Quantcast
How to do the World's best oil finish - Page 9 - THR
THR  

Go Back   THR > Ammunition, Gear, and Firearm Help > Gunsmithing and Repairs

Welcome to THR
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have, access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!


If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit the help section.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 29, 2012, 08:48 PM   #201
dfariswheel
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 26, 2002
Posts: 5,990
Use all sand paper dry.

One method for a smoother finish and to clean sanding dust out and open the grain for a finish is to "whisker" the wood.

Use a damp sponge or rag to wet the wood a section at a time. While the wood is still damp, use a heat gun or stove burner to heat the wood and force dry it.
This will cause the moisture to turn to steam and this blasts the sanding dust out of the grain and opens the grain up.

It also causes tiny splinters of wood to stand up. Use 0000 steel wool or a synthetic polishing pad to gently rub the wood lengthwise.
Steel wool or the synthetic pad will catch these tiny splinters and cut them off, where sand paper will just press them back down.

Depending on the wood, you may have to whisker it 2 to 3 times to remove all the splinters. When you dry the last time, don't rub it down.
This will leave the grain clean ans open for the first coat of finish.

Be careful not to scorch the wood by over heating, you just want to dry it, and you can easily see it dry.
Also, after the last dry, use a vacuum to vacuum off any dirt left on the surface.
dfariswheel is offline  
Old May 30, 2014, 06:01 AM   #202
myrtlesheetz
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 30, 2014
Posts: 1
wow! this gun looks very awesome
myrtlesheetz is offline  
Old May 30, 2014, 10:35 AM   #203
Khornet
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 30, 2002
Location: NH
Posts: 1,852
Here's how it comes out

With the oil finish wet-sanding technique. A 1948 Winchester 52B I got cheap with ruined wood but good metal. Got a Wenig rough blank, inletted the metal, shaped with a draw-knife and scrapers, glass-bedded. Was going to checker but my daughter says no. Left-handed stock but righty action.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMAG0115.jpg (78.2 KB, 64 views)
__________________
The M1 does MY talking!
Khornet is offline  
Old May 30, 2014, 10:38 AM   #204
Khornet
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 30, 2002
Location: NH
Posts: 1,852
Model 52B

Having trouble with attachments. Here's another. Buttplate is ebony I got from a luthier.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMAG0119.jpg (62.8 KB, 82 views)
__________________
The M1 does MY talking!
Khornet is offline  
Old December 27, 2014, 11:09 AM   #205
xitnet
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 9, 2014
Posts: 1
Not sure if anyone is still following this thread but found a faster way to completely fill the grain on a new stock.

I save the sanding dust and use it to fill the grain. Apply a heavy coat of Minwax with a brush and smooth it out with you finger. Then dip the tip of your finger in the dust and rub it in to the stock. After 3-4 hours, sand it down with 220 and then 320 grit sand paper. The finish is not hard and will continue to fill the grain. After two or three coats of doing this, all the grain will be completely filled.

Had a small split on the left side of the butt on a beautiful new exhibition grade walnut stock and it absolutely filled it up on the third try. Can't even see where it was.

Thank you dfariswheel for starting this topic 7 years ago.
xitnet is offline  
Old December 30, 2014, 10:10 PM   #206
dfariswheel
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 26, 2002
Posts: 5,990
Filling the grain with saw dust will usually give a "muddy" look to the finish and prevent good absorption of the first coats of finish.

I whisker the wood by wetting it, drying with heat to make the tiny splinters stand up, then wipe the wood with a Scotchbrite pad.
The pad will catch and cut the tiny splinters off instead of just pressing them back down like sand paper will.
I used to use 0000 steel wool, until I realized that steel wool is soaked with oil to prevent it from rusting.
The oil can contaminate stock finishes.

After whiskering several times, I dampen the wood and quickly dry one more time but don't rub down.
When the damp wood is dried with a stove burner or heat gun the water flashes to steam.
This actually steam cleans the wood by blasting out the sanding dust.
This opens up the grain so the first coats of finish can soak in deeper.

However, if you have a crack or defect the sanding dust works very well to patch or conceal the damage.
Old time stock workers would mix sanding dust with glue to make a filler that would match the wood.
Today, you can use one hour epoxy to make filler or patch material.
dfariswheel is offline  
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise.
This site, its contents, Shooting Reviews, and its contents are Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Firearms Forum, Inc.
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
Although The High Road has attempted to provide accurate information on the forum, The High Road assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information. All information is provided "as is" with all faults without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. Neither The High Road nor any of its directors, members, managers, employees, agents, vendors, or suppliers will be liable for any direct, indirect, general, bodily injury, compensatory, special, punitive, consequential, or incidental damages including, without limitation, lost profits or revenues, costs of replacement goods, loss or damage to data arising out of the use or inability to use this forum or any services associated with this forum, or damages from the use of or reliance on the information present on this forum, even if you have been advised of the possibility of such damages.