulties with the priming system on the Pro-1000 is one of the things that prompted me to switch to the Lee Classic Turret. I could have accommodated the primer chute (never let it get empty, never let it collect spent primer debris). But that choice is another thread. My point is that all presses have their quirks. If YOUR press' quirks bother you, adapt or switch. If you wish to recommend a course of action to another person, consider the worth of your input. A(as valuable as your bare vote is, sharing the reasoning behind the vote would make your post infinitely more valuable.

My question, then, Wally, is, "Did you ever figure out what was the actual CAUSE of the sideways primers was? I know it is not native to upstroke priming, but must have some additional contributing (and curable) cause, else all Loadmasters would have this failing.

Respectfully, and with great expectations, for I know your posts in the past to be well-reasoned,

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; October 21, 2014 at 05:44 PM.
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Old October 21, 2014, 05:08 PM   #4
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My edits came in as new posts. Had to delete the extras

My edits came in as new posts. Had to delete the extras

Last edited by Lost Sheep; October 21, 2014 at 05:13 PM. Reason: My edits came in as new posts. Had to delete the extras
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Old October 21, 2014, 05:09 PM   #5
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Oops

My edits came in as new posts. Had to delete the extras

Last edited by Lost Sheep; October 21, 2014 at 05:14 PM. Reason: My edits came in as new posts. Had to delete the extras
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Old October 21, 2014, 05:11 PM   #6
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Why a whole press?

Some folks in your circumstances elect to simply buy some extra Pro-1000 carriers and die disks for each caliber. Change the whole carrier in a minute or two at about a third of the price of a new press (I think, don't quote me).

Others elect to make their dedicated-to-one caliber press their existing progressive press and choose the second, multi-caliber press, to be the Lee Classic Turret. Caliber swaps complete in well under a minute at about $12 for a turret disk plus whatever the dies cost plus an extra powder measure if you want that convenience.

With auto-advancing, it is as naturally adapted to continuous processing as the progressive and throughput about a half to a third the quantity of a true progressive (though, in my case, throughput did not suffer at all). That is, once you factor in all processes (start with clean undeprimed brass and end with boxed, finished, shootable ammunition).

The Classic Turret could be a viable alternative if your lower round count calibers allow. Besides the Classic Turret can take full-size rifle rounds, including the magnums with room to spare for manually placing bullets on case mouths. Caliber swaps take seconds, literally, seconds and are cheap (just a turret disk, dies, shell holder and, if you so choose, a dedicated powder measure).

Two alternatives you may not have tossed in the mix, but could.

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; October 21, 2014 at 05:57 PM.
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Old October 21, 2014, 05:59 PM   #7
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I have a pro1000. There was a thread recently where we discussed it and went box to bench and loaded rounds. Mine has operated flawlessly and has mid produced several thousand rounds in a little less than two months. I couldn't be happier.


If it were me and it was going to be only pistol I would get another pro1000. Of get a complete carrier, turret and dies. You can change carriers quickly.
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Old October 21, 2014, 07:10 PM   #8
Schwing
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Quote:
Why a whole press?
Some folks in your circumstances elect to simply buy some extra Pro-1000 carriers and die disks for each caliber. Change the whole carrier in a minute or two at about a third of the price of a new press (I think, don't quote me).
I have given a lot of thought to this and have not ruled it out. My peeve with .357 is that I also reload .38s. My dies will do both but I get them dialed into that sweet spot for .357 and then really struggle to want to change them when doing .38s. The obvious solution was just to buy another set of dies and a turret but, by the time I do that, I am at about $50 or $60. It is a bit of a stretch but, to me, it just makes more logical sense to spend the extra $100 and get an entire press setup to do .357.

This would also give me the option of keeping one press with the small carrier in it and another with the large... yes, I am that lazy
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Old October 21, 2014, 07:25 PM   #9
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I load 38 and 357 only pro 1000. It takes less than five minutes to set the dies. The most time is setting the powder/expander. The seating/ crimping is easy if you keep a dummy round. I just make it a point to load a bunch before I switch it.
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Old October 21, 2014, 08:01 PM   #10
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48/357 44Spec/44Mag

I solve that problem by simply never using Special brass. When I load to Special power levels, I do it in Magnum cases and watch my velocity levels.

35 Colt and 454 Casull, I concede to keeping two different inventories of brass and adjust dies as I have a 45 Colt gun as well as Casull. The 38 Special brass I (rarely) find on the range, I give to my friend.

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Old October 21, 2014, 09:39 PM   #11
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Thanks for all of the replies guys.

I just did what, probably, is the most efficient thing. I ordered another turret and a set of .357 dies. I own guns that are .38s so using strictly .357 brass would rule out reloading for them. I also know it doesn't take long to adjust the dies between .38 and .357 but my OCD really struggles with the change after I have them dialed in the way I like them. I only reload 1 bullet in .357 so I like the idea of having the 1 turret that I never have to touch.

While I have really enjoyed my pro 1000 and am happy with it, I think I will put the new press on the back burner until I have enough freedom money to try out a Dillon or a Hornady. Honestly though, that will probably be a long time since the setup I have now seems to cover my needs and there are many... many firearms out there that are butting in line for the same $$

Thanks guys!
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Old October 21, 2014, 10:07 PM   #12
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Darn!

I was getting so excited about spending your money!

What's right for you is best. Patience is a virtue.

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Old October 21, 2014, 10:10 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwing View Post
my OCD really struggles with the change after I have them dialed in the way I like them. I only reload 1 bullet in .357 so I like the idea of having the 1 turret that I never have to touch.

Thanks guys!
Transfer your OCD away from keeping dies' adjustment and to adjusting dies perfectly... Solved

You are welcome.

LS
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Old October 22, 2014, 08:19 AM   #14
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One has to look at the cost of convenience and available space. When I got my first lee 1000 back in the early eighties I did the carrier and turrent addition one time I think . The difference then was like 30.00 for a whole press so I ended up with 6 presses and a few carriers. On something like 38-357 an extra turrent makes great sense, I just did that last year with a .45 colt that works with the lee .44 carrier. I like my lee 1000's and still have 4 I think even though I have a dillon 550-650 and 1050. Sometimes its not worth changing out dillon stuff when I can just go load a few hundred on the already set up lee...
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Old October 23, 2014, 01:56 AM   #15
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The updated priming system on the Loadmaster just plain works. I set mine up last month and I have reloaded about 2k rds through it so far. Absolutely no problems with flipped primers. I'm really happy with the press. The loadmaster will now compliment my well-used Lee Turret.

You do have to adjust the carriage alignment out of the box, despite what the instructions say. It's easy and takes about a minute.
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Old October 23, 2014, 01:58 AM   #16
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That's my experience with the pro1000 too. All the nightmare stories seem to be from people that don't have patience or can't follow directions. I'm not trying to paint with a broad brush but I know several people now that all have the same experience you and I have with Lee progressives.
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