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Old April 15, 2015, 05:51 PM   #1
NMRevolverGuy
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Extreme difficult in reassembling 1851

So, I disassembled my new Uberti 1851 today, and found that removal of the barrel assembly was very difficult. To the point that it required aaplication of a rubber mallet. Once I got it pulled down and clean, I am finding myself entirely unable to get the barrel assembly to budge that last fraction on an inch and settle completely against the frame. Is this a common problem? Is there a common solution? All videos I've looked up on reassembly seem to show it clicking on with a fair amount of ease.
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Old April 15, 2015, 06:13 PM   #2
Tommygunn
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Try carefully aligning the barrel, then use the mallet and tap it down.
New Colt type revolvers are often tight....your problem is not unique.
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Old April 15, 2015, 06:42 PM   #3
expat_alaska
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Well, I'm No Expert, But...

Quote:
So, I disassembled my new Uberti 1851 today, and found that removal of the barrel assembly was very difficult. To the point that it required application of a rubber mallet. Once I got it pulled down and clean, I am finding myself entirely unable to get the barrel assembly to budge that last fraction on an inch and settle completely against the frame.
I have 4 month-old 2014 [CM] Pietta 1851 Navy steel .36. I am wondering how you may have disassembled it.

Prior to my purchase, my info was thus: remove the wedge, move the hammer to half-cock, unlimber the load lever and use it (as if to load ball) on the cylinder between chambers to leverage the barrel away from the frame.

Easy-squeezy.

Maybe your use of the rubber mallet may have bent the barrel/frame alignment pins at the bottom-front of the frame.

If so, you may have to do some reverse re-aligning with same mallet to the side of the barrel that is protruding from the frame when installed as far as it will go.

Disclaimer: I am not a gunsmith, except at my private workbench.



I dunno what you did, and I don't have a Uberti, but they are good guns.
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Old April 15, 2015, 06:48 PM   #4
NMRevolverGuy
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I disassembled exactly as you described, but the assembly was on there so tight that is was less easy-squeezy and more cussy-whacky and so I tapped at the loading lever with the mallet. This I did on the advice from the guy at Uberti customer service. Unfortunately, I don't have the advantage of leverage when putting the thing back together :/
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Old April 15, 2015, 07:34 PM   #5
Crawdad1
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Like Tommygunn said above no big deal. I put some grease on the end of the arbor turn the revolver up and tap with a mallet while keeping and eye on the alignment of the pins. I had a lot of revolvers that were tight like that and over time they'll loosen up.
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Old April 15, 2015, 07:35 PM   #6
expat_alaska
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Quote:
Unfortunately, I don't have the advantage of leverage when putting the thing back together.
I don't know what to say to that other than send it back to the seller. IMO, I think it would be rather hard to send it back to Uberti.

Gee whiz, I sincerely wish you luck!

Quote:
Like Tommygunn said above no big deal. I put some grease on the end of the arbor turn the revolver up and tap with a mallet while keeping and eye on the alignment of the pins. I had a lot of revolvers that were tight like that and over time they'll loosen up.
IMO, it's not "not" a big deal if the OP had to use a rubber mallet to disassemble the pistol. I don't have a Uberti but they have a good rep except that Uberti arbors have a rep for being short, unlike Pietta. If it is a Uberti, most have a short arbor, so that is not the problem. Maybe a bent arbor? Not impossible. Maybe it was a Monday or Friday assembly. Lots to be said for that.

Jim

Last edited by expat_alaska; April 15, 2015 at 07:47 PM.
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Old April 15, 2015, 07:41 PM   #7
Crawdad1
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But sometimes, however, you really have to tap.

I always put a piece of wood over the muzzle end on the barrel to protect it regardless of how hard I'm tapping. And I've had more than a few revolvers (Uberti) that were extremely tight when new. The wedge was unbelievable tight and so was the barrel assembly on the arbor. I always use wood and a bit of grease to tap them out. A sliver of wood to tap out the wedge and a sliver of wood on top of the cylinder face so the rammer presses on the wood and not directly on the cylinder face when disassembling the revolver. NEVER metal on metal.

Last edited by Crawdad1; April 15, 2015 at 07:58 PM.
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Old April 15, 2015, 09:00 PM   #8
J-Bar
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I have had a couple of open tops that had arbors a tad too big in diameter, and had to polish the end of the arbor down with fine grit sandpaper to make reassembly trouble free.

The arbor should fit into the barrel assembly snugly, but should not require hammering of any kind to be fully seated.

Be careful when putting sideways pressure on the arbor. You don't want to loosen the base of the arbor where it is secured to the frame.

Last edited by J-Bar; April 15, 2015 at 09:20 PM.
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Old April 15, 2015, 09:20 PM   #9
44 Dave
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Before you do anything too rash.
I use lay out dye or a black marker to find exactly where the tight spot is.
most likely the arbor, especially where the wedge hole is broached but some have the alignment pins slightly off.
Once you correct the tight spot you will be happy to have a good tight gun.
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Old April 16, 2015, 12:06 AM   #10
NMRevolverGuy
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Looks like I got it. Combination of sanding and mild "persuasion" with the mallet did the trick. Its to the point now where I'd rather avoid sanding further, so for now I'll leave it as is and see if it loosens up over time. Thanks for the advice!

Last edited by NMRevolverGuy; April 16, 2015 at 03:13 AM.
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Old April 17, 2015, 05:30 PM   #11
BCRider
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If sanding did some of it then you want to check on the fit of the arbor in the hole of the barrel. I've yet to see one that slips in totally fine at any angle other than the correct one. It's almost like the hole is drilled in a curved path so the arbor needs to be banana shaped to slip into the hole correctly.

Watch for burrs or bump ups from the wedge around the slot on the arbor and in the slot of the barrel That's a good place to relieve the edges slightly if there's any deformation.

Wiping the arbor down with a broad tip felt marker is good for use as a "poor man's toolmaker's dye" and it'll quickly find the sticky spots by the silver markings where it's scraped away.
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Old April 17, 2015, 06:45 PM   #12
expat_alaska
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As I Was Taught

.. from Goon (Mike) as I recall:

Place the barrel into the arbor at a 90* angle from normal and check the fit of the barrel at the frame. If it looks as if it fits (no slop/interference) add a .001" or .002" shim into the barrel recess where the arbor contacts the barrel. It should move the barrel away from the frame by the same amount. If so, IMO, you are good to go. I have done the same with my new Pietta 1851 Navy steel .36 and I feel good to go. Mike is very much more versed on this subject and you should consult him.

If so, the arbor is contacting the barrel recess bottom and should not cause any undue wear upon the wedge.

Look at the clearance between the forcing cone and the cylinder: it should be .000"-.002" and no more.

Mine is less than .001" but has a slight vertical cant towards the cylinder.

Just my $.02 worth.

Jim
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Old April 17, 2015, 10:03 PM   #13
DD4lifeusmc
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start by making sure all serial numbered parts have the same number and were not accidentally mixed at the factory. Provided you did actually buy it brand new.
next look very carefully at the arbor. if it is trully fitting that tight,
there will be shiny spots where the arbor and the arbor hole in the barrel are rubbing together.
A couple things you can do.
Take to a gunsmith and have him dress it up for proper fit.
Or using emery cloth smooth down the shiny spots on the arbor.
Keep trial fitting till it will slide together as it should.
Be careful don't remove too much.
You may also need to buff the arbor hole in the barrel assembly.

While you're at it, look the arbor over very carefully for being bent or out of alignment.
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Old April 17, 2015, 11:54 PM   #14
45 Dragoon
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NMRev,
expat got it pretty much right for a Pietta (thanks expat!). Some (of any make) wont let the barrel go on all the way at 90 deg. so you may not be able to do that check (I dont even do that check any more) Bottom line is, yours is an Uberti so the arbor is short. It will take much more than a couple of .002 shims in the arbor hole to correct it. I'm not shure I would do much sanding, just assemble and disassemble several times is usually all that's needed. I end up bedding the end of the arbor to make sure it has no clearance (not add some by sanding), you want a nice tight fit. It will get fall off /drop on easy (and still be a close tol. fit with use.

Mike
www.goonsgunworks.com
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