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Old November 23, 2014, 10:00 PM   #1
kcofohio
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Colt Trooper: Put Away Wet!

Just purchased a '64 build of the Colt Trooper 357. When I was checking it out at the LGS, it had good lockup and looked like few rounds had gone through it. But outwardly, it showed some pitting. So, going into this, I knew it wasn't a great deal, but it is a Trooper. Not that I'm a Colt fan, but it just seemed a part of history to me.

Got it home last week and pulled the Pachmayr grips off and found a good amount of pitting on the rear of the grip section.

As the title says, I don't think it was rode hard, but it was put away wet. At least the grips were wet. Probably why no original wood grips.

I broke it down to check the mechanisms. No rust or pitting to them, but rust was creeping into the cavity that houses them.

My one concern is that, though the cylinder bolt drops as should, per Coltfever.com, it pops up before getting to the cylinder notch lands. Will it last like that for a while?
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File Type: jpg Trooper1.jpg (43.3 KB, 68 views)
File Type: jpg Trooper5.jpg (50.1 KB, 81 views)
File Type: jpg Trooper9.jpg (54.8 KB, 90 views)
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Last edited by kcofohio; November 23, 2014 at 10:45 PM.
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Old November 23, 2014, 11:08 PM   #2
rcmodel
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I don't know what you mean by 'notch lands'?

But the bolt should pop up into the leading edge of the scallop leading up to each bolt cut.

If it doesn't the cylinder will outrun the bolt in fast DA fire and damage the bolt cuts by getting there too late to engage and stop it.

rc
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Old November 23, 2014, 11:10 PM   #3
Jim K
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That is pretty common on ex-police guns that were carried in open top holsters. It rains or snows, the grips get wet, and even if the gun is wiped down and oiled later, the wet grips hold moisture and the frame rusts.

Will that make any difference to the functioning or accuracy of the gun? I can't see how. As to when the bolt (cylinder stop) drops, ideally it should be into the leade (that triangle shaped cut) but no great harm if it drops early as long as there are no other problems. Trying to tune that Colt to correct the problem could make things worse.

Jim
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Old November 24, 2014, 03:20 AM   #4
Lucky Derby
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Jim K knows what he is talking about. Unless there are other problems, don't mess with it.
That Trooper should give many more years of service.
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Old November 24, 2014, 06:00 AM   #5
kcofohio
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rc, my bad on terms. Yes, the bolt pops up and hits the cylinder before it rotates to the scallop. So, the bolt definitely is up in time to stop the cylinder.

Jim, thanks, hadn't thought about that. Being holstered as a service piece makes sense. I wouldn't have it worked on unless it failed to drop the cylinder bolt properly. But reading some parts are short in supply is of concern.
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Old November 24, 2014, 09:09 PM   #6
dfariswheel
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The only real issue with the bolt dropping early and outside the leade in front of the locking notch is that you'll get finish wear on the outer diameter of the cylinder.

Rust under the grips has long been an issue even with stainless guns, and especially with rubber grips.
This is caused by sweat and other moisture leaking under the grips.
One good way to prevent rust is to apply a medium thick coat of Johnson's Paste Wax on the metal that's covered by the grips
Don't wipe the wax off, let dry 30 minutes then reinstall the grips.
The wax will seal the metal to moisture.
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Old November 25, 2014, 10:54 AM   #7
kcofohio
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Thanks dfariswheel! In a couple weeks I'll take the side plate off to make sure all the rust is gone. Then on goes the paste wax. Not on the internals of course.
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