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Old October 16, 2014, 09:11 PM   #1
jrbaker90
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compound bow questions

I talked myself out of a longbow simply I didn't want to spend a lot of money on trying to build one and fail at it so I been looking at some used bow and I found a older Matthew solocam fx it looks good I think I am going to look at it again tomorrow they want 239 is that a good price and I want to see if I can make a offer on and I am not sure what would be a good offer thanks
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Old October 17, 2014, 01:21 AM   #2
gamestalker
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An older bow, any bow, is most definitely going to loose a bunch of value used. That said, I would personally bargain down to no more than $200, regardless of what bells and whistles it may have on it. But if it happens to not come with the necessary accessories, sights, rest, quiver, or the string needs replacing and such, I would not go higher than $100.

I got a 1 yr. old Marauder, which is a super nice speed bow, complete with everything imaginable including the case, he was asking $325, I paid $150. Just to give you some idea, the bow and with all the accessories was well over a $1K bow when new, probably closer to $1200.

GS
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Old October 17, 2014, 01:28 AM   #3
Bobson
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Like gs said, bows lose value ridiculously quickly. I'm not familiar with Matthews' full line. How old is this particular bow? If it's just a couple years, $239 is plenty fair, as Matthews makes great stuff. However, they also make fairly expensive bows, and at $239, I'd expect this particular bow to be AT LEAST five years old, and probably closer to seven or eight.

Given that likely age, I'd definitely want to test fire it before buying. Bows need proper maintenance and care when used. It could have a pretty wide variety of issues, from damaged, dry string, to cracked or fractured limbs, etc. And most of those kinds of issues are really difficult to find just by looking at it, even if you know what you're looking for.

Better yet. Make the SELLER test fire it. And stand back.
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Old October 17, 2014, 09:01 AM   #4
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Other things to consider.

Check to see if the bow fits you as far as draw lenght and poundage. Both can be changed, but some are not easy. It may need new cams, string, rest and the like. All cost you extra. Then there is also the chance that the bow has been dry fired which can fracture a limb. The damage might not show up immediately.

I would be very Leary of used bows and would probably throw another $150 or $200 into the pot and buy a new Mission.
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Old October 17, 2014, 10:00 AM   #5
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I have an older Drenalin LD which is a great bow.

The problem with older Matthews bows is that they are hard to customize for draw length. Rather than just changing pins on a cam you have to buy a completely different cam. Often those cams are both expensive and almost to entirely impossible to find. The older the bow, the worse the problem becomes.

So I'd echo the advice of others, make sure it fits you before you buy it.

I have a couple pals that moved to newer PSE bows that have a TON of adjustability and are not all that expensive and if I were to move to a different bow, I'd look very closely at a PSE these days.
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Old October 17, 2014, 10:31 AM   #6
tarosean
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Used Compound bows are like used cars... Their value drops like a rock... 239 is way to much for one that is possibly 14yrs old.

You can buy new bow's from just about all the manufactures for 350-400.. While they are not their top of the line offerings, they are more than likely leagues ahead of the one your looking at.



i.e.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Hunti...3Bcat103967280
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Old October 17, 2014, 10:45 AM   #7
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I just don't see a need to spend 300 to 400$ because I will never use it much because right now I am just I had a old golden I buy for 20$ and shoot the heck out it and I just want to get back to where I was with it. Their no way I could test fire it at this shop no place to thanks
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Old October 17, 2014, 01:30 PM   #8
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Have you considered a recurve? You could get a new Samick Sage, which is a really nice takedown bow, for $250. No bells and whistles to worry about or dump money into, and with practice, you could look forward to some very impressive (and perhaps more fulfilling), consistent accuracy.
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Old October 17, 2014, 02:19 PM   #9
typhun
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so i take it you wont be buying arrows for $400 a dozen either

Like others have said, draw length is number one on the list, the bow has to fit.

To get you close to the correct draw length the simplest method is to measure your arm span and divide by 2.5.

Last edited by typhun; October 17, 2014 at 02:25 PM.
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Old October 17, 2014, 03:08 PM   #10
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Archery technology has advanced so quickly in the past 20 years that compound bow designs become obsolete in a year or two. All of the good qualities of a top of the line $1000 plus bow from five years ago can be purchased in a brand new intro model today for under $300. The solocam was a big hit when introduced. It was fast and smooth shooting, but that was almost fifteen years ago. It is honestly worth around $100 bare. $240 is probably fair IF the seller is throwing in a dozen carbon arrows with broadheads, quiver, sights, rest, and a release.
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Old October 17, 2014, 06:22 PM   #11
jrbaker90
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I talked myself out of it for the reason I haven't shot in years and I wasn't that big into archery then so I don't want to spend alot of money and I never shoot it but one or two times I rather buy a 20 year old bow And shoot it for awhile and then go to a new one I am just wanting to shoot Some and if I like it more I get my a better one thanks
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Old October 17, 2014, 08:18 PM   #12
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compounds dont age like you would think.

the parts like strings dont like to last. sure i have a bow thats a decade old that still works, but i dont shoot it much if ever now.

the small parts like cams are very specific to the model year. normally a company stops making replacement cams after 2 model years. so yeah, youll never get a replacement. same for strings. strings degrade over time. and they dont make the same string for very long.
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Old October 17, 2014, 08:25 PM   #13
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If you are just trying to bring back instinctive or gap skills, don't be afraid of a used bow.

As long as the string is good (I would replace the string on ANY used bow) and there is no visible limb damage, a used compound can have many good years ahead of it.

As previously stated, bow technology has jumped ahead quickly in the last 20 years. However, old bows still shoot straight and will be great for target practice. I picked up an old-school (late 1980's) Bear Polar Bear II for $60 at a pawn shop with a case and 10 arrows. It shoots well, and if I wanted to hunt with it I have taken deer with the same model.

What you lose going to an older bow, mainly, is:
-Letoff. New bows take hardly any effort at all to keep at full draw. But even an old compound is better than even a 40# recurve for this.

-FPS. Another huge difference. Shooting at a range next to a shooter with a new ($1500) bow at 50 Yards. I released, then he released in that order. His arrow seemed to simply appear in the target, mine seemed to slowly meander to the target, and arrived perceptibly later.

-Sights. The new bows are set up for sights, and use them better because they shoot flatter. Old bows use no/old sights, which are not as good.

-Size. For the same power and draw length, the new bows are amazingly very small and light.

So if you are shooting at targets, and just want to get your skills back, don't be afraid to use old technology. If you don't use sights, so much the better. The fundamental skills are the same, and the fun factor is the same. A recurve would work well, but my 45# recurve wears my arms out much more quickly than a 65# compound.
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Old October 17, 2014, 09:23 PM   #14
jrbaker90
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I am actually looking at a polar 2 she just wants 50 and I think I can talk her down a bit. I really just to target shoot and in prove some I never could learn how to use sights and I would like to learn how I had a old golden eagle I paid 20 bucks for and I shot and shot it fair and if I Get as good. A friend of my has a pse nova extreme and he sell it to me for 75 he just got a newer one. Is the nova a youth bow?
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Old October 19, 2014, 12:58 AM   #15
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My daughter in law just bought a Bow Tech, Diamondback for like $300 and some change. It;s awesome, weight can be adjusted in just a couple minutes, and just about any draw length can be done in seconds to fit almost anyone. Those are a great entry level bow, and are very fine hunting bows, light weight, really short axle to axle, I like them a lot.

One more point to make, those bows like the Matthew your looking at are speed bows, and they don't hold up well without constant maintenance. Sadly, most just buy new bows every year or two, rather than dealing with finding parts, and the cost of maintenance.

Since you were initially interested in a long bow, and like others said, maybe find a good recurve for little. Put some sights on it and you'll enjoy years of shooting with nothing more than replacing a string now and then. And even though I'm a big fan of compounds, I love shooting my recurves.

GS
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Old October 19, 2014, 06:06 AM   #16
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Matthews bows are held in high esteem by archers across the planet. A good condition used model should serve your needs quite well, indeed. But I suggest take the bow to a Pro Shop for professional inspection before you buy.

TR
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Old October 19, 2014, 01:44 PM   #17
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I like a recurve but I am not sure if I could pull on back right now I never had a lot of strength in my arms and I hope to get back to shooting then I am going to look into a new recurve looked at the pse honor takedown and my neighbor that just past away had a recurve and if his widow still has it and his grandkids dont want it I would love to get it the last time I shot a bow was with him and I shot better with the recurve better then I ever did with my old compound
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Old October 19, 2014, 02:03 PM   #18
Bezoar
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delamination keeps the idea of something that old a bad idea. not fun to have that limb seperate on a shot.
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Old October 20, 2014, 07:27 PM   #19
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Well I got my buddy pse nova extreme and I shot it several and I did hit the hit for the first time in years and I think it was the first time with sights on a bow overall im quite happy thanka
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