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Old April 27, 2016, 05:34 PM   #1
danez71
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Which book for a NEW reloader?

A couple of people have (wisely) suggested I get a book about reloading.


I'm interested in both metallic and shotgun reloading. I wouldn't try to do both at the same time but a book that has both would be best..... maybe?

(My own self evaluation says I need the most help with shotgun reloading)

Anyways, I appreciate the suggestions so 'Thank You'.


One of the suggestions was for The ABCs of Reloading. I saw a 5 yr old thread on TFL and it had mixed reviews of 'its a waste' to 'Ive reloaded for 30 years and I still reference it'.


Some load data would be nice as reference/examples but I expect that a separate book of load recipe's would be a future book.


So what book does everyone suggest as a starter book?
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Old April 27, 2016, 05:46 PM   #2
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More than 1.
Hornady, Sierra, Lyman being my first choices. Lee a second choice.
What bullets will you load? If they have a manual - get theirs.

Shotgun, me = not much help.
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Old April 27, 2016, 05:48 PM   #3
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ABC's of reloading? While some swear by it I never saw it as being any better or worse than the preface to any real good hand loading manual but that being just my opinion. The current Lyman 49th edition comes to mind but in my experience any real good reloading manual like Hornady or Speer normally has a preface section dedicated to explaining everything the new hand loader could want to know.

As a side note. While most manuals like those I mentioned cover rifle and handgun I really do not know of a book or manual that does a good job with both. I suggest a good book dedicated to shotgun. Talk to the guys that shoot trap & skeet on a regular basis as I think I have loaded a dozen shot shells over my entire loading life.

Anyway, the preface of the Lyman 49th is a good start, again The ABC's of reloading I can take or leave and I would get a separate book dedicated to shotgun. Also, check the sticky notes in the forums as books are suggested there, may as well use the forum materials. Reloading Library of Wisdom.

Just My Take....
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Old April 27, 2016, 05:49 PM   #4
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To get started, one of the first three books on this page...

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...eloading+books

I taught myself how to reload by reading everything I could get my hands on and asking questions here. Don't cheap out on books. Read everything you can, especially if you don't have someone there to guide you.
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Old April 27, 2016, 06:12 PM   #5
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Shotgun me = not much help either.

I have the Lyman 49th and Lymans Pistol and Revolver handbook 3rd edition. They are copyright 2008 and 2004 respectively. The books cover the basics quite well because the process itself is pretty much the same. Downside is the load data has not been updated to include some very nice new powder formulations that are available and in most cases quite obtainable. I started by reading those 2 books, watching youtube videos, and lurking on forums on the internet reading everything I could. The books Cheesemaker suggests are a great start. Your computer is the other reference source that will fill in the blanks for you because you can communicate with the wise and learned people that can be found here.
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Old April 27, 2016, 07:27 PM   #6
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If I had to start with one manual, it would be Lyman's. They cover a good array of bullets, not just one brand.

But for shotgun, not sure?!
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Old April 27, 2016, 08:11 PM   #7
danez71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesemaker View Post
More than 1.
Hornady, Sierra, Lyman being my first choices. Lee a second choice.
What bullets will you load? If they have a manual - get theirs.

Shotgun, me = not much help.

I'd like to do 9mm and 12ga.

The 9mm will be just normal range stuff.

In 12ga, I want to reload real light.

My idea is to settle on one normal target load when I buy loaded shells and keep accumulating the empties and then reload those real lite for fun and practice.
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Old April 27, 2016, 08:58 PM   #8
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Which book for a NEW reloader?

ABC's is good, as are the Lyman manuals (49th is the latest edition, but the earlier ones are just as good for a beginner).

shotgun = no help here either
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Old April 27, 2016, 09:28 PM   #9
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Never saw a manual with shotgun and metallic data (except the little free pamphlets at the gun stores).
For shotguns, you really have recipes. You need the same case, same wad, and the specific powder charge for the specific shot called out. As far as I have seen, there is no load development.
Metallic loading calls for one to start at the start load and work up, watching for pressure signs. Pressures are higher and a change in powder lot can make a difference. Next, you have a wide range of bullets, with a manual only showing load data for one specific bullet. Based in variables, you have to start at the start load and work up.
Thus, you need several manuals for metallic loading.
I find Richard Lee's #2 to be very valuable, but will always have Lyman and Hornady manuals.
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Old April 27, 2016, 09:47 PM   #10
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When he asked What bullets will you load?, I believe he meant what brand of bullets. Hornady bullets = Hornady manual, Speer bullets = Speer manual, and so on.
Lyman’s 49th is good, but if you are not loading for rifle, Lyman’s Pistol and Revolver has the same data, just no rifle data.
I don’t think you will find a better shotgun manual than Lyman’s Shotshell Handbook.
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Old April 27, 2016, 10:29 PM   #11
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As you see already there are several suggestions but Lyman seems to be on every list, including Minnesota.

IMO The Lyman 49th Edition manual is great.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/106...loading-manual

If you are going to load cast bullets I recommend the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook 4th Edition. It's not just a reprint of the Lyman 49.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/867...h-edition-book

There really aren't any printed manuals that supply handgun, rifle and shotgun load data. The powder companies do supply yearly manuals with all the data and their online data too. For a printed manual again I suggest Lyman, their 5th Edition Shotshell Handbook.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/887...loading-manual

Other load manual choice could be from the bullets you choose to use most. I have been using a lot of Hornady bullets the past few years so I bought the Hornady manual.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/575...loading-manual

*Edit*
I see X-Ring above already said a lot of what I just said. We both can't be wrong lol...
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Old April 27, 2016, 10:51 PM   #12
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Lyman 49, Hornady, and a 1979 (print date) speer, and all the Nosler data I needed printed off their website placed in document protectors in a 3 ring binder.
Point being there is no limit to the amount of reverence manuals one should have.

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Old April 28, 2016, 09:10 AM   #13
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Quote:
ABC's of reloading? While some swear by it I never saw it as being any better or worse than the preface to any real good hand loading manual but that being just my opinion. The current Lyman 49th edition comes to mind but in my experience any real good reloading manual like Hornady or Speer normally has a preface section dedicated to explaining everything the new hand loader could want to know.
I agree. I still have an ancient copy of ABCs, but when I started reloading, I found nothing it that was not in the Speer #9 manual that came with my RCBS kit. For that matter, I thought the Speer instructions were better written.

Shotshell reloading has little in common with metallic, and the best manuals are shotshell specific. I think mine was an old Lyman. Shotgun loading is mostly set volume measurements, simpler, and doesn't require the judgment calls of metallic cartridges. You simply duplicate a listed recipe, and there is no room to alter or "work up" any changes to that recipe, or it will no longer be a proper "fit" in the case. The instructions on using your specific equipment are more helpful than general shotshell reloading instruction.

For the beginner, the Lee Load-All is super cheap, and has all the shot/powder bushings included, and even load data. If you decide you are getting serious, you'll want to upgrade later ( I still use mine from the 80's) , but these are simple to learn on, and probably don't cost any more than a shotshell how-to manual.
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Old April 28, 2016, 10:00 AM   #14
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As stated above, metallic reloading and shotshell are very different animals - you need two different manuals. Lyman Shotshell manual was the best for me last time I looked, but I got into shotshell reloading way back in the mid 70s using a Mec 600 jr. and have changed nothing since then. There may or may not be better references available now, but I found nothing lacking in the Lyman manual, so that is still where I would advise someone to start today.

For metallic, I think the Lyman 49th is an excellent book, but I actually think that Richard Lee's Modern Reloading has more and better information for someone just getting started - you cannot go wrong with either one. I would actually want both, but start with Lee's.

The only caveat I will give you is to do your best to ignore brand-specific advice in any manual. When a manual is published by anyone who also sells equipment, they will obviously tell you how great their stuff is and not talk much about their competitors. Realize that all major brands make good gear. You can find lots of different threads discussing best choices for a new reloader, so I won't belabor that much here other than to say that my personal opinion is that while the brand does not matter, a new loader should ONLY start with a quality O-frame cast iron single stage press of similar construction to the RCBS Rock Chucker (many cheaper options than that specific one, most are as good but none better). Do NOT buy a C-frame or aluminum press. Just my opinions . . .

Lastly, you will obviously be looking for thoughts and opinions of experienced loaders to decide on what gear to buy - that is wise. But seriously consider this - when you see someone bashing a particular brand as a whole, totally ignore anything they have to say; they are simply bigoted fools. On the other hand, if they offer specific design features or technical points why they feel choosing X item is better than Y item, then you will have some actual information to use in determining if you want to agree with them or not.

Good luck getting started, I know you will enjoy the hobby.
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Old April 28, 2016, 10:42 AM   #15
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Lyman and Speer are my 2 favorite for metallic cartridges.

I've dabbled a bit in shotshell stuff, but do not know much about that.
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Old April 28, 2016, 11:29 AM   #16
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Lyman Accurate & Sierra are all good and give you some very good info. Read it then reread it before starting to reload. GOOD LUCK One thing I do when reloading I lock every one out so that there is NO one to talk to me while reloading!!
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Old April 28, 2016, 12:51 PM   #17
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Just to add to my first post, when it comes to equipment I agree with a post above, don't get caught up in brand wars. Pick the tools that will fill your need. I can tell you there is nothing at all wrong with Lee products but RCBS has the most unbelievable CS department in the entire world. I own and use products from RCBS, Lee, Hornady, Forsters, Lyman and a few others and all do what they were intended to do.
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Old April 28, 2016, 03:08 PM   #18
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I've only had one, my original "Modern Reloading" by R. Lee. I'm not even sure how I got started with Lee, but I believe it had to do with the product brochure I picked up at a local gun shop years ago: very user-friendly and reminded me of beer-brewing books that inspire confidence (and sell products) by making something intimidating sound easy. That one brochure earned my enduring loyalty, and although I've purchased equipment from other manufacturers from time to time I've never really felt the need to purchase any other reloading manual.
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Old April 28, 2016, 03:20 PM   #19
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Lyman's shot gun manual is the standard by which all others are measured.

As for metallic reloading I suggest you by the manual from who ever makes the bullets you want to shoot from your rifle. Unless your shooting Nosler's, their loading data is free on their web site. If that is the case pick up another manual like Honrady's or Speers, or Sierra's.

I also recommend that you by a book like Lyman's metallic reloading had book as well. As others have said it covers a good variety of components.
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Old April 28, 2016, 03:51 PM   #20
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This is the most-often asked question on all the reloading forums and a search will give you lots of answers.

Lyman #49 is always my answer.
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Old April 28, 2016, 04:10 PM   #21
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The Lyman book is tops for shotshell loading. Also, this one isn't bad, "Reloading for Shotgunners": Reloading for Shotgunners by Rick Sapp

For metallic, Lyman #49, as stated, is probably the best for all things reloading metallic cartridges.

The good manuals give you information, not just load recipes.
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Old April 28, 2016, 04:14 PM   #22
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For metallic: Speer and Hornady were the first two I bought, and both have excellent front material. Lyman is especially good/essential if you plan on loading lead (unjacketed) bullets. Any 2 of those 3 would be a great start.

For shotgun: No opinion. As others have noted, it's a totally different animal. Different gear, different process, different approach... not going to be in the same book.
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Old April 28, 2016, 06:13 PM   #23
danez71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by X-Ring View Post
When he asked What bullets will you load?, I believe he meant what brand of bullets. Hornady bullets = Hornady manual, Speer bullets = Speer manual, and so on. Lymanís 49th is good, but if you are not loading for rifle, Lymanís Pistol and Revolver has the same data, just no rifle data.
I donít think you will find a better shotgun manual than Lymanís Shotshell Handbook.


I was thinking 'caliber & ga'; not 'bullets'.


Quote:
As for metallic reloading I suggest you by the manual from who ever makes the bullets you want to shoot from your rifle. Unless your shooting Nosler's, their loading data is free on their web site. If that is the case pick up another manual like Honrady's or Speers, or Sierra's.

Both of you said that...Oh crude, I didn't know that either!

I don't have brand loyalty for bullets. My normal play fodder is WWB, UMC, Federal, S&B... what ever. I probably have about 1k of each of those now (in completed store bought form)


Do you happen to know which brand of bullets those mfg's use?

If there is enough commonality, Id just assume stick to what ever brand those guys are using.



In effort to consolidate:


Quote:
IMO The Lyman 49th Edition manual is great.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/106...loading-manual

If you are going to load cast bullets I recommend the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook 4th Edition. It's not just a reprint of the Lyman 49.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/867...h-edition-book

<snip>. For a printed manual again I suggest Lyman, their 5th Edition Shotshell Handbook.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/887...loading-manual

Other load manual choice could be from the bullets you choose to use most. I have been using a lot of Hornady bullets the past few years so I bought the Hornady manual.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/575...loading-manual

I see Lyman comes up most.... then it seems Speer, Nosler, Sierra. Great info. That was nice to take the time to provide the links. Thanks.


Quote:
For the beginner, the Lee Load-All is super cheap, and has all the shot/powder bushings included, and even load data. If you decide you are getting serious, you'll want to upgrade later ( I still use mine from the 80's) , but these are simple to learn on, and probably don't cost any more than a shotshell how-to manual.
(That's ^^^ me! Well, I'm not even a beginner, yet)


Quote:
"Modern Reloading" by R. Lee. <snip snip snip by me/danz71> - making something intimidating sound easy

Quote:
The Lyman book is tops for shotshell loading. Also, this one isn't bad, "Reloading for Shotgunners": Reloading for Shotgunners by Rick Sapp

Quote:
For metallic: Speer and Hornady were the first two I bought, and both have excellent front material. Lyman is especially good/essential if you plan on loading lead (unjacketed) bullets. Any 2 of those 3 would be a great start.

I wanted to consolidate for myself and in case anyone else is directed to this thread in the future.


Just because I didn't quote you.... doesn't mean I don't appreciate your input.


Thanks again.
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Old April 28, 2016, 11:37 PM   #24
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Quote:
I don't have brand loyalty for bullets.
You will most likely find one brand that you prefer. It may be because of cost, performance, or availability, or a combination of these.

Quote:
My normal play fodder is WWB, UMC, Federal, S&B... what ever. I probably have about 1k of each of those now (in completed store bought form)

Do you happen to know which brand of bullets those mfg's use?
For the most part the big ammunition companies make their own bullets. Federal and Speer are sister companies and may at times make each others bullets. Some companies do not make all their bullet varieties available to reloaders all of the time. Winchester and Remington for example only sell surplus to reloaders.
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Old April 28, 2016, 11:49 PM   #25
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I don't like the Lyman metallic book. They don't list very many powders per boolit.

I would go with the Lee modern reloading 2. Good info in the front and lots of powder choices on most common bullet weights.
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