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Old December 29, 2011, 07:08 PM   #1001
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Yes suppressors are legal in my State (Texas)...in fact just about anything short of poisoning them or blowing them up is legal.
How about remote controlled shotguns?

Set up a "wi-fry" network (google wi-fry) and point and click your way to lots of bacon!
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Old December 29, 2011, 07:09 PM   #1002
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ROFL!

If it does, it will solve the mystery of where they come from...and you'll know better than to leave hog parts lying about.
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Old December 29, 2011, 10:02 PM   #1003
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This thread is amazing.
I live near Green Bay, and a neighbor recently got a wild hog sniffing around his domestic pig stock. Mohawk and everything.
What are the chances that they could thrive this far north?
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Old December 29, 2011, 10:37 PM   #1004
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I'd say pretty good. This map shows there are some just north of you on the Upper Peninsula. Here is some more info from WDNR
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Old December 29, 2011, 11:33 PM   #1005
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Great...so those deer prints that were "a little off" were probably hog. Time to declare war.
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Old December 29, 2011, 11:58 PM   #1006
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^^^^^^^^

Could be Pastor. Hog tracks are indeed different than that of a deer, but if you are not familiar with the differences...it might not be the best indicator to use afield.

There are even subtle differences between the front and rear hooves.

Front:


Rear:



I would also look for scat, sign of rooting and if the area you were in has barbed wire fencing...you will almost always find hair caught on the bottom strand where they cross under it.



Check around water sources as well... for tracks and wallows.
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Old December 30, 2011, 12:35 AM   #1007
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fresh wallows around my tank/pond are the #1 easy to find sign that the hogs are back in my area. no matter the outside temp they seem to go straight for the mud, then to the feeder. And yes it is time to declare war! My 30.06 isn't loud enough and my 30-30 lever can't shoot fast enough to scare or kill them all off.

I took some of Flint's advice this summer and started killing off the lead sow or dominant male when I couldn't take the meat (to hot or bad timing) and without fail a sounder without a wise old leader would stick around the feeder a little to long or go right back to the feeder after another pig was shot. "Uh Fred you gonna eat that? No, well don't mind if i kinda horn in a bit" BANG! second shot of the night.

Also Flints advice of waiting for then to line up is solid, many times 2 or more heads will line up under the feeder creating a really great 2+kill per bullet ratio.

Thanks again Flint for all the advice and this very informative thread.

ID
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Old December 30, 2011, 12:40 AM   #1008
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I'll do a walk about in the morning and keep my eyes peeled. Thanks for the tips.
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Old December 31, 2011, 12:02 PM   #1009
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Pastor, I can offer some general information in regards to your question posted in the link/thread below:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=634009

As already noted in that thread…Hog “Scat” can and will vary greatly in appearance depending upon what has been consumed. As you know…..Feral hogs are omnivorous, (meaning they eat both animal and plant matter).

Naturally, a higher percentage of one matter over the other will dictate the composition of the droppings. Feral Hogs are also opportunistic feeders, eating anything they find palatable…. to supplement their seasonal intake.

Because their diet is so diverse…it is difficult to point to droppings alone as “proof” of the animals presence. However, in conjunction with tracks, wallows or other sign….”droppings” can be another indication of hogs.

Where I live…Feral Hogs eat a good amount of roots, grasses, forbs , tubers and mushrooms. It does not make up the entirety of their diet…but generally results in a fibrous looking dropping….most often round and somewhat segmented.

They can vary in diameter from about ¾” to over 2”. Larger hogs leave bigger scat.




The appearance of fresh scat versus old scat is readily apparent…and requires no discussion.

Fresh:


Old:


Continued next post……….
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Old December 31, 2011, 12:04 PM   #1010
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Just to demonstrate how tricky identifying scat can be, the photos below are of the same droppings….but one day apart!

In this case… the hogs had been feeding on Nutgrass (sedge) and the resulting scat had a lot of water content and was fairly loose.



A person examining this scat (a day later than above)….would have a hard time attributing it to a hog.



Continued next post………………..
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Old December 31, 2011, 12:06 PM   #1011
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While we are on the subject of Nutgrass/Sedge, it is a favored food of Feral Hogs and grows in abundance in many areas where hogs live. There are different varieties of it…but here are a few pics of what you might look for.




This is what the “head” of the plant can look like. It is eaten as well as the tuber.




If in doubt, the stem of nutgrass/sedge…will have a roughly triangular shape to it.




The “tuber/nutule/bulb/root” is what the hogs are primarily after, BUT they will eat the head of the plant too.



Continued next post……….

Last edited by Flintknapper; December 31, 2011 at 08:33 PM.
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Old December 31, 2011, 12:08 PM   #1012
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Another thing hogs are fond of….are the tender roots/shoots of grasses.

In areas where you have cattle, they often times overturn the “Cow-Pies” not in search of insects (as is most commonly stated), but to get the moist, tender shoots of grass.



Grubs, insects, larvae, worms, mice, etc….are more often found under logs, rocks and leaves.



The grubs in the pic above were found under a piece of firewood. I had cut a log into 20” lengths and stood them on end to split at a later date. A few weeks later…I noticed that hogs had knocked most them over.

Curious….I turned over a few myself and discovered what they had been after. Nearly every piece of wood had 3 or more grubs under it…in addition to earth worms. A good protein return for the energy expended to find it.

Pastor, I will post some pics of hog tracks later today and make a few general statements about them.

Others are invited to submit their own pictures and comment as well.

Flint.
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Old December 31, 2011, 04:24 PM   #1013
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When comparing hog tracks to Deer Tracks the difference would be clear IF one were right beside the other and both were representative of what you normally find.

Pictured below is a Deer Track, note the aspect ratio ( a good bit longer than it is wide), fairly sharp tips and less “pad” present. This track did not display the dew claw marks…sometimes present.



Contrast that with a Hog track (not too much longer than it is wide) and usually has a more rounded tip.



Another example:



Most hog tracks are not very large (hogs have relatively small hooves for their body size), but if you see a set like the ones below, you may be assured they belong to a hog that will get your attention.



Finally, it has been mentioned that the stride of Feral Hog is not conducive to having the rear hoof imprint upon the front, but this depends. I will concede that a mature hog (walking) will most often leave separate prints.

But smaller hogs commonly leave overlapping tracks and also hogs that are trotting (any size) will do the same thing.



Another thing of note…is that the hoof of a hog is not always as rounded at the tip as some might think. The older the hog…the more likely the hoof will be rounded….but I use Aspect Ratio as a diagnostic tool rather than simple “roundness”.

An older deer can have hooves that are worn down (and if cattle are present)….a small calf will make a vaguely similar track.

After you’ve seen a few tracks….you’ll be able to distinguish most of them from that of other animals.

One thing that can throw you though…is a “Mule Footed” hog. They are rare most places…and the track will leave you scratching your head. I believe “Double Naught Spy” on the forum here, killed one recently.

The porcine equivalent of a four leafed clover.

Last edited by Flintknapper; December 31, 2011 at 08:38 PM.
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Old December 31, 2011, 05:12 PM   #1014
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Great explanation Flint,
I can pretty much tell you at a glance whether it is deer or hog explaining it to another in writing is not so easily done.
As for the hog with the missing foot I'm in the snare camp as well. Cutting off circulation and atrophy is about all I can think of to explain such a clean and strait cut. Snares are my primary nocturnal hunting method. On occasion I've caught them by the foot instead of the neck. Also have had them break a cable on occasion but not a hog that small I use 3/32 cables and attach to a smallish flexible tree so it gives too much to break easily. Only broken cables were attached to a solid anchor point where there was nothing else around. May have been a smaller snare set for furbearers that finally broke.
I like you kill all I can and commonly set 3 dozen snares a nite as well as stand hunting them. The hogs in my area are quite trap shy so shooting and snaring are my only real weapons in the fight. I am in the process of designing a leghold type trap for them but still must come up with a way to keep the deer safe what few are left any way.
Thanks once again for the entertaining and informative thread keep us posted.
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Old December 31, 2011, 05:29 PM   #1015
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Flint

In the pic of the large hog prints in the mud with your binos are those dew claw marks at the back of each print? I am assuming that normally they dew claws don't leave marks but because of the deeper mud the dews did mark.

I was confused a few weeks ago by some similar marks i found. We had a lot of rain and then I started seeing the dew marks pop up. Being a newish hunter/tracker the only dew marks I had seen were from a large buck that had wandered through never seen it from a hog. I thought the big buck might be back but the prints weren't quite right.

ID
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Old December 31, 2011, 05:46 PM   #1016
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i hunt in victoria area, and hunt on cattle grazing area.

the pigs will go after the wild onions, and wrecks shop. next time i go out there, ill take some pics of the onions.
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Old December 31, 2011, 06:19 PM   #1017
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Dr Tad Hussen It would be OK if they stayed on your ground!! But they will go where they want when they want. Your next door Friend would be your next door # 1 enemy
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:17 PM   #1018
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this thread has taken me at least 12 hours over two days. it has been some of the best hours of my life. sorry for your misfortune but this is an amazing thread.
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:25 PM   #1019
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My wife wants to know why I'm looking at pictures of poop on new years eve...
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:45 PM   #1020
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^^^^^^^^^

I'd have to say...its a reasonable question.

Mine...wants to know why I posted them.
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:48 PM   #1021
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To remind yourself how crappy 2011 was?
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:50 PM   #1022
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Flint, or anybody else, please explain what a 'wallow' is.

Thank you.
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Old December 31, 2011, 10:03 PM   #1023
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Twmaster, a wallow is where a hog, Elk, some other animals as well, will find a mud hole and literally wallow around in it to cool off as well as coat their bodies with mud to help get a small bit of relief from biting flies and other insects.
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Old December 31, 2011, 11:11 PM   #1024
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^^^^^ yup thats it. I usually find them at the edge of a tank or along the road in the ditch, anywhere that is muddy. As my tank dried out over this long hot summer the wallows would move down the banks. It created a kind of sad timeline of the miserable summer.

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Old December 31, 2011, 11:37 PM   #1025
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TW, as Freedom Fighter aptly described a "wallow" is indeed nothing more than a muddy/watery spot that animals lay down and roll in.

When used by hogs...the purpose can vary with the time of year. In the hot months..the mud provides a cool place to lay for awhile...(but also has other benefits).

In the cold/winter months...hogs continue to use wallows but less frequently.

A covering of mud benefits a hog in several ways (some already mentioned).

1. The hog might cool itself in both water and mud.

2. A layer of mud protects the animal against biting insects (mosquito's, deer flies, horse flies, etc).

3. The layer of mud traps small parasites (primarily fleas, hog lice and soft ticks) which are then removed when the hog rubs on a tree, fence post, rock/other.

4. The mud is soothing to skin ravaged by Mange Mites.

5. The mud also helps remove old loose hair....thus grooming the hog to some degree.

I'm sure there are other lesser benefits ...but suffice to say..in the case of pigs, wallowing is an important part of their health structure.
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