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Old April 20, 2007, 02:08 PM   #376
Z_Infidel
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I've never used the cross bolt safety on my Marlins, I use the traditional half cock method. It's just the way it should be done!
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Old April 20, 2007, 03:40 PM   #377
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I only use the one on the winnie when hunting and crossing fences.
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Old April 20, 2007, 04:58 PM   #378
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VET, good recommendations on the X-bolt safety. Makes good sense.
If one can just develop that habit, it sounds reasonable.
__________

Re: quality of A's & W's. Even though I was reading in several threads (bookmarked somewhere in my enormous bookmark list) that there was no workmanship differences among A, C & W, that there were only cosmetic differences, I still had a nagging little suspicion that there may be some workmanship differences.

I bought an A anyway, because I specifically wanted the birch stock instead of walnut, and the fore end cap instead of bands (reasons for both stated elsewhere in this thread).

Even after a lot of levering (though of course, not enough yet), the action is still pretty stiff, and the lever doesn't always lock up tight against the bottom of the stock at the end of a cycle without an extra "squeeze". It's like it hits something and bounces back unless I'm working the lever really hard (which is more difficult when the rifle is shouldered), so I have to take the extra step to squeeze it into a locked position.

That and an infrequent jam when a new cartridge is moving into the chamber make me think that the rifle needed just another hour or two on the assembly line before getting boxed up.

So, I'm thinking about selling it an buying a Winchester ...

Just kidding!

I'm thinking about taking it down to my smith and have him do some finishing work on the action. I'll bet he could probably make it smooth as butter for not too much money.

I might be able to do it myself, but I'm not even close to being a smith (I'm a biologist, and biologists are even dangerous with hammers, let alone gun tools ), and I've honestly got more money than time right now. I'd probably just rather have it done right and not risk damage because I don't really know what I'm doing.

Nem
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Old April 20, 2007, 05:05 PM   #379
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Hi Nem! Actually other than reasons we all here kow, there are some fine smiths that specialize in the 336 out there in Cowboy action land as well!
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Old April 20, 2007, 10:03 PM   #380
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Quote:
...there are some fine smiths that specialize in the 336 out there in Cowboy action land as well!
Sniper, I think that's a great topic to add here for the club.

What are your (all of you) favorite smiths for 336, even if it involves shipping?

Nem

PS: for Marlin lever buffs,
there's an interesting discussion going on over here about 1895G in .45-70,
in case you want to express an opinion.
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Old April 21, 2007, 12:46 AM   #381
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Current roster, without nicknames

This list was obtained by clicking on the number in the "replies" column for this thread.
A separate window opens listing names of those who have replied along with their reply number.

I pulled the list into a word processor, cut off the reply number, then sorted alphabetically.

Stats:
Members: 97
Replies: 379
Views: 10,861
_N4Z_
.45Guy
4fingermick
Action_Can_Do
Airborne Falcon
applekev
ArfinGreebly
B.D. Turner
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batex
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cane
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chad1043
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christophera
CliffH
CrackerJim
D-Man
Dave Markowitz
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Digital Falcon
Dr.Rob
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electrode1998
Essex County
evil_brother
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fiVe
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THE OUTPATIENT
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Old April 21, 2007, 11:02 AM   #382
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I for one took the possibility that the W might be a little less looked after at the factory into account when I bought it. My budget wouldn’t allow for a more expensive weapon. So between the price and the fact that I bought it at Wal-Mart I wasn’t terribly surprised that it had to go back to the factory immediately. I wish it didn’t have to, but I took my chance and I lost.

I would love to see inexpensive rifles get the very same attention as the multi-thousand dollar double rifles. I really don’t think that will ever happen. That is why the cheap guns are cheap; they had to cut the costs somewhere.

Anyway, I am still looking forward to the return of my rifle. I am sure that with it being the cheaper of the line it will still last well past me with a little TLC.
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Old April 21, 2007, 09:45 PM   #383
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I was able to get to the range today and put about 50 rounds through the 336 30-30. I reported earlier in the thread of a feeding problem with some cartridges getting hung up in the magazine. My gunsmith looked at it and indicated a little judicious filing and smoothing would solve that. He wouldn't be able to get to it for several days so I elected to keep it for the weekend, then take it back the next week.

I noticed when firing, the recoil seemed to alleviate the hanging up problem. Today was the second shooting session since that weekend (I haven't taken it back yet as I wanted to do some more "testing"). So far, the only time I have the problem is if I cycle the action without firing (to unload for cleaning etc). When firing, I have had no failures of any sort.

Although I don't shoot the winchester 94 I inherited from Granddad much, I use the 336 as if it were a vintage levergun; ie as if it had no cross bolt safety. I only use the hammer at half cock for the safety. It "feels" more "authentic" and it keeps the manual of arms the same for all three leverguns (I also inherited a 39a which my boys and I like to shoot as well).

I'm still pondering which sight to get.....either a tang mounted peep or one of the ghost ring types. Some of the time the semi buckhorn works fine but depending on the background around the target, it can be difficult to get a good sight picture.

Overall I'm really happy with the 336. No matter what other shooting we're doing (we enjoy clay busting, pistols, wheel guns, varmint rifle and some nice milsurps .....) I'm always wanting to run a couple of boxes through the Marlin. I'll be getting reloading dies soon .

Sorry for all the rambling but just can't help jabbering about my new favorite long gun.

Good shooting,

Jim
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Old April 21, 2007, 11:24 PM   #384
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Quote:
Sorry for all the rambling but just can't help jabbering about my new favorite long gun.
Hey, no worries about that, Jim. You're in good company here.

Glad to hear you're making good progress on the jam issue. Interesting turn in that story.

Quote:
I am sure that with it being the cheaper of the line it will still last well past me with a little TLC.
Falcon, I'll bet that if there is a difference, it's mostly in finishing details, not materials.

So, I'll bet with time and a lot of shooting, the little details left untouched in our <ahem> lesser refined rifles would smooth out on their own.

I dunno, just thinking out loud here. No truth implied.

Nem
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Old April 22, 2007, 05:39 PM   #385
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I own a Dremel and jewelers rouge. I bet I can sweeten a few things up right out of the box.

I figure they have to do something to make the rifle cost less. I don’t think they used lesser quality materials, but may just a few less minutes of fitting, and maybe not quite as picky about the wood.



Jim,

Since I haven’t fired mine yet I don’t know what is in store for me, but I will keep what you have said in mind if I do feel things binding while cycling the action.

I had planned on not using the safety unless there were exigent circumstances. I figure that is just one more thing to forget about when I need the rifle to go bang. The half-cock is a good way to keep it almost ready to go anyway.
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Old April 23, 2007, 09:59 AM   #386
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Gunsmiths: The custom work done on my 336C was by Mic McPherson. He does excellent work and I am very happy with the results. The work done on my rifle included shortening the barrel and mag tube, accuracy improvements (significant work), and slicking up the action. Here's a link to Mic's web site:

www.levergun.com
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Old April 23, 2007, 11:08 AM   #387
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Skinner Sights Review

Since the 1895 is a VERY close relative of the 336 I'm (cross) posting a review of the Skinner Sight system for 1895 & 336.

The Skinner Sights worked so well on my 39A that I decided to put them on my 1895GS too.

Installation was simple and straight forward. Takes about 5 minutes including drifting out the originally installed open sight. The sight is very well made and I like the look better than the other sights available.

At the range using the original (stock) front beaded sight my Point of Impact (POI) was 9" higher than my Point of Aim at 50 yards with the Skinner Sight in its lowest position.

This was expected. With my order I also purchased the optional front sight for $5 more. Installation was a bit more challenging as the dovetail is VERY tight on the front ramp. I did a tiny bit of filing and then squeezed in the sight post with a vise (two man operation). Unfortunately one of the ramp attachment screws is below the dovetail so it must stay on the rifle during installation.

With the new front sight post I sighted in POI=POA with one full rotation (up) on the rear sight. Load was a 405gr cast bullet pushed to 1500 fps.

With the Skinner Sights (front and rear) the group sizes improved slightly. Not as dramatically as with the 39A but I suspect that is my unfamiliarity with the new front sight (the 39A front sight did not require replacing). I am accustom to the bead on top of the front sight and the new sight is a simple post (which allows fine tuning by filing). I predict with some practice the groups will shrink even more.

Other notes. The supplied rear aperture is .096" I believe it is a good size for general field work. Small enough for some precision yet big enough for field of view.

Tim (Skinner) made me a smaller (~.065" I think, I don't have an accurate way to measure other than a drill bit) aperture for my 39 that I think is perfect for that rifle and might work well on the 1895 too. I have used it on targets and in the field for general plinking. I believe it would work well for hunting too. It sharpens the sight picture even more, which is a blessing for aging eyes and greatly reduces eyestrain. I will test it on my 1895GS too and may order a .050" for target work.

Bottom line, if your aging eyes are looking for a sighting system that looks good, improves your precision and allows you to avoid/delay putting optics on your levergun I believe the Skinner Sights to be an excellent option and a tremendous value.

I have NO association with Skinner Sights other than being a satisfied customer.

http://skinnersights.com/
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Old April 23, 2007, 11:19 AM   #388
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Quote:
I own a Dremel ...
Four words that send a shiver down my spine.
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Old April 23, 2007, 11:44 AM   #389
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JustsayMo: The Skinner Sights are very intriguing. Could you post a pic of your sights mounted on your rifle? Also, how does the sight picture look?
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Old April 23, 2007, 06:05 PM   #390
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Quote:
Quote:
I own a Dremel ...

Four words that send a shiver down my spine.
Yeah, I gotta agree with Sistema, Falcon: be careful with that thing.

I've mostly decided to just pay a smith to do touch ups. I'm a biologist, and biologist + gun + Dremel = trouble.

All: as I'm posting in other clubs, my lunch is being eaten again this week by not one, but two MAJOR projects at work, so will be unfortunately scarce here for a while longer. (Trust me, I'd MUCH rather be here.) Gad, what was I thinking ... clearly, I was not thinking when I took on both of these at the same time in addition to the regular workload.

Keep up the great conversation. I look forward to getting caught up, especially Mo's review on the skinners.

Nem
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Old April 23, 2007, 06:33 PM   #391
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Quote:
Gunsmiths: The custom work done on my 336C was by Mic McPherson. He does excellent work and I am very happy with the results. The work done on my rifle included shortening the barrel and mag tube, accuracy improvements (significant work), and slicking up the action. Here's a link to Mic's web site:

www.levergun.com
OK, so I took 20 minutes of slack time (hey, a guy's gotta have a break ...) to look at that site.

Z, is "slicking up the action" what he calls "action tuning" = "basic tuning"?
(Both terms are used by Mic, so I'm not sure if there's a distinction)

On his order form, I find the following (It's a little confusing).

Quote:
If Action Tuning & Stock Bedding is Desired (circle one only)
Part 1:
Marlin: $75 plus return shipping and insurance cost

A+B (basic tuning plus stock bedding)
Marlin: $150 plus return shipping and insurance cost
I'm guessing "A" must be just tuning, right?

And, is stock bedding worth it for a 336?

Last edited by Nematocyst; April 24, 2007 at 04:41 AM. Reason: typo
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Old April 24, 2007, 08:59 AM   #392
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Nem, I agree the options on Mic's page are a little confusing at first. It's also a good question as to whether stock bedding is "worth it" for a 336. I will tell you that the work performed on my 336C made a world of difference in how the gun shoots. Of course the shorter length makes it a very quick handling carbine, but it also seems much more solid -- perhaps even rigid now. Most of this is probably a result of the "through-bolt" modification to the rear stock. Other than the length and balance, the gun feels more like my 336XLR now. The XLR felt more solid right out of the box -- probably because of the laminate construction -- and was also more accurate than the 336C from the factory. Accuracy was probably also improved on the 336C by removing the forward barrel band and replacing it with a hanger-style connection.

All said and done, my two Marlins complement each other nicely. The XLR is an exceptionally well made rifle and really needed nothing done to it other than improving the sights. It is great for all kinds of weather because of the materials used. The barrel length means if I want to use LeverEvolution ammo it will take full advantage of the powder used in those cartridges.

The 336C was pretty decent out of the box, with good fit and finish and "okay" accuracy. But now it is a dream to handle and shoot, it just balances so nicely and the action is so smooth. Accuracy is almost on par with the XLR (not quite equal).

If you are at all interested in having Mic work on your 336, I suggest contacting him to discuss any questions or concerns you might have. He is easy to work with and answers email promptly in my experience.
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Old April 24, 2007, 10:16 AM   #393
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As far as the Dremel comment goes I can see the fear that would bring with it. Please allow me to assuage your anxiety with the fact that I have no desire to grind, or cut anything inside or outside of my nice new supposedly working firearm. I merely meant that a cloth buffing wheel with a small amount of jewelers rouge might polish a surface or two, and will certainly not be allowed to go near the sear or any part of the trigger mechanism. I don’t want to break anything. my main thought was the leading and trailing edges of the lever bar and the outer surface of the bolt. I am open to the possibility that I am wrong on even that simple idea, and will have to take it to someone eminently more qualified.
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Old April 24, 2007, 11:53 AM   #394
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Four Rules

Digital Falcon no offense to you or your skill with a Dremel Tool but.......
Are there four rules for Dremel tools used on guns? I mean hey watch where you point that thing!!!
Most of the time gun metal is soft enough to use simple hand files and jewelers rouge, the need for speed with a Dremel is apt to do more harm than good. Even a wire brush for detail stripping is questionable from my experience.
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Old April 24, 2007, 12:02 PM   #395
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Vang Comp normally works on shotguns, but they have a gent there who especially likes lever guns. https://www.vangcomp.com/Home.html

I'd never had any firearm apart as far as I'd taken the 336 when performing the mod's suggested on the websites in my previous post - except for the M16 & that was too many years ago to count. Didn't use a Dremel, although it would have made things easier & faster, but I did use a file, sharpening stone & sandpaper.

As far as I can see, the only thing you might do when polishing the action is to go too far & cause a feeding problem. None of the work is done on the bolt (well, maybe a little polishing), so the work should not cause any problems with the actual firing of the round. And if it turns out you've gone too far with the polishing, which isn't easy to do with hand tools, the parts aren't that expensive to replace. Checking your work as you go is always a good idea.

Working on the stock is a bit more than I can do right now, but I plan on trying my hand at it later. I'm kinda looking at a synthetic stock anyways

This seems to be one of the easiest firearms to work on. How ya gonna learn if ya don't try? Maybe some day you'll need to know the insides of this rifle intimately, like after the zombies come.
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Old April 24, 2007, 01:00 PM   #396
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Anyone seen or know if you can make a 336 into a straight stock?
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Old April 24, 2007, 05:01 PM   #397
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What do you mea by streight stock? Just no pistol grip? I have seen lever guns without a pistol type grip, I think even Marlins, is that what you mean?

Do you mean like this?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg streight stock.jpg (36.4 KB, 79 views)
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Old April 24, 2007, 05:22 PM   #398
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Quote:
Anyone seen or know if you can make a 336 into a straight stock?
Yes, it can be done and Marlin can help with the conversion. You might want to start with them, ask how much the stock set will cost and what services they offer in that regard. Personally, I think the pistol grip stock looks and handles great on a 336 -- but it's simply a preference thing.
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Old April 24, 2007, 07:37 PM   #399
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AWMP, this is what my straight stock 336 looked like.

http://www.grovestreet.com/jsp/onepic.jsp?id=1057734

Less common but they are out there. Mine was a 1960 vintage. Smoothest and best wood of any Marlin I've owned. Finnicky as heck about ammo though.

I traded it off to a guy that made me an offer I'd be stupid to refuse... The ubiquitous PG 336 is common and inexpensive enough I don't miss it (that much). I'm in the market for another 336 for a trunk/general purpose rifle as this thread has renewed my interest and appreciation for them.
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Old April 24, 2007, 08:47 PM   #400
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JUSTSAYMO
That is exactly what I am talking about. I have a marlin 1894c ported in 44mag with a straight stock (or no pistol grip, depending on your point of view). I really like the look and feel of the straight stock.
Looking at getting a 1894c or 1894 Cowboy in 20in in .357 MAG. Much cheaper to shoot.
Trying to decide which one, going to be my plinker, truck rifle and house rifle, Any input as to which one?
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