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Old January 27, 2016, 10:16 PM   #1
cmb3366
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Shooting Gloves

I did some load development with my new model 69 yesterday, working up 4227 under a 255gr Keith, after 40 rounds I noticed my thumb, right at the base near the web of my hand was rubbed raw with a layer of skin removed. Needless to say, my shooting session ended early, and I've been a little sore since. While I am not going to send a steady diet of these heavy loads down range in this gun, I also don't like the idea of incurring physical damage when the mood strikes me to make some thunder. I really like the feel of the factory grips and don't want to change them out. I am thinking a set of shooting gloves might be the ticket. I want something with open fingertips, decent dexterity, and some cushioning for recoil. My initial research zeroed in on Pact recoil gloves, but the reviews I read online indicate that they fall apart in short order. Can anyone recommend me a brand or model shooting that has worked well and held up over time?
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Old January 28, 2016, 01:31 AM   #2
eldon519
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I've got an S&W 69. I just wear a cheap mechanic type glove from Home Depot with the index finger cutoff. That generally keeps the rubbing/blisters down. The Hogue X-frame grip like off of the S&W .500s will do wonders for the soreness. I tried 4 or 5 grips and that was my favorite. 100rd sessions are not unreasonable with the glove and Hogue.

http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/w...layErrorView_N
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Old January 28, 2016, 01:40 AM   #3
Jim Watson
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I wore a handball glove with padded palm and index finger cut off when shooting IHMSA with .44 Magnum revolver and .30-30 Contender.
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Old January 28, 2016, 02:36 AM   #4
weblance
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Bicycle gloves are excellent. Padded palm, open fingertips, perfect.
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Old January 28, 2016, 03:58 AM   #5
Shootshellz
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Sailing gloves work well. Open fingertips with rough leather palms that allow a better grip on a firearm than smooth bicycle gloves.
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Old January 28, 2016, 09:37 AM   #6
MaxP
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ProAim makes a great pair of shooting gloves.

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Old January 28, 2016, 11:08 AM   #7
stu1ritter
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+1 on the X-frame grip (available from S&W) being both a recoil absorber and a totally different experience to the shooting hand. I have one on my 629-3.
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Old January 28, 2016, 03:04 PM   #8
buck460XVR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stu1ritter View Post
+1 on the X-frame grip (available from S&W) being both a recoil absorber and a totally different experience to the shooting hand.
+2. Much better option than a glove, IMHO.
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Old January 28, 2016, 03:55 PM   #9
Drail
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I went through this with hot loads in a .41 Mag. Bisley years ago. I tried every kind of glove I could find. Didn't make any difference - when the grip recoiled back into my hand it left skid marks as it rotated - even through a heavy leather glove. Proper grips are the answer. The grip needs to come straight back into your hand with no rocking - if the grip is rotating it will take off skin. Or lighten up the loads a little - it is, after all, an L frame. A man's got to know his limitations.
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Old January 28, 2016, 07:41 PM   #10
JerryND
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As I get older I find recoil more of a problem. Also have a bad elbow which creates a problem holding a shotgun or rifle. Went to the local Farm Supply to buy a shooting glove. Clerk recommended a Batting Glove. Cheaper and lasts longer. It works great but the trigger finger is a little too large and needs to be cut off for trigger clearance.
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Old January 28, 2016, 09:48 PM   #11
weblance
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Quote:
Sailing gloves work well. Open fingertips with rough leather palms that allow a better grip on a firearm than smooth bicycle gloves.
Bicycle gloves are leather. I'm not sure where you saw that they were slippery... Mine aren't
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Old January 28, 2016, 11:45 PM   #12
cmb3366
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I appreciate the replies, the discussion of grips that eliminate rolling in the hand makes sense, a set of the m500 grips are on order, going to get myself some sailing gloves as well. Until this thread I did not know sailing gloves were a thing, but pictures I've seen look like what I want.
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Old January 29, 2016, 12:50 PM   #13
Zendude
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I use a weightlifting glove. Some have too much padding but the thinner cheaper ones are about right.
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Old January 29, 2016, 03:52 PM   #14
BobWright
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My guess is that you are using those rubber grips. Get rid of those and get some oil finished wood, walnut, rosewood, or goncala alves wood. And stay away from those laminated "stabilized" wood grips!

If you do continue using glaoves, be aware of one thing, they can change you point of impact and affect accuracy if you switch from bare hands to gloves.

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Old January 30, 2016, 11:11 AM   #15
eldon519
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I tried some Nille Grifs on my 69. Wood was not the answer for me. Dug the cylinder release into my thumb knuckle no matter how hard I held it and every follow up shot required re-gripping the gun. The X-frame Hogue is where it's at.
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Old January 30, 2016, 11:42 AM   #16
stoky
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I like the PAST gloves for heavy recoiling stuff. Their sizing runs small (which may be a factor in longevity). Mine have held up well.
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Old January 30, 2016, 08:32 PM   #17
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Several years ago at the end of the cold season when stores were putting their gloves on sale, I purchased a pair of "driving" gloves and have used them ever since for my shooting.They are made of leather, nice and thin, didn't cost much at all and store easy in my range bag.
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Old January 31, 2016, 11:37 PM   #18
Shootshellz
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IMHO wood grips are for termites. Hogue rubber grips are the ticket, along with sailing gloves. By the way, there is a difference between smooth leather (bicycle, batting, driving and golf gloves) and roughout leather (sailing gloves). Sailing gloves allow much more 'traction' on your handgun.
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Old February 1, 2016, 07:43 PM   #19
isaactc
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Gloves

Although not a tactical guy, I bought a pair of SKD Pig Gloves ($29.95) several years ago. They work very well with my revolvers as well as with pistols. They give me good protection from bruising the knuckle on my middle finger when shooting any handgun with considerable recoil. The dexterity is the best I have encountered and they are warm in above freezing temps. I have not been able to damage these gloves. Very well constructed and a bargain at under $35 bucks. I highly recommend trying these out.
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Old February 3, 2016, 10:08 AM   #20
ScaryWoody
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I use bicycle gloves from Walmart. It really helps with the magnums.
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Old February 4, 2016, 05:51 PM   #21
Lazy R
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I use good batting gloves. Retain dexterity, thin enough as to not mess up your grip, and they absorb/redistribute a surprising amount of recoil.
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Old February 4, 2016, 08:26 PM   #22
L-2
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Just last week I bought new gloves from Home Depot:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grease-Mo...2103/202188309

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-Lar...3-16/203607124

I couldn't decide and bought both brands.
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Old Yesterday, 09:22 AM   #23
MaxP
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Here's another view of the ProAim gloves. I have shot thousands of heavy revolver rounds wearing them (about 7,000 last year alone) and they have held up well. The only issue I've had was a recent seem that opened during a 400 round .480 Ruger test session), but was easily corrected.

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Old Today, 02:07 PM   #24
Paul7
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Get some weightlifting gloves at Wal-Mart, less than $10.
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Old Today, 09:39 PM   #25
CraigC
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I like the full fingered Uncle Mike's leather shooting gloves but only use them when it's very hot or very cold.


Quote:
If you do continue using gloves, be aware of one thing, they can change you point of impact and affect accuracy if you switch from bare hands to gloves.
Yep. I hardly ever use gloves but when I do, it can change the POI significantly.


Quote:
IMHO wood grips are for termites. Hogue rubber grips are the ticket, along with sailing gloves. By the way, there is a difference between smooth leather (bicycle, batting, driving and golf gloves) and roughout leather (sailing gloves). Sailing gloves allow much more 'traction' on your handgun.
Rubber grips are a crutch. What is important is how the grips fit your hand, not that they're made of squishy rubber. A wood grip that fits your hand will be far more comfortable than a rubber grip that doesn't.
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