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Old Yesterday, 09:41 AM   #1
rdtompki
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Effective of Room Temperature on Reloading

I'm days away from having everything set up in an uninsulated bunkhouse. While are temperatures are mild the room will get down to 40deg in the winter and 90deg or so in the summer. I can (and will) moderate those temps with an air conditioner at the far end of the 400 sq.ft. room and a radiant space heater, but the temperatures indicated would definitely come into play.

I have a Hornady LNL AP press. I have both an inexpensive electronic scale and a beam balance scale. I suspect the electronic scale is the weakest link in terms of temperature sensitivity. I wouldn't think the mechanical nature of the press over those temperatures would be much affected. Do I have any reason for concern (I'm a measure thrice, cut once sort of guy)?
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Old Yesterday, 09:49 AM   #2
Okcafe86
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The only thing id be concerned with is long term storage of powder in 90 degree heat.
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Old Yesterday, 10:25 AM   #3
Blue68f100
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With digital scales most have an operating range of 50-100F. I find that you need to have them warm up for 24hrs to get stable readings. Other wise the zero seams to drift. I use the AC pack only since the scales do not turn off every 5 min.

Store your powders as close to the floor as you can for more stable temps. It will be cooler in the summer and ground heat (slab) may keep them a little warmer in the winter. Or just put them in a ice chest, insulated box to slow the temp swing down.

I live here in Texas so 100+ is quite normal in the summer. I keep my powders in the house. Primers I store in the garage, since they are not effected by the temp swing.
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Old Yesterday, 10:41 AM   #4
bds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue68f100
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdtompki
I have both an inexpensive electronic scale and a beam balance scale. I suspect the electronic scale is the weakest link in terms of temperature sensitivity.
digital scales most have an operating range of 50-100F.
+1 One of my digital scales specified around 59F - 95F. When other reloaders used their digital scales outside of specified temperature range, they got inconsistent/erratic readings.

It's good that you also have a beam scale to use when you must reload outside of digital scale operating temperature range.
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Old Yesterday, 11:02 AM   #5
p228alex
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Ive been wondering this also... especialy temp affect on powder... i keep most of my powder in the house, but i left a jug of titegroup out in the shop all summer. And now the grains stick to the insode of my powder dropper... i took it aparts amd cleaned it, with a brush, ( compressed air wasnt eenough) but it still sticks when i pour in a new amount of powder tdhe thing still dropps accurately, and the ammo shoots fine though.
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Old Yesterday, 12:59 PM   #6
1hobie
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Check Weights

http://shop.rcbs.com/Products/Powder...k-Weights.aspx

These will allow you to make sure your scales are reading correctly. For $40, these will give you peace of mind.

Good luck in your new endeavor!

Hobie
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Old Yesterday, 01:11 PM   #7
oneounceload
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Store your powder indoors until ready to use; bring back indoors when done - that also helps keep more than one powder from accidentally being used.....

The army stores their stuff in world-wide conditions that are a lot more variable than yours, so ammo should be fine - your electronic scale - as mentioned above - will beed to warm up, keep it away from fluorescent lighting and any air currents from fans or open windows
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Old Yesterday, 01:12 PM   #8
Reloadron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p228alex View Post
Ive been wondering this also... especialy temp affect on powder... i keep most of my powder in the house, but i left a jug of titegroup out in the shop all summer. And now the grains stick to the insode of my powder dropper... i took it aparts amd cleaned it, with a brush, ( compressed air wasnt eenough) but it still sticks when i pour in a new amount of powder tdhe thing still dropps accurately, and the ammo shoots fine though.
The most common cause of powder sticking to the powder hopper is static electricity build up (Static Cling) assuming the powder hopper is clean and dry. The common solution is to wipe down the hopper with a drier sheet to reduce the static charge and static cling.

As to rdtompki's original question. Powder and other reloading components should be stored in accordance with manufacturers published data. For powder this generally is summed up as store in a cool dry place.


* Properties of Smokeless Powder from S A A M I
* How to Check Smokeless Powder For Deterioration
* Considerations for Storage of Smokeless Powder
* Recommendations for Storage of Smokeless Powder

As to the actual environment we load in? I would figure any temperature and humidity we are comfortable in. That being within reason. This link is a read on the subject. Unfortunately there is reams of data on component storage but little said about the actual enviroment during the hand loading process.

Ron
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Old Yesterday, 01:17 PM   #9
tcj
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My reloading room is in an unheated, detached garage. I often will load in the winter when it's down in the upper 20's.

What I do is run my space heater to take the edge off and let the scale warm up for at least a 1/2 hour...then I reset zero every time I weigh. Not a big deal since once I've got a load dialed in all I do is a spot check every hundred or so rounds thereafter.
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Old Yesterday, 03:51 PM   #10
moxie
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Actually a 40-90 degree environment is not bad for storage of powder. In the military, ammo is often stored for long periods in much hotter or colder environments and it still goes bang. In Iraq, 90 degrees is frigid. Many of us carry loaded guns in much hotter or colder environments. The ammo still goes bang. The powder doesn't know whether it's in a jug or a brass case with a bullet on top.

The proverbial "cool dry place" is always optimum, but often hard to find. Is your bunkhouse in an area with high or low humidity? High humidity is a greater concern to a reloader than temperature. If high you might consider putting any opened containers of powder in a GI ammo can (they are designed to burst open under pressure and won't lead to an explosion), or just a Tupperware style container. Just to protect against humidity.
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Old Yesterday, 04:01 PM   #11
Sunray
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Like moxie says, humidity is more important than temperature. If you get a lot of humidity changes with changing temperatures anything ferrous will rust.
I doubt a 400 square foot room would cost too much to insulate. I'd look in a Habitat Restore shop for some rigid foam sheets and plywood for the floor.
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Old Yesterday, 10:21 PM   #12
rdtompki
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I'm going to try and get some insulation blown into the ceiling. Normally I'd lay in insulation, but it's a very shallow roof. The building is on a slab and already carpeted, probably not a major source of temperature variation. I do think I'll store powder in the house or in my barn tack room: as often suggested best to have only one power at a time on the reloading bench.
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Old Yesterday, 10:46 PM   #13
Lost Sheep
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What Sunray said

Chemicals (powder, primers) I recommend keeping in stable temps...gear is another question if unable to keep in controlled environment.

So, let me echo and amplify what sunray said.

Be assiduous with lubrication, rust protection and moisture abatement.

Lost Sheep
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Old Yesterday, 10:49 PM   #14
rfwobbly
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Quote:
Like moxie says, humidity is more important than temperature. If you get a lot of humidity changes with changing temperatures anything ferrous will rust.
Sunray hit the nail on the head. With no real temperature control, humidity is going to be a much bigger factor for you than temperature. Dies and press parts will start to show rust.


Quote:
I doubt a 400 square foot room would cost too much to insulate.
Insulating for habitation temperature levels would be much easier and cheaper if you could enclose a simple 12x12 ft space. That's all that's needed for reloading. Then you could easily heat and cool cheaply with a window unit and oil-filled electric heater.

Both Lowes and Home Depot rent insulation blowers and the bulk insulation. Then there are probably local companies that do the new spray-on foam. Lots of ways to make a small room REALLY cozy and weather-tight.

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Old Today, 10:19 AM   #15
Dudedog
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Inexpensive check weights

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh...=check+weights

$10

The weights are ok, the tweezers are a PITA. Class M2
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Old Today, 11:40 AM   #16
rdtompki
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Quote:
Insulating for habitation temperature levels would be much easier and cheaper if you could enclose a simple 12x12 ft space. That's all that's needed for reloading. Then you could easily heat and cool cheaply with a window unit and oil-filled electric heater.
True, but management wouldn't want me to hack up what is a very nice finished space. Long term there is a separate access room that is of ideal size, but I need to figure out where I can store all the lumber and paint supplies currently residing therein. That room could easily be redone with insulation, etc.. We'll see how my reloading journey unfolds.
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