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Old December 22, 2009, 09:52 PM   #26
Kurt99
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My dad recently bought an Omega3 at the local gun show its serial number 591 is this thing really as rare and valuable as it looks like it might be.I havent seen it but he says it was an extremely nice gun when it was new. You dont want to know what he paid for it

Last edited by Kurt99; December 22, 2009 at 10:17 PM.
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Old December 30, 2009, 01:29 PM   #27
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I came across this post while looking for an Omega for my son. That would be Homer Koon's Grandson. Just thought I would set a few of the details straight.

The Omega III was produced in Flower Mound Texas prior to Hi-Shear purchasing. The original 3 presentation rifles where given to John Wayne (actor), John Connolly (Governor) and Herb Klein (hunter). Note: Hi Shear is not involved and did not recieve one. The presentation was at the Kaufman ranch between Gainesville and Denton. These rifles were enlayed with gold and had a ruby in the stock. That is the reason that these 3 are worth so much. They were absolutely the most beautiful rifles you could ever see.

There was nothing wrong with the rifle produced in Texas (hence why I am looking for one). However, Hi-Shear moved the production to California after the sale. They were attempting to mass produce what really was a custom rifle. Though my father had been consulting with Hi-Shear after the sale, their own "experts" were in charge. They made a few poor choices and ended up with a bunch of worthless tooling.

There was never an effort to track down and recover the rifles made in Texas. Frankly, I'm not sure about the one's made by Hi-Shear either. Sounds like a pretty good story to up the price on a rifle. I'll have to look through the old write-ups later.

As far as the value... well it is worth as much as someone is willing to pay. These are/were very fine rifles. But keep in mind. Only 3 are really worth an obscene amount.
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Old December 30, 2009, 02:39 PM   #28
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Old December 31, 2009, 12:32 AM   #29
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first off, It is great to hear from a person of such history, anything you can tell us first hand is fab!!! Do you know how those 3 were marked, with the " S " in front of the serial number? Of the ones produced in Texas, do you know about how many there were?
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Old December 31, 2009, 02:30 PM   #30
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taliv, Thanks for the welcome.

rangerruck, Sorry, but I don't recall that detail. They might have had an S. There is however no mistaking one of the three presentation rifles. I am attempting to upload a picture. This is the presentation rifle. I had to play around with it to get the size down and that was after I gave up on doing an album. I would have posted the entire brochure if I could have done an album. Not sure whether the limit is per pic or all pics together.

The presentation were valued at ~17k new. New Omega III originally sold for ~$400.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Omega3_low002.jpg (974.0 KB, 366 views)
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Old December 31, 2009, 09:25 PM   #31
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WOW!!! My mouth actually started watering, when I began reading the words of the workmanship on these rifles... I would have to take any model I ran across, Texas model, even a hi shear model, if they got made.

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Old January 1, 2010, 12:04 AM   #32
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you think Duke would mine if I borrow his rifle for th rest of my life?
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Old March 1, 2010, 11:31 AM   #33
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excellent threads

my first time here but already I have found some excellent info especially on these rifles that have particular appeal.
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Old March 7, 2010, 08:02 PM   #34
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Kurt...
Was the show in Manchester, N.H. ? If so it may be one I sold as I Repped for Homer and sold many units. Port Clam Rake, Co. on Long Island was my best dealer customer.
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Old April 1, 2010, 11:34 PM   #35
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Nobody....as in not a single person or company concerned with liability buys back every one of their rifles if there wasnt a significant design or material failure. I am willing to bet that there is a high point of failure in the design that was known to the attorneys and accountants. Realizing this they recalled every single rifle, stopped production and closed down the shop until they could sell the patterns and designs to somebody that would work out the issues. Every single retrieved rifle was cut into small pieces......

In the mid 70's there was little anti gun reasons to worry about liability, there was HUGE product failure as this is where attorney's focused their attention





I spoke to Homer Koon in 1984 and he told me himself that the rifles he made in Flower Mound were rounded up using the order list he had. According to him all but nine were retrieved and their destruction was reported to the BATF at the time. There was NOTHING WRONG with these rifles, but with the THINKING of the people who backed him with cash to make it possible to have the production run he wanted.
There was an incident in 1970 involving an imported revolver, an RG 44mag, made in Germany. The owner HANDLOADED some shells to the MAX and blew part of his hand off. He sued the IMPORTER, and the anti gun judge sided with him and he won enough to put them out of business. This was the reason for the worry of a liability lawsuit that COULD run into the millions(a lot at the time).

Mr Koon said that when this happened, is pretty much smashed his dreams of firearms manufacturing and he felt betrayed. He also told me that there were some special presentation rifles made and each one got special numbers and special work. S1 was given to John Wayne, S2 to John Connally and S10 to a good friend of his that had backed him financially. I have seen S1 and S2 in museums and admired the gold inlays, etc. I have seen S10 and it looks like a regular production rifle except for the fact that is was never testfired, has a two tone red/blue finish, a silver grip cap with a gold "B" inlaid, and the special S serial number. I has a laminated stock and is chambered in .270 Win at the request of the recipient, who never fired it and let it sit in a gunsafe until his death in the early 1980's. I do not know who recieved S3-S9 or what happened to them, I would guess they were destroyed.

I saw a production Omega III in a gunshop in Kansas that was missing the bolt, but do not recall the serial other than is was three digit beginning with a 1, such as 189.

I see posts pop up on the web every few months about these rifles and every time, this SAME argument comes up...what are they worth? Who knows for sure, but I guarantee they are NOT going DOWN in value. I met a guy at a Dallas gun show who had three sitting on his table and calimed to have another at home and at teh time they were priced between $1000-2500, but none had the original scope and rings on them. From the production line, they came with Leupold VariX II scopes mounted with ConeTrol rings and bases. Other than S1-S2-S10, I have never seen an Omega III with the original scope and rings still on it, so that could also bear on the pricing.
Guns and Ammo magazine did a review on these rifles in 1970, then revived the story in 1984 and reviewed the test and said that most people have never heard of, musch less have seen one of these rifles. If you get a chance to check one out, do so.


If Homer Koons' son can search out the people who worked with Homer at the time, perhaps he can find more information, unless he was old enough to actually have been there at the time and can give us firsthand information.
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Old April 2, 2010, 05:18 PM   #36
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I really wasn't going to respond much more on this thread though I do get notices when someone posts (and those who send me private messages, I don't find out about those unless I log in or someone responds to this thread). This last post kinda inspired me to respond.

ltriker is obviously a fan of my father's and the Omega but seems to mix a bit a fact with a bit of fiction and some very illogical conclusions. And I'm not sure, but it might have been his post on gunbroker that I 1st found when looking for one of these rifles. I didn't save a copy of that post but what I recall was a feller selling a production Omega for an obscene amount and claiming there were only 9 in existence. There was the same story that they were all gathered and destroyed and he knew this first hand. It wasn't all bad as I did get back in contact with Bennett Grayson who was the son of a friend of my father. Bennett has also posted on this thread. Bennett had posted on that string that he had 4 of these so called 9 in existence, which is kinda a polite way to say you are full of it.

One of my first jobs (other than paper route and mowing yards) as a kid was cleaning up in the Omega plant in Flower Mound. So, I will not be an expert with intricate details, but you can't fly wild claims past me either. I'm not going to track down anyone though if there are folks that come across this I would love to hear from you. We might actually put together a book some day. Most of the folks I knew other than family members have passed. Anyway, let me debunk a few parts of this last post.

There was not a design flaw with the Omega's produced in Flower Mound. There was not a recall of production rifles and there are many (as in 800-1000) still out there. This is a lot less than say a Winchester Model 94 but quite a bit more than 9. Oh, investors/shareholders are interested in a return on their investment. Does buying back every bit of production sound like a good return? If there were ever a design flaw companies usually repair and refurbish, not destroy. And you don't have to cut it up into little bits. Just one cut through the receiver is all it takes to destroy a rifle by ATF standards. But this is what I recall from the replies on the gunbroker also. Not too many folks bought into that there were only 9 of these rifles left.

The Omega III was produced in the following calibers: 25/06, 0.270, 30/06, 7mm Rem Mag., 0.300 Win Mag, 0.338 Win Mag, and a 0.357 Norma Mag. The barrel length was either 22 or 24 inches. The stocks came in Claro Walnut in either a Monte Carlo, Classic or Thumbhole-Varminter style. I'm looking for a larger caliber preferably the 300 Win Mag.

With my father, there were 3 classes of each rifle he made. The 1st were the prototypes. These were the very 1st rifles. They were field tested and design changes made based on individual recommendations from the tests. These rifles (which were actually made in Denton Texas - not Flower Mound) were returned and destroyed. Then there were the presentation rifles. As I said there were 3 of these not 10. The one that I do not know what happened to was presented to Herb Klein. My guess would be it is still with his estate. Then there were the production rifles. These production rifles were produced and sold until the company was sold to Hi-Shear. As I said previously there are 800-1000 Omegas out there.

I did have a bit difficulty following the anti gun and the liability in the 70s. So, all I will say to this is that there is and has been an anti gun movement in this country for some time including in the 70s. And guns and lawyers don't mix. There are many lawsuits involving guns that have nothing to do with product liability. But that is what product liability insurance (which is expensive) is for. My father's company had product liability insurance.

My father was involved in some lawsuits. This could be a chapter in a book though I think most folks who read this forum are versed enough to recognize why lawsuits and gun manufacturers go hand in hand in this country. I do not know the story of the imported revolver. I do have many other stories including people shooting themselves in the foot or pulling the trigger after they stuck the muzzle in the mud. My father was not too keen on lawyers for this reason. But he couldn't have been too discouraged as he started 3 additional gun companies after Omega.

I will also clarify that the Omega had factory installation of either Leupold or Redfield scopes on Conetrol or Buehler mounts. My father leaned toward Leupold but it was really up to the buyer.

The one area that I will agree with Mr. ltriker is I think these rifles are worth between 1000-2500. Though I think I stated before that they are worth whatever someone is willing to pay.
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Old April 2, 2010, 06:34 PM   #37
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I've watched this thread as it's developed, it's very interesting to hear about the small shop craftsman in the trade. I've seen a few through the years that were out of small production shops. Very nice, and very good quality, rifles you can tell were built with pride.

I think a lot of us following this thread would like to see a few photos, if at all possible, of the real deal.

If it's not too much trouble. Thanks.
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Old April 3, 2010, 01:15 AM   #38
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to df koon and others who have contributed to this thread; I can't speak for others, but being a person who loves rifles, and history, and anything american history and all things americana, this is a fantastic thread, and if you wrote a book, you can count me down for at least 2 copies right now...
THANK YOU , THANK YOU , THANK YOU , df koon. really. Phil
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Old April 4, 2010, 03:10 PM   #39
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Thanks to everyone who has appreciated my input. It was certainly not my intention to take over the thread (I assume the original poster has sold his rifle and moved on). I'll try to put some pics together. Due to the size restrictions, I'll probably upload them to a site that I"ve seen other folks use on different forums. I've looked at the rules and this appears to be acceptable. If not please let me know. In the meantime, the following was sent to me by a friend who knows that I'm looking for an Omega. Just not the caliber that I'm looking for. Good pics though.

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=162833056

Also, I am very stongly leaning toward a book. This was Bennett's idea originally. I have alot of material and alot of memories and folks that were around are not getting any younger. I already have some ideas for chapters but would definately welcome additional input. I don't really see it as a big money maker, just another way of setting the record straight and documenting a man that I believe produced some very fine rifles.

btw, my name is Duncan Koon. I also go by dk and my father used to call me Ty (very few do anymore).
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Old April 4, 2010, 09:24 PM   #40
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that rifle appears to even have the correct rings/mounts that went with
the rifle; so awesome.
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Old April 14, 2010, 12:22 PM   #41
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Hi fellas, my first post here, signed up just to respond to this thread and add what little information I have on Omegas to the mix. My Dad (89 yr old Purple Heart Vet, born and raised in Denton,Tx) has an Omega III. I'm printing this thread for him to read.
We seem to have all the paper work except for the factory test target. Dads gun is a left handed .270 Classic model with Claro walnut stock, initial on the grip cap, ser# 568. Never been fired since it left the factory, and it didn't come with mounts, rings, or scope.
The brochure, owners instructions and invoice have Denton, Texas on them. The back of the brochure says "Firearm Development Inc." The invoice indicates the rifle was ordered in March 1971, shipped June 1973. In the space on the invoice that says "Shipped Via" are the typed initials HEK. The total including tax is $413.40.
I'll try to get some pictures of it and the brochure/manual up later and I'll ask my Dad what he remembers about buying it. Great info on these super scarce, beautifully crafted rifles. Thanks especially to "Ty" Koon for contributing his firsthand memories.

Last edited by genericusername; April 15, 2010 at 12:17 AM.
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Old April 20, 2010, 09:04 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfkoon View Post
Thanks to everyone who has appreciated my input. It was certainly not my intention to take over the thread (I assume the original poster has sold his rifle and moved on). I'll try to put some pics together. Due to the size restrictions, I'll probably upload them to a site that I"ve seen other folks use on different forums. I've looked at the rules and this appears to be acceptable. If not please let me know. In the meantime, the following was sent to me by a friend who knows that I'm looking for an Omega. Just not the caliber that I'm looking for. Good pics though.

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=162833056

Also, I am very stongly leaning toward a book. This was Bennett's idea originally. I have alot of material and alot of memories and folks that were around are not getting any younger. I already have some ideas for chapters but would definately welcome additional input. I don't really see it as a big money maker, just another way of setting the record straight and documenting a man that I believe produced some very fine rifles.

btw, my name is Duncan Koon. I also go by dk and my father used to call me Ty (very few do anymore).
Hello DK...

What caliber did you need? I can check my records and see if there may be a match. I have several original full color promotional flyers used for advertising. There is a left hand rifle and one with parkerized finish called "Hunter Finish". My personal rifle is.308 Win. Serial # P35. The interesting Serial # 666 can be located for anyone interested in making an offer. BTW I deal only in gold and silver coin.
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Old April 25, 2010, 05:55 PM   #43
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Hello DK...

In reading your previous posts I noted you mentioned the presentation location for Omega III Serial #1-#2-#3 and that is not what I remember. My wife and I attended the indoor (barn) Texas Barbecue at Rex Cauble's Quarter Horse Ranch in Denton,Texas. (which I understand was sold 10 or more years ago) I remember the Plate Glass displays on both sides of the entrance to the "barn" which had stainless steel corals for the horses. The beautiful tooled Bridles and saddles adorned with jewelry like silver which were behind the plate glass were remarkable. This is where the "Duke" was presented with the oak leaf and acorn carved stocked Omega III, serial number #1 which had his Brand in a gold insert in lower forearm. A Six millimeter Ruby encircled, in gold graced the right side of the butt stock. Serial #2 was presented to John Connolly, former Governor and Secretary of the Treasury and Serial #3 was presented to Herb Klein, a noted gun writer. After the Barbecue we returned to downtown Dallas where a Reception was held on the 35 floor of the City Club. This was one of the most elegant receptions my wife and I ever attended. The food was just great. I'll never forget the display of hand carved ice in the shape of large scallop shells which had shrimp hanging on the edge of the ice shell. This is where there was a reception line with the "Duke" greeting and chatting with all that attended.
This is a snapshot of my recollection of that great day.
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Old April 25, 2010, 06:52 PM   #44
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armlaw, you are 100% correct. The presentation was at the Rex Cauble ranch between Denton and Gainesville. I had thought Cauble actually lost his ranch much longer ago after he was convicted of drug smuggling. I used to drive past it regularly on my way to Gainesville and it went down hill a long time ago. Anyway, I'm very glad the day stands out in your mind.

Carl Kaufman owned the ranch in Menard that Alpha leased. It was actually one of two Menard ranches that I hunted when I was young. The other being the Henderson ranch, Max I think. Sorry for the mix-up.

I don't have a specific caliber that I'm looking for. Just a larger caliber than a 270. I would be happy with any of the magnums. I would like to be able to drop just about any North American game with it. Ever finding time is another story. I have a 284 Alpha that I'll pass down to my son too, so I kind of want the Omega to compliment it.

Your .308 is a very unique rifle. It is a prototype (as indication by the "P"). I don't think the 308 was part of the production run. That is definately a rifle you should hang on to.
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Old May 2, 2010, 11:22 PM   #45
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Smile Omega lll 25-06

I inherited a beautiful rifle from my grandfather, an Omega lll 25-06 with walnut (Turkish or French ?) stock, original Leupold scope and Conetrol mounts. I even have the original bill of sale and the owners manual!
I am enjoying reading about the history of this gun and the true craftsman behind it.
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Old May 10, 2010, 12:02 AM   #46
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Another proud owner

I think the previous post was right and there are probably many still floating around in collections. I have a 338WinMag that I tried to find info on several years ago and didn't have any luck but happened on this thread now. Anybody have an idea on what a "p" prefix means? Also were some rifles marked Firearm Development Corp, Denton Texas? I didn't see any mention of that
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Old May 10, 2010, 08:14 AM   #47
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Quote:
Anybody have an idea on what a "p" prefix means?
Look two posts up, it is a prototype.
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Old May 10, 2010, 10:00 AM   #48
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This is a great thread. I missed it the first time around and just now read it all. Thanks to everyone.

John
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Old July 29, 2010, 08:52 PM   #49
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i have a friend who has one.

its a presentation rifle with special serial number. it was made in 1970. its chambered in .270. never been shot, never been test fired- in absolutely mint condition, laminated stock and leupold scope. he wants 55k.

contact me if you know a buyer, or are seriously interested.
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Old August 1, 2010, 10:49 AM   #50
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This post is for DK or anyone else who might be interested I have found online a man claiming to be selling a rifle similar to the one described in this thread, he is located in Stephenville here in TX. Heres a link to the rifle.

http://texasguntrader.com/index.php?a=15&b=63754

-Bear
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