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Old July 25, 2011, 06:20 AM   #701
Flintknapper
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Nimrod2 wrote:

Quote:
Ain't no Kryptonite in East Texas!
Dat True!


Quote:
Flint, you are starting to get me a little concerned. You seem to be insinuating that a new "super" pig is emerging in East Texas.
No...not super pigs (yet)...but they do seem to be adjusting to efforts made to exterminate them.

Quote:
Dare I even think that this new pig may be "Flint proof"?
Perish the thought! However...I concede that some of these pigs are certainly worthy adversaries.


Quote:
Now quit whining about the skeeters and go get that pig
Yeah...you're right, I guess I'm getting to be a bit of a Nancy now that I am almost 60.

I'll keep an eye on this hog, as soon as the wind is right for the stand I put up...I'll go have a crack at him.
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Old July 25, 2011, 07:43 AM   #702
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Well….the good news is the hog didn’t seem bothered by the Hog Light I set up and he stayed in the area for about 30 minutes last night.

Bad news is.... he continues to come in about 3-4 a.m. each time. Normally, when I get a hog (or group of hogs) interested in eating the corn (put out daily)…they almost always start coming in earlier to get it.

Not this guy! Oh well……..at least he’s “punctual”.




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Old July 25, 2011, 08:04 AM   #703
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Flintknapper - Perhaps you should do everything you can to leave scent, sign, etc. in the waterhole he is using and move him out of his comfort area so you have a chance to take him out in circumstances in which he isn't as comfortable or illusive.

Worst case might be the neighbors will inherit him for a while.
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Old July 25, 2011, 09:04 AM   #704
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Hi 308,

I am not against trying something unconventional when it comes to hunting hogs, but generally speaking "comfortable" is precisely what you want a hog to be. That's when they are most vulnerable.

I haven't yet attempted to kill this hog....been biding my time trying to get him to enter an area more favorable to me.

It is apparent...he's not going to "play nice" so I went ahead and set up a stand that allows me a view of the water hole he frequents. Its not ideal because the terrain slopes steeply down to the creek bed.

The reason that is bad...is that once the air temperature cools at night (read early morning), that cooler air settles and creates a thermal that flows right down to the area he is feeding in. That makes it hard to avoid being "scented". Good for him, bad for me.

If I can get him to come up out of the creek bed, then I can back off a hundred yards and better control the situation.

This dilemma would seem to support your suggested strategy, but it would force me to find the hog again and re-pattern him. If I only manage to move him off of my property, then regrettably, I have done my neighbor a disservice and there is really no point in us "swapping hogs".

This is a young boar...probably looking to establish some small amount of territory he can call his own. A larger more mature boar...would have already moved on...looking for sows.

Hopefully, I'll soon get a night where we have a Southerly wind, that will allow me to sit on the stand without much danger of being scented (unless he circles downwind before coming in).

We'll see. I don't get them ALL, but I get most of them.
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Old July 27, 2011, 09:28 PM   #705
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I am not a hunter, but this thread has made me more interested in hunting than anything I've ever read. Not because of the abundance of game, or the unending open season. But for the method being used by Flint. The study of the animals habits and the stalking of the animals based on these habits, the adaptation required when the animal changes it's habits, it all appeals to me on an intellectual level. It is a constantly changing challenge that requires some intelligence to win. Combine that with the fact that these animals are a plague on the local environment and it becomes a battle with a foe that is often underestimated. It really is a war against an alien invader.

Bravo Flintknapper.
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Old July 28, 2011, 12:58 PM   #706
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" It is a constantly changing challenge that requires some intelligence to win. Combine that with the fact that these animals are a plague on the local environment and it becomes a battle with a foe that is often underestimated. It really is a war against an alien invader."

I have been a hunter of other game for many years but I never understood the challenge of hog hunting until I read Flint's thread. He has really opened my eyes.
I am not alone. I read somewhere that hog hunting is one of the fastest growing sports- at least in the south. You know it is getting more popular when chain stores such as Academy start stocking items for nighttime hunting such as the LED lights with solar chargers.
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Old July 29, 2011, 08:19 AM   #707
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Wish me luck.........

Hog is slowly “backing up” the time at which he comes in (much earlier now), note the dates and times.

Pretty much on his normal schedule here:



About 3 hours earlier in this pic:



Less than 12 hrs. have passed since his previous visit.




If the date/time in the last two pics seem confusing (date the same)…here is the explanation:

The hog came in the night of the 27th but wasn’t photographed until just after midnight (making it the 28th), then… later that same day (night), he revisited the bait site a bit after 10:00 p.m.

Something between Ten to Twelve is much more to my liking! Though there is no guarantee that he will show up early tonight (or at ALL), I plan to go sit the stand until the hog shows up, my butt goes numb or the mosquitoes kill me.

With any luck (O.K. with a lot of luck), we will be rid of this guy soon. But, you never know with hogs….especially a lone boar. They are apt to do anything.

Anyway….. my next post will either contain pics of the deceased, or will begin with the famous quote: “The best laid plans of mice and men……..”
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Old July 29, 2011, 12:31 PM   #708
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How much does it weigh???????

A common question (usually resulting in a wild guess) concerns the weight of a hog. I am not sure why this is important to folks...except maybe a "heavy" hog is considered more of a trophy than a smaller one.

In my years of hog hunting...I have witnessed many folks estimate the weight of a hog much higher than what it would actually weigh if put on scales. Since it is not always convenient to have a set of scales with you, a "Heart Girth Measurement" system can be used to get pretty darn close.

Below is the formula for estimating the live weight (undressed) of Feral Hogs.

Also, I have put together a remedial chart (read left to right, then drop down a column and repeat).

Pig Heart Girth Weights

Heart girth is measured in inches using a cloth measuring tape. The tape is placed directly behind the front legs, wrapped snugly around the heart girth, and read directly behind the shoulders.

Pig Weight = 10.1709 x Heart girth (inches) minus 205.7492.

Found to be 95% accurate to within 10 lbs.

Using the above formula, we get the following:

25 inches= 49 lbs. 26 inches= 59 lbs. 27 inches= 69 lbs.
28 inches= 79 lbs. 29 inches= 89 lbs. 30 inches= 99 lbs.
31 inches = 110 lbs. 32 inches= 120 lbs. 33 inches= 130 lbs.
34 inches= 140 lbs. 35 inches= 150 lbs. 36 inches= 160 lbs.
37 inches= 171 lbs. 38 inches= 181 lbs. 39 inches= 191 lbs.
40 inches = 200 lbs. 42 inches = 220 lbs. 43 inches = 230 lbs.
44 inches = 240 lbs. 45 inches = 250 lbs. 46 inches = 260 lbs.
47 inches = 270 lbs. 48 inches = 280 lbs. 49 inches = 290 lbs.
50 inches = 300 lbs. 51 inches = 310 lbs. 52 inches= 325 lbs.

55 inches needed to get approximately 350 lbs.
60 inches needed to get approximately 400 lbs.


Another way to keep this formula handy is to store it (as a note) on your cell phone.


Then you can use the calculator function to "do the math" afield.


A cloth tape is easily taken afield and the Heart Girth measurement can be recorded (or remembered) for later comparison to the chart.
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Old July 29, 2011, 08:58 PM   #709
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We just use this. If they're over 550 lbs - we'll take them to the cotton gin and weigh them...
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Old July 30, 2011, 05:47 AM   #710
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DONE DEAL!

Pics and story later today. Have to get some sleep now.

------------------------------


Edit:

O.K. just a couple of “Quickies”……….




Last edited by Flintknapper; July 30, 2011 at 06:48 AM.
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Old July 30, 2011, 11:43 AM   #711
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Awesome! And the weight is...?
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Old July 30, 2011, 12:35 PM   #712
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290 even.
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Old July 30, 2011, 12:43 PM   #713
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Was doing a "Post Mortem" on the hog earlier today (also wanting to recover my bullet to check performance) and while I was at it...these two Coyote Pups came wandering out of the brush.

No doubt, they had smelled the hog and were looking for a meal. Both pups were pretty emaciated and one had been in a scuffle with something. It's wounds were fairly serious. The other pup looked fine (just thin).

I suspect something happened to the pups Mother before she could fully teach them to hunt on their own. Anyway...they were very much unafraid...but still kept about 25 feet between us. I hurried my chore and left.....so they could eat.

I have other pics (now) of the hog and can recite the events of the hunt if anyone is interested.

Coyote Pups:






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Old July 30, 2011, 01:13 PM   #714
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I respect that you only kill what you must and leave other critters alone. Too many folks just like to kill.
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Old July 30, 2011, 03:22 PM   #715
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Well done Flint. As to the pups I have heard that because of the drought many does are kicking their fawns out. Could this be happening with coyotes as well?
Keep up the good work.
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Old July 30, 2011, 04:59 PM   #716
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Quote:
and can recite the events of the hunt if anyone is interested.
I would like to hear the story when ever you get a minute to type it (I'm sure that everyone else would like to also).
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Old July 30, 2011, 11:42 PM   #717
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Decided that yesterday evening might be a good time to go and “sit” the hog stand I put along the creek bed.

The lay of the land (steep banks of creek) required that I put the stand almost parallel with the creek and only 40 yds. distance from the bait site.

As mentioned in a previous post…the location of the stand makes playing the wind (and thermals) critical. A late afternoon storm was brewing and along with it…South Easterly winds. Those conditions were advantageous on two accounts.


1. The wind direction would be blowing (slightly quartering) toward me….giving me the “downwind” advantage.

2. The cooler (than normal) air would help me reach my stand without working up a soaking sweat. I park about ¼ mile from the stand and walk in.


Got on stand about 7:30 p.m. roughly an hour before sunset. My hope was that the storm would quickly pass through (which it did) and the cooler temperature would encourage hogs to move earlier than normal.

While that may have been good strategy…. it didn’t play out that way in “real life”.


My last game-cam pics showed the hog had been coming in earlier each day (the last two sessions). I knew that by the time it got dark (after 9:00 p.m.) the storm would have passed and the winds settled, making conditions ideal.

I fully expected the hog to show up about 10 p.m. Figured I would take the shot and be back home before midnight. You know where this one is going….right?


I managed to make it to the stand without sweating, settled in and waited until dark before actually watching the area with any seriousness. I admit…..I was feeling a bit smug, the entire “set up” very much to my liking.


Not long after dark….the mosquitoes found me, how they do that so quickly is a mystery to me. Carbon Dioxide in your breath….I am told, but personally…I think they have perfected Social Networking because one mosquito turns into three and from there… their numbers grow exponentially. Anyway, they will take the smugness right out of you!



10 p.m. came and went, no hog. O.K. no big deal….its early and I still have a couple of pints of blood left.

12 midnight comes and goes, have enjoyed watching a raccoon eating the corn, but still no hog.

2 a.m. arrives and passes, no hog….but the mosquitoes have left.

3 a.m. and I am pretty sure I’ve become paralyzed from the waist down. Sitting in that hard seat has left my Gluteus Maximus and my legs mostly numb! BUT…….I think I see movement just beyond the hog light.


Sure enough…I can just make out the head of a hog slowly approaching the bait site. I turn on the lighted recticle on my scope, move my rifle up onto the rail on my stand and wait to see what the hog is going to do.


To my horror… the hog turns around and starts walking straight away (like it has decided not to come in after all), I find the hog in my scope and put the cross-hairs at the base of its tail. If this hog takes two more steps I am going to have to either let him go….or break him down and finish him with a quick follow up shot.


Thankfully….he turns around again and presents a shot quartering to me. I prefer broadside shots…but the whole reason I have a purpose built hog gun is so I can have shot angle options. The SOCOM (with proper bullets) will shoot through a hog stem to stern.

At the shot…the hog went down (CNS shot), he was dead before he hit the ground.


The movement was enough to trigger the game-cam and it recorded the event at precisely 3:00 a.m. (long night).



I immediately flipped on my white light, placed my laser on him and watched for movement…..but there was none.

I was able to pull the hog through the mud hole by hand…but had to use a rope and my truck to get him up out of the creek bed.



Took a Heart Girth measurement (have been comparing for accuracy), it was 49 inches (not able to hold the tape tight and take pic at same time)



Hoisted the hog on analog scale (see pic in previous post) and it closely matched the formula @ 290 lbs.



Hauled the hog off this morning….for “recycling” (Buzzards and Coyotes mostly).





This boar had a fairly thick “shield” at the point the bullet entered, (about 1-1/2” thick). Though nowhere near as thick as some I have seen…. it was tough nonetheless.




I won’t post pics of the wound channel or discuss bullet performance here…as I don’t think this thread is an appropriate venue for it. But…suffice to say, it was extensive.

But… no matter what you use, one thing to remember when hunting hogs is: Shot Placement is key!

Last edited by Flintknapper; July 31, 2011 at 01:36 AM.
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Old July 31, 2011, 01:34 AM   #718
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Flint,

If this thread isn't appropriate, perhaps we can start a new thread for posting of wound channel pics and discussions of bullet performance.
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Old July 31, 2011, 09:28 AM   #719
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That would be fine Countertop.

I certainly don't mean that the discussion itself is inappropriate (I know you understand that). After all...this is a Hunting thread and a certain amount of carnage is to be expected.

Just saying....this particular thread is aimed primarily at exchanging "tactics" and techniques for controlling Feral Hogs and there is no need for gratuitous blood and gore.

I am happy to talk about bullet placement, performance, etc...if someone wants to start a separate thread on the subject.

Thanks!

Flint.
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Old July 31, 2011, 10:27 AM   #720
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Wow... I wish I had your focus and discipline, Flintknapper.
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Old August 1, 2011, 05:48 PM   #721
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Still my favorite thread on this site. Entertaining and educational. I have to admit I'm throroughly impressed with how much work you've not only put into fighting this epidemic on your property, but also have taken the time to field questions to help others. I daresay that the lessons you're giving here may be directly related to many, many more hogs being nuetralized. Keep up the good work, and as always, shoot the long haired hogs first (the snow is still holding them off up here....for now)
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Old August 2, 2011, 04:40 AM   #722
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I don’t know if this subject has been discussed at any length before of not.

If so, Mods… please feel free to delete.

I have on more than one occasion ….heard folks refer to a Hogs skull as a steel vault of some sort.

Replete with many accounts of bullets failing to penetrate or “skipping off” the skull when frontal shots are taken.

I have no reason to question the accuracy of such accounts, but I don’t attribute these events to the thickness or toughness of a pig’s skull.

I believe the bulk of such happenstance can be explained by the angle at which the shot was taken (or how it ultimately impacted for any reason).

The following applies only to frontal shots. Ideally, we would like to have the projectile impact the skull as close to perpendicular as possible. See pic below.



The target area should be the Brain Pan which is located roughly from the middle of the eye socket…rearward to just short of the Crest of the skull (not a large target).



As angles become shallower…. the chances of deflection (or inadequate penetration) increase.



Even at the angle above…(though still good), some bullets (.22 rim-fire for example), can be redirected enough by hide and flesh … that they follow the slope of the skull instead of penetrating.

It often shows up as a “white mark or streak along the skull”. More than a few people have witnessed or experienced this.




“Worst Case Scenario” occurs when a pig lifts its head at the same time you press the trigger!



A shot that impacts at this angle has a high probability of glancing off the skull. It doesn’t mean you won’t kill the hog, but I’ve seen many hogs take a shot like that and just “shake it off”. Some will be knocked unconscious…only to get up a few seconds later.

But again, this is not because the Hogs skull is particularly hard or thick…most places, it just has to do with the shot angle. We have all seen how a bullet will skip off a body of water at shallow angles.

I think the best way to illustrate the anatomy of a hogs skull (Feral Hogs in this case) is to simply Transect and Bisect one and let you see for yourself. They are nothing like the “steel anvil” some folks claim!

See next post………
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Old August 2, 2011, 04:42 AM   #723
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Let’s start with the skull from a medium sized hog. I will transect it at several spots and show you how the skull is constructed (as viewed from the front).

When referring to any particular “area” I will use layman’s terms only (I.E. crest of skull instead of terms such as formed by the supraoccipital and parietal bones). We’ll just keep it simple.





The first cut was made from what would be the end of the snout to about midway up the nasal cavity:





As viewed from the front….you can readily see there are no thick bones in this part of the skull. In fact, this area is especially fragile in its skeletal make up and only has what strength it does…owing to the tough snout, hide and connective tissues.



Continued next post………

Last edited by Flintknapper; August 2, 2011 at 06:01 PM.
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Old August 2, 2011, 04:43 AM   #724
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The next cut was made just in front of the eye sockets. (compare to intact skull on the right).





This area gets into the Sinus Region and although there is more bone mass here, you would be hard pressed to find anything that was thicker than 3/16” (most about 1/8”). You will note that the majority of the hog’s skull is comprised of webbed/bridged openings and chambers.




Continued next post…………
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Old August 2, 2011, 04:44 AM   #725
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The last transected cut was made a bit behind the eye sockets and includes a point about midway into the length of the Brain Pan.





You can see in this frontal view…the Brain Pan (in the center) and the webbed areas over the B/P that help protect it.





Let’s take good close look here…because I want you to note, that while there is some “distance” from the outer skull…down to the B/P, none of the bone is particularly thick.




Continued next post……
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