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Old October 27, 2011, 06:03 PM   #876
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Old October 27, 2011, 07:53 PM   #877
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Flint, any experience with charging boar? In Alabama, I have seen plenty of boar charge over the years. Other guys in other areas say they've never seen it...
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Old October 27, 2011, 11:05 PM   #878
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DB,

That is an interesting subject. Yes, I have personally experienced “Charges” by both Boars and Sows but none were unprovoked. I have never actually been hit or cut by a hog, (but not because they weren’t trying).

As for regional differences, I have no explanation…..but I suspect if you were to ask detailed questions about the incident…you would find that many of these so-called charges/attacks were only bluffs by the animal or a simple matter of the animal escaping in close proximity to a person.

Now, I am NOT saying that hogs won’t make a very REAL attempt to hurt you sometimes, but IMO…it is almost always the result of a circumstance where the animal felt provoked (whether justified or not).

I use the term provoked in the broadest sense to mean: Moved to action (not exclusively by anger).

This would include an attack borne of fear, protection of their young or self.

Where I live (Deep East Texas)… we used to have what was called a Piney Woods Rooter. They had a reputation for being somewhat territorial (the Boars) and it would often be a toss-up as to who was going to give way when you met one in the woods.

But, PWR’s are few and far between around here now…and have been replaced by a Feral Hog that has learned to RUN (read survive).

Certain activities are apt to put you more at risk:

If you elect to hunt hogs using dogs then the potential for a hog to break loose and take a swipe at you or a dog is pretty good (and understandable).

Likewise…if you choose to enter a large pen type trap to “herd” the hogs into a trailer…please EXPECT to be charged.

Conversely, if I am just walking through the woods…scouting, I have virtually no expectation that a normal, healthy Feral Hog will do anything but run if we meet up. One possible exception…would be if I bumped a Sow off of her newly born litter (again understandable).

Any time we talk about hogs “Charging”….I think it necessary to make the distinction between a perceived “unprovoked” attack and one for which there is clearly a reason (I.E. wounded hog, sow with piglets, hog cornered, etc).

Otherwise….we perpetuate the false idea that hogs are fire breathing, armor clad, sabre toothed creatures… roaming the woods in search of their next victim.

In any case, IF you are charged by a hog (not captive…free to run), it will not be a protracted event. I have never witnessed an incident where the hog did anything other than “hit and run”….or make a pass at you (no contact) and continue on its way.

I do have a story about a rather large boar that put me up on the fence one night. I didn’t even know he was there until he “woofed” and came at me. Still scares me almost 20 years later.

That one almost got me, but we’ll save that for another reply, this one is long enough already.

Last edited by Flintknapper; October 28, 2011 at 10:37 PM.
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Old October 28, 2011, 01:13 AM   #879
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My experiences have always been when hunting/shooting hogs/boar. The charging male or sow was always in response to the death squeals/throws of the boar I just shot.

I have had several shot hogs charge when wounded, but that was rare - one or two times over the last 20 years.

On several occasions, I have had a boar charge, then divert into the heavy brush and then shadow me all the way out of the woods (several 100 yards) making his protests from cover - when I took out some of his brood.

We have a heavy strain of russian boar introduced into the area in Alabama where I hunt (thanks hunting camps!) and I wonder if that makes a difference?
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Old October 28, 2011, 02:08 AM   #880
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We have a heavy strain of russian boar introduced into the area in Alabama where I hunt (thanks hunting camps!) and I wonder if that makes a difference?
That is interesting. I hunt them in southeast Alabama, and our hogs have very little if any Russian traits. I didn't know that there were any Russian lines in Alabama.
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Old October 28, 2011, 02:22 AM   #881
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Originally Posted by 41 View Post
That is interesting. I hunt them in southeast Alabama, and our hogs have very little if any Russian traits. I didn't know that there were any Russian lines in Alabama.
Butler, Alabama - the local hunting lodges (3) introduced them to have something for clients to hunt when it wasn't deer or turkey season.

As a result, we get some really big boar in the area.
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Old October 28, 2011, 10:03 PM   #882
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I have been charged a few times but like Flint said it's always after I started the fight. With one exception the charging animal had been wounded and was well on it's way to being dead. ( I know, i know bad shot on my part ).
The odd exception to the rule is once a hog charged my small tractor that I was using to shred at the time. It came all the way in, rammed the front tire and then ran off. I can only guess that because of the noise of the tractor, and me frantically trying to get my legs out of reach, I didn't hear or see the piglets running in the opposite direction
Hope that helped muddy the waters some . no hogs are not fire breathers looking for a fight, but when you push them hard enough they will fight and if your not ready they will give you a run for your money!

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Old October 28, 2011, 10:40 PM   #883
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Flintknapper,

As always, I enjoy your posts. For over a year and a half now myself, and another officer, have been whacking hogs at our site but the population continues to thrive. The man that traps there pulls out anywhere from 4 to as many as 14 a week. They still continue to destroy acres each day. We've hardly put a dent in them. With the dry conditions and heat from summer, they slowed up a bit, but now with the cooler weather and the recent rain, they're all over the place! They are an amazing advisary to say the least.

Like your lighting setup. And your daughter is a credit to the young ladies that hunt, I salute her, not only for her shooting ability, but also as a hunter in the true nature of our sport (and her dad too!)

Look forward to the continuing saga of the hogs.....

Wade
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Old October 30, 2011, 11:52 PM   #884
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just got a little 60 pounder last night, and pulled the tenderloins off the skillet 20 minutes ago, mighty tasty!. I wish everyone know how tasty "free range" hog is, then Texas wouldn't have such a problem .

Flint, I seem to have several sounders coming up to my feeder at 6:45 exactly every night. in four days I have taken 3 hogs at the (only) feeder on my property. Groups are looking like 10-15 each, with work being slow, and having lots of extra time to sit in my stand they still come every night at 6:45, no matter how many were shot the day before.

I am thinking that I am running into several sounders at the same time and each group hasn't been accustomed to me yet, but sometime this week I would think each of the sounders would get used to me and change things up.

How many stands do you hunt and can you expect the hogs to be within range of a given stand at a given time? Or is there some amount of "educated guess", when I get a chance to hog hunt I have to drive an hour each way with sitting in the stand and gutting/Cleaning I would assume 4-5 hours each shot/kill. My time is precious and I want to make the most of my time, but I understand that I will not me productive each time. what Is most productive for you multiple stands and feeders or knowing ,really well, one group of hogs at a single feeder?

Once again thanks for your help and insight.
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Old October 31, 2011, 11:45 AM   #885
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Irondavy wrote:

Quote:
just got a little 60 pounder last night, and pulled the tenderloins off the skillet 20 minutes ago, mighty tasty!. I wish everyone know how tasty "free range" hog is, then Texas wouldn't have such a problem .
Well….not with the 60 pounders anyway.


Quote:
Flint, I seem to have several sounders coming up to my feeder at 6:45 exactly every night. in four days I have taken 3 hogs at the (only) feeder on my property. Groups are looking like 10-15 each, with work being slow, and having lots of extra time to sit in my stand they still come every night at 6:45, no matter how many were shot the day before.
You are probably right (more than one group of hogs), but if you look closely…you can easily verify your suspicions. Usually, groups of hogs will vary in a number of ways.

It might be the total number of animals, age structure or just the appearance (color, physical traits) of the animals. Look at your game-cam pics or make a mental note next time you are on stand, you’ll see the difference.


Quote:
I am thinking that I am running into several sounders at the same time and each group hasn't been accustomed to me yet, but sometime this week I would think each of the sounders would get used to me and change things up.
Yes, I would wager you are dealing with two or more groups and that individually…you have not (yet) put enough pressure on them to cause a change in their feeding habits.


Quote:
How many stands do you hunt and can you expect the hogs to be within range of a given stand at a given time?
Personally, I am prepared to be “mobile” when necessary, but normally we run 2 stands at each bait site in order to accommodate the prevailing winds. To answer your question of what to “expect” of hogs, I would say…it depends entirely on how much hunting pressure they’ve been exposed to.

Undisturbed hogs, (on good habitat) tend to be creatures of habit and can be amazingly consistent about when and where they show up.


Quote:
Or is there some amount of "educated guess", when I get a chance to hog hunt I have to drive an hour each way with sitting in the stand and gutting/Cleaning I would assume 4-5 hours each shot/kill. My time is precious and I want to make the most of my time, but I understand that I will not me productive each time.
Certainly…hog hunting (productive hunting anyway) involves knowing the habits of your quarry. Couple that with evidence gathered by means of Game-Cams, fresh sign, first hand encounters, etc…and you end up with what you aptly describe as an “educated guess”.

Since the time you have to hunt is limited….you will want to have the best Intel available. I have found no better method than the use of Game-Cameras.

They don’t ensure that you will see hogs whenever you go hunting, but they do provide invaluable insight as to what the hogs have been doing and the group structure (number of pigs and their age).


Quote:
What Is most productive for you multiple stands and feeders or knowing ,really well, one group of hogs at a single feeder?
There are advantages to both….but I would caution you to avoid applying what works for me (or someone else) to your situation…as they might be very different. Nonetheless…I will give you my thoughts on it.

You can work a single stand productively for quite a long time IF the following conditions are met:

1. You are careful not to overhunt the stand. I never hunt a stand more than twice a week or two consecutive days (if pigs have been shot at the previous day….or I have been busted).

2. The habitat/area you hunt is attractive to pigs and consistently holds them.

3. You are willing to hunt during the times of day (or night) the pigs are moving (in that area).

4. You adhere rigidly to NOT hunting the stand(s) when the wind is wrong.


Hunting from multiple stand sites can pay off as well….assuming they are far enough apart to attract a different group of hogs. There is really no sense in feeding the hogs twice….simply because you placed the stands too close together.

Even though the hogs may be in a different setting, if you don’t apply the same cautions listed above….you will have succeeded only in providing them an alternate place to feed.

They will happily slip out of the area (downwind) without you ever knowing they were there and go to the other feeder to eat.

On the other hand….multiple bait sites have the potential to attract other groups of hogs, which means you can more easily let one stand “rest” but still hunt. Also, stand sites in different areas can provide a certain advantage in terms of terrain features, wind direction, funnels or other condition that works in your favor, just depends on the property.

I don’t know your purpose for hunting the hogs (it might vary), or I would offer other suggestions.

If you are hunting occasionally and are not concerned with reducing their numbers, then simply do what is necessary to keep them relaxed and comfortable with the area. That way…you can selectively harvest the animal(s) you wish…from what is present.

If your main purpose is to reduce their numbers, then I would recommend that you remove the Lead Sow (Alpha animal) from the group each time you go out. It has the effect of “dumbing down” the herd each time you take out the leader.

That method has worked very well for both my Daughter and I and we have actually taken up to half the population of an entire sounder (over a few months) before they moved out of the area.

Quote:
Once again thanks for your help and insight.
Happy to help any way I can.

Best of luck on your hunts, be safe, have fun!

Flint.
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Old October 31, 2011, 05:15 PM   #886
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Quote:
Hunting from multiple stand sites can pay off as well….assuming they are far enough apart to attract a different group of hogs. There is really no sense in feeding the hogs twice….simply because you placed the stands too close together.
I hunt hogs, but not nearly as much as some of you guys. Therefore I don't know very much about there patterns. How far would two bait sites need to be apart, to target different groups of hogs. Would a few hundred yards be enough, or are we talking a mile or better?
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Old October 31, 2011, 06:14 PM   #887
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41,

The best thing to do is let terrain features or the hogs themselves dictate where to place additional stands (bait sites).

Feral hogs can…(and will) travel long distances in search of food. What we want to try to avoid is…making alternate food sources for the same hogs.

The obvious reason for that is: It leaves you guessing where they will be on any given day. Ideally, we want to manipulate their movement (to our advantage) as much as possible.

To that end….it is well to know the lay of the land and the “natural” travel patterns of the hogs. I know of some places in South Texas where having a stand just 300 yds. away might result in a new batch of pigs. Up in the pan-handle….a mile (or more) might not be enough.

As a rule…..I would expect to go ¼ to ½ mile (minimum) from one stand site to another. I am tempted to say “the farther… the better”, but that doesn’t always hold true.

I just let the hogs tell me where to put additional stands. Look for fresh sign, put up a camera to confirm a different group and BINGO…you’ve got a new spot.
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Old October 31, 2011, 09:13 PM   #888
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Quote:
I don’t know your purpose for hunting the hogs (it might vary)
I started shooting them for numbers and property damage reduction but have come to really enjoy the hunt. Also I have come to respect the adversary they are smarter than I gave them credit for, also the smaller ones are great in a pan with some butter, garlic, and rosemary!

Thanks for the advice, I am going to set up a stand on the far side of the hay field and see where that gets me, there are lots of trails leading to and from the field and my existing feeder. I am assuming they stop by my feeder at dusk (6:45 like clockwork) then head out to the field, to root around like crazy all night. Then they stop by my feeder on their way back to the heavy cover they like in the morning.

Depending on when I am there I think that I'll be able to catch them at the feeder morning and evening, and when I pick up a nice night scope I'll be able to pick them off in the field at night.

Thanks again
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Old November 2, 2011, 11:57 AM   #889
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I am retired military. Every morning when I get up, I sit with a cup of coffee while I navigate around the internet. This site is extremely interesting and I enjoy listening to a variety of opinions. I also learn alot. This particular thread on Feral Hog hunting has been extremely interesting and exciting. I enjoy following the adventures of Flintknapper as he deals with his Feral Hog adversaries. I click on this thread everyday to see if there is an update to this serial and ongoing adventure.

Since I do not move around very much any more, I share this adventure through this thread.

Thanks for getting me involved.

With kind regards,

Ed
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Old November 2, 2011, 12:48 PM   #890
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VOD/Ed,

First, let me say Thank You for your service Sir!

Though not the intended purpose of this thread, if you get to live vicariously through it then I am happy for that.

I am about to spend more of my time Deer Hunting (season opens this weekend) than with Feral Hog Control....but I will continue to pursue them as the need arises.

Perhaps after Deer Season...I will find a certain Hog and dedicate it to you.

Again, my deep appreciation for your service to our Country.

Flint.

Last edited by Flintknapper; November 2, 2011 at 03:01 PM.
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Old November 2, 2011, 01:09 PM   #891
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From my experience, the more european (russian as most people call 'em) blood a boar has, the more likely he is to run from you, and the faster he will be at it.

When you start approaching 50/50 feral/European mix is when they start getting unpredictable. They get the some wildness from the european side, and a lack of the natural fear of man from the domestic side. These are the fighters, and the ones that will give you trouble - in my experience at least.

Also on a general note, hogs are so damn smart. Way smarter than whitetails. Like has been said in this thread, if you want to be successful at it, you have to be flexible. If you hit them a couple times at dark, they will come in the morning. If you hit them in the morning then, they will come in at 2AM. You have to constantly adjust your tactics to stay on them. It is fun challenge.

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Old November 2, 2011, 07:14 PM   #892
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Quote:
Also on a general note, hogs are so damn smart. Way smarter than whitetails.
I always find the notion of considering hogs as being "smart" to be a bit silly. "Smart" seems to mean that the animal doesn't walk out of the woods with a target painted on its side and present itself broadside to the hunter while he jacks around trying to get his gun on target.

Hogs are not as smart as chimpanzees and the IQ level of chimps is in the 35-49 range which is considered to be moderately retarded by human standards. So at best, hogs would fall into the severely retarded category with an IQ below 35.

I think we often confuse being skiddish or timid to being a sign of being very smart and that isn't necessarily the case. Most have a very well developed sense of self preservation but it doesn't require a high level of intelligence to take flight when you discover something in your surroundings that you don't understand or that you recognize as being bad.

http://www.paulcooijmans.com/intelli...iq_ranges.html
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Old November 2, 2011, 07:35 PM   #893
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Quote:
I always find the notion of considering hogs as being "smart" to be a bit silly. "Smart" seems to mean that the animal doesn't walk out of the woods with a target painted on its side and present itself broadside to the hunter while he jacks around trying to get his gun on target.

Hogs are not as smart as chimpanzees and the IQ level of chimps is in the 35-49 range which is considered to be moderately retarded by human standards. So at best, hogs would fall into the severely retarded category with an IQ below 35.

I think we often confuse being skiddish or timid to being a sign of being very smart and that isn't necessarily the case. Most have a very well developed sense of self preservation but it doesn't require a high level of intelligence to take flight when you discover something in your surroundings that you don't understand or that you recognize as being bad.
Adaptability, Intelligence, Instinct, or Smart, whatever you wish to call it, they are harder to hunt than a lot of big game and vastly more intelligent. For a sub-human species they have a great intellect and I would consider them smarter than a LOT of humans I know! They figure your plans and tactics out and vary theirs accordingly. I call that SMART.
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Old November 2, 2011, 09:17 PM   #894
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DNS wrote:

Quote:
I always find the notion of considering hogs as being "smart" to be a bit silly. "Smart" seems to mean that the animal doesn't walk out of the woods with a target painted on its side and present itself broadside to the hunter while he jacks around trying to get his gun on target.
No, I don’t think that is what is being proposed at all. It’s a clever and witty quip (made me laugh actually ) but a far cry from what most folks are trying to relate.

Quote:
Hogs are not as smart as chimpanzees and the IQ level of chimps is in the 35-49 range which is considered to be moderately retarded by human standards. So at best, hogs would fall into the severely retarded category with an IQ below 35.
Probably an accurate analysis…but it goes awry when you try to apply human standards to animals (I.E. intelligence quotients). There are folks willing to Anthropomorphize feral hogs (and other animals), but they are few in number and I have encountered none here.

No one is suggesting that Feral Hogs are capable of Abstract Thought or Analytic Thinking, but they certainly make “Associations” much quicker than most animals (that we hunt).

It is precisely that ability that earns them the reputation of being “smart” even if that is semantically incorrect.


Quote:
I think we often confuse being skiddish or timid to being a sign of being very smart and that isn't necessarily the case.
True, this is a thoughtful and valid point. Some animals simply react on “instinct”, meaning:

An innate behavior or inherent inclination toward a particular behavior/response.


Quote:
Most have a very well developed sense of self preservation but it doesn't require a high level of intelligence to take flight when you discover something in your surroundings that you don't understand or that you recognize as being bad.
Self-Preservation (absent instinct) is a sign in itself of reasonable intelligence.

By default… it requires Self Awareness (recognition of being an individual) and of life itself. These are both things the animal seeks to “preserve”.

Some are better at it than others…and those capable of learning from their experiences (or from the “cues” of others) will quite naturally adjust/modify their behavior to their best advantage.

I believe Feral Hogs do this very well… and my experience hunting them for the last 25 yrs. would seem to support that idea. Most places, they are markedly more difficult to find and kill now…than 15-20 years ago.

We can argue as to whether or not hogs are getting smartER (I believe not), or just reacting to new stimulus (hunting pressure and tactics).

I hold the latter to be the case, but their overall intelligence should be neither underestimated nor embellished.
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Old November 2, 2011, 10:14 PM   #895
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Quote:
I hold the latter to be the case, but their overall intelligence should be neither underestimated nor embellished.
Right, and so the idea of being "smart" really just seems to come down to my initial assessment that they don't come out with a target painted on them and turn broadside to be shot by a hunter. We think they are so smart because they aren't easily manipulated repeatedly by us using some blatantly simple methods. Sure, they learn to recognize traps that that puts them ahead of many animals, but I don't see too many trappers going out of their way to actually hide their traps. They set big old clunky metal traps and catch a few pigs and then cuss at the fact that the other pigs don't go in the trap and write it off as being "smart" pigs when the level of smarts is above the hunter's or trapper's level of endeavor.

Sure, pigs are smarter than deer, sheep, cattle, and most chickens, but those are very low standards by which to proclaim an animal as being "smart."
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Old November 2, 2011, 10:15 PM   #896
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Hogs are not as smart as chimpanzees and the IQ level of chimps is in the 35-49 range which is considered to be moderately retarded by human standards. So at best, hogs would fall into the severely retarded category with an IQ below 35.
How the HELL do you give a hog or a chimp an IQ test. I mean, especially hogs, they have cloven hooves. How are they going to even hold a pen to take the friggin' test????? Oral test, perhaps? Do any humans speak hog?
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Old November 2, 2011, 10:25 PM   #897
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Quote:
Do any humans speak hog?
This is begging for an ex-wife joke.
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Old November 2, 2011, 10:27 PM   #898
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Well Double Naught, I think it is safe to say we mean smart when compared appropriately to other animals. Not smart when compared to stephen hawking. They have a highly developed intelligence when applied to staying alive, as compared to other animals hunted for game. I think that is primarily what we are getting at.

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Old November 3, 2011, 02:39 AM   #899
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I skimmed/read thru this entire thread in the last couple days.
Dang, never knew hogs were so destructive.

Flint, I admire your dedication that seems almost pointless. Kill one hog to be replaced by 3
As much as I enjoy pork, I'm sure that I would get tired of eating it quick enough

Oh yea. I'm not a fan of the black guns, I prefer the good 'ol woodies, however I admire your SOCOM. something about it makes it better than the others. maybe 'cause its named,... Hog Hammer... gotta love it
Ever thought about putting a "kill count notch" on your rifle. not a actual notch but something like a paint mark. 'course by now you will need to use roman numerals or perhaps scientific numbers for the kills. I can see it now 95.253x10^23 kills
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Old November 3, 2011, 02:40 AM   #900
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Hi Flintknapper
Not sure if my last message got through ,It was a big thank you for the info re the batwing doors on the trap
Never seen anything like that here in Western Australia, great design
Thanks a heap mate
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