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Old December 20, 2015, 12:57 PM   #1
NoirFan
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Who makes good historic black powder replicas?

Hi all, this is my first foray into the black powder side of shooting. I've always been a huge history lover and I'd like to start shooting some of these old school muzzle loaders I keep reading about. I could use some help finding a good place to start shopping and learning though.

I'm most interested in the Baker rifle (blame it on Bernard Cornwell), LeMat Revolver, and the British Brown Bess and French Charleville. This site http://www.militaryheritage.com/ is the top search result for these weapons. Anyone had experience with them?
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Old December 20, 2015, 01:57 PM   #2
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Regarding the designs you mentioned, I think Pedersoli is probably the best of the mass market manufacturers. There are many custom makers who produce more authentic and quality black power firearms but if you are looking for something that you can buy from a retailer I would look at Pedersoli. If you are interested in the Old West revolvers than you should consider Uberti and Pietta.

My assumption is the firearms from the website you mentioned are made in India. There is lots of controversy about Indian muzzle loaders because they are not built to fire actual ammo but are modified when imported.

Last edited by MAKster; December 20, 2015 at 07:23 PM.
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Old December 20, 2015, 07:08 PM   #3
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Check out Dixie Gun Works. You can order great quality BP weapons in either finished or kit form with a lot of them. I have enjoyed having time, effort, and a part of me in the kits I have finished. It makes shooting them that much sweeter.
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Old December 20, 2015, 08:45 PM   #4
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$$$$.

There are many custom builders that can build an authentic replica.
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Old December 22, 2015, 11:10 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help all. So I should stay away from the Military Heritage India-made guns then? I'm starting to find mixed reviews from around the internet, from people who actually use them for shooting.
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Old December 22, 2015, 12:04 PM   #6
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i think the parker hale rifle and carbine made by the british on original tools are amount the best. eastbank.
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Old December 22, 2015, 12:51 PM   #7
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Back to the OP...

There's no production Baker rifle available. The only option would be to procure components and have someone build one for you.

As to a LeMat, Pietta makes a repro. Quality of manufacture is OK, not great. It's a heavy beast.

Pedersoli makes the best commercial repro of the Brown Bess and Charleville.
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Old December 22, 2015, 01:18 PM   #8
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I think peso for peso, Davide Pedersoli is the finest maker of PRODUCTION muzzleloading guns. They've got a wide range of models, manufacturing level is excellent for the price. Authenticity might not be that great on most models, but the darn things just tend to shoot.
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Old December 22, 2015, 02:04 PM   #9
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Good morning, Noirfan,
It is great to get someone enthusiastically involved in Black Powder repros and originals, shooting and owning\cherishing. It's happening more and more often as folks rediscover these amazing firearms. As an owner of a Pietta LeMat, I'll throw in on that one that you mentioned. Pietta has faithfully reproduced this Confederate horse pistol. 'Faithfully' means that the same things that were an issue with the original have to be addressed by the owners of the repros. I'm happy to say that they are minor ( weak loading arm and tendency of the shotgun rammer to launch it self when the revolver is fired ) and easily set right with a little ingenuity from the owner. The Revolver is beautifully made and the quality and craftsmanship on mine are easily visible. Should you get a LeMat, you won't be disappointed by 'The Grapeshot Revolver'
regards!
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Last edited by PainlessWolf; December 23, 2015 at 02:50 PM.
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Old December 22, 2015, 07:15 PM   #10
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For just about anything black powder, either muzzleloaders or cartridge, Pedersoli is the best. High price for super high quality.

I don't buy any Pedersoli revolvers because I think Uberti and Pietta are the better bang for my buck, in that they're very popular and I can get spare parts or conversion cylinders for them easily and at a good price.

For long guns, I think if you want a superb 19th Century replica rifle or shotgun, there is no one better than Pedersoli. I can say with certainty that within 5 years, as long as Pedersoli continues to produce such high quality guns, I will buy a .45-70 Rolling Block and a 20 gauge Howdah pistol.
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Old December 22, 2015, 07:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TruthTellers View Post
For just about anything black powder, either muzzleloaders or cartridge, Pedersoli is the best. High price for super high quality.

I don't buy any Pedersoli revolvers because I think Uberti and Pietta are the better bang for my buck, in that they're very popular and I can get spare parts or conversion cylinders for them easily and at a good price.

For long guns, I think if you want a superb 19th Century replica rifle or shotgun, there is no one better than Pedersoli. I can say with certainty that within 5 years, as long as Pedersoli continues to produce such high quality guns, I will buy a .45-70 Rolling Block and a 20 gauge Howdah pistol.
Indeed.

The biggest problem you'll have with Pedersoli is choosing which model to buy!!! I can EASILY name about a dozen rifles and muskets I want from them right off the top of my head!!
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Old December 22, 2015, 07:58 PM   #12
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There are only three company's that make safe black powder firearms, Umberti
Pietta and Pedrosellie. Stay away from items from India, they are crap.
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Old December 22, 2015, 09:46 PM   #13
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If you get a Baker made, you should also get the horn to go with it. The Rifle Shoppe sells the components.
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Old December 23, 2015, 11:13 AM   #14
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Thanks for the advice everyone. A lot of good opinions on Pedersoli but I see in their catalog they don't make a Baker rifle. They do have a ton of selection though. I think this will be a more involved and expensive hobby than I had thought. I'd appreciate any more recommendations on makers.
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Old December 23, 2015, 11:27 AM   #15
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Look in the mirror. You can if you want to take the time to learn how to use hand tools.

I did (take classes at NMLRA Gunbuilding classes as well as Conner Prairie and the Log Cabin Shop) and have built a couple of flintlocks. Never did a Baker and I'd rather do a Pattern 1776 or a jager myself. The Baker after all borrowed many of its features from various jagers.

BTW, I'd cheat and go with a 1:66" twist barrel instead of the Baker's slower 1:120" twist barrel. Gawd that was a slow, slow twist. I think there were some faster twist civilian Baker rifles carried by the various gentlemen volunteer rifle corps that were very popular when England was afraid that Boney would invade their island.
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Old December 23, 2015, 01:34 PM   #16
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Mike did make some good videos about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJBN...6wZnIug7XXhqQE here to https://www.full30.com/video/95792ea...7d2e7f5227894a

Last edited by Erwan; December 23, 2015 at 01:40 PM.
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