Quantcast
auto vs rev ammmo - THR
THR  

Go Back   THR > Tools and Technologies > Handguns: Revolvers

Welcome to THR
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have, access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!


If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit the help section.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 12, 2014, 01:20 PM   #1
jins
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 4, 2014
Posts: 7
auto vs rev ammmo

Any significant difference in precision, range or velocity between .45acp and regular rimmed ammo when fired in a revolver?
jins is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 01:35 PM   #2
BobWright
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 11, 2014
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Posts: 273
No. I assume you mean .45 ACP as compared to .45 Auto Rim. I have loaded some very powerful and accurate cartridges in .45 ACP. I don't remember the powder charge, but using Accurate Arms No. 5 I had a .45 ACP round that had a 185 gr. JHP @ 1290 fps. This not for auto pistols, as likely too violent for operation of the slide.

This for Smith & Wesson revolvers in good condition, not for M1917 vintage guns.

Now if you are acomparing .45 ACP with .45 Colt, entirely different horses.

Bob Wright
BobWright is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 01:47 PM   #3
Cooldill
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 19, 2011
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,034
Well both .45 ACP and .45 auto rim are about the same except .45 auto rim has well... a rim and is designed for use in revolvers, but won't work in .45 ACP guns. .45 auto rim was made so moon clips weren't needed in extracting .45 ACP cartridges from revolver chambers.

Both can be loaded pretty hot, with nearly identical case capacity. But, loading both too hot can cause issues. An extra hot .45 ACP will batter an automatic slide, and too hot .45 auto rim can be harmful to old .45 ACP revolvers like the M1917.

But, set up a gun to shoot .45 Super, which basically is a .45 ACP with a stronger case to handle higher pressures, and you can shoot it in an auto. Likewise, .45 Super or hot .45 ACP +P+ can often be chambered in modern revolver like the S&W 625.

It really matter what platform you're planning on using these cartridges in, but both can be loaded quite hot and to about the exact same performance. It just depends how much the gun is designed to take.
Cooldill is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 06:48 PM   #4
herrwalther
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 1, 2013
Posts: 1,420
I think the OP meant firing .45ACP in a semi-auto versus firing .45ACP in a revolver using moon clips.

If that is the case the answer is not really. The difference you will find involves barrel length. As a .45 fired from a 6 inch barrel will move faster than fired from a 4" semi-auto barrel.
__________________
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
OEF Veteran
herrwalther is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 06:59 PM   #5
BCRider
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 15, 2008
Location: Pacific North"Wet" Coast of Canada
Posts: 6,306
Quote:
......between .45acp and regular rimmed ammo when fired in a revolver?
The way it's worded could be any number of things. For example I took it to be asking for a comparison of .45acp vs .45Colt when shot from a Ruger Convertible.

We'll just have to wait for jins to come back and clarify what he's asking.
__________________
Sent from my boat anchor desktop via my pizza greased fingers....
BCRider is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 07:19 PM   #6
dickydalton
Member
 
 
Join Date: October 6, 2012
Posts: 310
Don't forget gas and pressure loss at the cylinder gap.
dickydalton is offline  
Old August 12, 2014, 08:03 PM   #7
jins
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 4, 2014
Posts: 7
Herr walther got it right
jins is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 02:11 AM   #8
Cooldill
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 19, 2011
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,034
Well in that case, a 4" bbl revolver and a 4" bbl semi-automatic will generally have different velocities. The revolver with it's 4" bbl will generally be lower due to the cylinder gap.
Cooldill is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 04:12 AM   #9
ArchAngelCD
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 25, 2006
Location: Northeast PA, USA
Posts: 17,327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooldill View Post
Well in that case, a 4" bbl revolver and a 4" bbl semi-automatic will generally have different velocities. The revolver with it's 4" bbl will generally be lower due to the cylinder gap.
I was about to say the same but it's already said. I agree, the cylinder gap is the difference.
__________________
Remember boys and girls, gun control only prevents law abiding Americans from owning guns because the Bad Guys donít obey the laws, no matter how restrictive or lenient the laws are!
ArchAngelCD is online now  
Old August 13, 2014, 10:26 AM   #10
jins
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 4, 2014
Posts: 7
So that means despite the lower velocity, the revolver packs more stopping power under the circumstances because the bullet won't just pass through the target?
jins is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 10:49 AM   #11
BobWright
Member
 
 
Join Date: February 11, 2014
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Posts: 273
Quote:
Jins said:

So that means despite the lower velocity, the revolver packs more stopping power under the circumstances because the bullet won't just pass through the target?
While that is theoretically true, its not that simple. "Stopping Power" is a generally misused term. As far as defensive use, there is little practical difference in the .45 ACP fired from a revolver and fired from a pistol. This assuming the ammunition remains the same.

I don't know of anybody who carries a .45 ACP revolver for everyday use who would simply load it with factory ammunition. Handloaded ammunition loaded for the revolver will generally outstrip any developed for use in the pistol.

Bob Wright
BobWright is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 11:29 AM   #12
19-3Ben
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 5, 2006
Location: CT
Posts: 4,521
Quote:
I don't know of anybody who carries a .45 ACP revolver for everyday use who would simply load it with factory ammunition. Handloaded ammunition loaded for the revolver will generally outstrip any developed for use in the pistol.
You may not know anybody, but I'd be willing to bet good money that the vast majority of people who carry a .45acp revolver for defense, carry it with factory defensive loads.

A) the number of people who hand load are a minority in the gun world,
B) Factory ammo fromt eh major companies is darn good (Speer Gold Dot, Federal HST, etc..)
C) Many people prefer to carry factory ammo because they feel it gives them a legal edge should they ever be prosecuted for a defensive shooting (not saying it's right or wrong. Just saying it's a thing... a very contentious one at that).

Were I to carry a .45acp wheel gun, you can bet it would be loaded with the likes of Federal HST, Hornady Critical Duty, Speer Gold Dot, Winchester Ranger, or some other top notch defensive stuff.
__________________
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." Mae West
19-3Ben is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 11:31 AM   #13
19-3Ben
Member
 
 
Join Date: November 5, 2006
Location: CT
Posts: 4,521
Quote:
I agree, the cylinder gap is the difference.
I'd want to see numbers on that before stating it as a fact. If I remember correctly, there is not that much pressure lost through the BC gap, and also remember that with a revolver only measuring the barrel itself vs. semi auto also measuring the chamber, a 4" revolver gives a lot longer tube for acceleration than a 4" semi auto. The chamber/cylinder are not taken into the equation so it's kind of a bonus.

Not saying you're wrong. Just saying it's not as simple as yes/no.
__________________
"You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough." Mae West
19-3Ben is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 01:37 PM   #14
jins
Member
 
 
Join Date: August 4, 2014
Posts: 7
Just to remind cooldill (post #3)hot loads can be handled well by gas operated autos like the Wildey with pressure adjustment
jins is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 01:47 PM   #15
USSR
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 7, 2005
Posts: 7,830
Quote:
So that means despite the lower velocity, the revolver packs more stopping power under the circumstances because the bullet won't just pass through the target?
I hope this isn't "the bullet stopped inside the body, therefor it expending all it's energy" thought process?

Don
__________________
Never underestimate the amount of toil and angst a cheap SOB will put himself thru to save 50 cents.
USSR is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 05:21 PM   #16
moxie
Member
 
 
Join Date: December 30, 2002
Location: Erath Co., TX
Posts: 1,942
I, for one, carry factory ammo in my 625, same stuff as in my 1911.

As far as the Wildey goes, I don't know how it crept into this. It was never chambered for the .45ACP.
__________________
"If you have to shoot...shoot...don't talk." Tuco

U.S. Air Force Munitions, 1969-1992
Vietnam, 1972-1973
moxie is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 05:31 PM   #17
Sunray
Member
 
 
Join Date: May 17, 2003
Location: London, Ont.
Posts: 7,909
A revolver or a pistol will make no difference in velocity, if the barrels are of equal length and have the same rifling twist. Velocity loss due to the cylinder gap is insignificant.
There's no difference whatsoever in range or precision.
Sunray is offline  
Old August 13, 2014, 06:24 PM   #18
2zulu1
Member
 
 
Join Date: July 18, 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 930
Sierra #5 has different powder weight data between a pistol and revolver. I load different weights between a 1911 and an N-frame M25-2.

Using Sierra's 240gr JHC as an example, the 5" Gov"t has an MV of ~900 fps while the 6" 1955 Target has an MV of ~1100fps. Ejected brass from both platforms can be reloaded, check brass like you would any other caliber.

The cylinder gap of SAAMI spec'd revolvers has minimal velocity loss, if any.
2zulu1 is offline  
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise.
This site, its contents, Shooting Reviews, and its contents are Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Firearms Forum, Inc.
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
Although The High Road has attempted to provide accurate information on the forum, The High Road assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information. All information is provided "as is" with all faults without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. Neither The High Road nor any of its directors, members, managers, employees, agents, vendors, or suppliers will be liable for any direct, indirect, general, bodily injury, compensatory, special, punitive, consequential, or incidental damages including, without limitation, lost profits or revenues, costs of replacement goods, loss or damage to data arising out of the use or inability to use this forum or any services associated with this forum, or damages from the use of or reliance on the information present on this forum, even if you have been advised of the possibility of such damages.