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Old Yesterday, 08:04 PM   #1
bikemutt
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Steyr Scout proved itself today, short range report

So I finally got the Steyr Scout .308 rifle all put together and took it out to the 100 yard range today.

Preparation included a custom made 1/2x20 to 5/8x24 thread adapter so I could mount the QD brake suppressor mount. Found a Realtree camo stock that I fell for like a hungry trout on a worm. Lastly, mounted a Viper Vortex PST FFP 6-20x50 with Burris Extreme rings. Suppressor is a YHM Phantom Ti 30 cal, QD mounted.

Ammo was CBC white box 150 grain .308 "sniper", bought retail for around $1 per round during the last panic.

Once I had the scope dialed in, it was time for some work. After each shot of this 5 shot group I looked through the spotting scope and muttered something
along the lines of "please don't let me choke on the next shot". When it was all done I sat back in disbelief. I'm not a very good marksman, somehow this rifle/ammo combination gave me a chance be a decent one today.

This one's a keeper, and hopefully worth sharing with the good folks here at THR.





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Old Yesterday, 08:25 PM   #2
dmancornell
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Did you allow a cooldown period? Mine (in 7mm-08) groups horribly once the barrel is hot, which is after 3 shots with that skinny barrel.
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Old Yesterday, 08:33 PM   #3
loose noose
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bikemutt, great shooting, however your barrel looks awfully thin. Other than that it looks like you've got a keeper.
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Old Yesterday, 09:06 PM   #4
bikemutt
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No cool down between shots. Getting on paper and dialing in was paused for a cold range target change, then off to work. Tell you what though, that suppressor was HOT!

I agree the barrel is on the skinny side, ambient temperature was knocking on 90 degrees today.

I tried a group with Hornady 168 grain premium match ammo, it didn't group near as good as it did with with the "cheap" stuff. The guy next me advised "so shoot the cheap stuff".
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Old Yesterday, 09:24 PM   #5
back40
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looks like a nice shooting rifle. is that the scope you're keeping on it? seems like a lot of glass for a "scout rifle". not knocking it, just curious.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 PM   #6
bikemutt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by back40 View Post
looks like a nice shooting rifle. is that the scope you're keeping on it? seems like a lot of glass for a "scout rifle". not knocking it, just curious.
I've had this scope on several different rifles, never felt a synergy. I feel good about this move, maybe this is the one.
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Old Today, 10:48 AM   #7
Willie Sutton
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<grump mode on>

We put in twenty years of work and experimentation and conferences and trials to define and finally get a manufacturer to build a Scout Rifle, and all it takes is a huge scope and a suppressor and then shoot it off a bench to take away every reason that the rifle exists....

Jeff Cooper would roll in his grave.... others who worked in the group just get grumpy.





Nice group in any event.


<grump mode off now>


Willie

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Old Today, 10:58 AM   #8
H&Hhunter
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Mine groups like that at 100 yards with IER 2.5 power scout scope on it. And it also doesn't care if it's hot, it just keeps thumping them in a tiny little group all day long. Here is the deal with a scout rifle for Mr. grumpy above. Set up as a scout rifle it is a fantastic general purpose rifle as Jeff Cooper designed it to be. However the Steyr is so accurate and precise of a rifle that putting big glass changes the character of the rifle into something different and just as good for another intended purpose. Making the Steyr one of the most versatile and useable general purpose rifles built bar none.

Adding a bipod under the bipod doesn't do anything for me though I have to say..

To each their own.
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Bell who?? He did what with a .275 Rigby?;)

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Old Today, 11:04 AM   #9
Willie Sutton
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Here is the deal with a scout rifle for Mr. grumpy above


I'm one of the guys who assisted in developing the concept... I "get it". I've got two of the absolutely original prototypes from Gunsite in my rack.

Steyr makes good stuff. I would just use another of their platforms if my mission was to add a can, huge glass, and a bipod under the bipod. Getting a manufacturer to incorporate a bipod into the system was a near stopping point for the project, and is one of the reasons that Steyr was selected in the end as the manufacturer. Nobody else seemed to be interested in developing it. Ignoring it and adding another bipod is, well..... <sigh>....


This would be a much more suitable platform for someone who's ignoring the inherant design features of the Scout though:

http://www.steyrarms.com/products/hu...es/pro-hunter/


I do see the value of the rifle set up with bigger glass for one-shot hunts after carrying it all day. I truly do.


Impressive accuracy with the can installed as well. Very impressive in fact.


Willie

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Old Today, 11:17 AM   #10
bikemutt
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Well, Steyr threaded the barrel and put the an extended rail on it, figured I may as well use 'em

BTW, the rifle, while a very civilized shooter, is even more so with the suppressor.

As far as the bipod goes, the integrated one as I understand it is a convenience feature, intended for field use when an awkward shot may present itself, not for everyday use. I have deployed the bipods and find them to be on the flimsy side although I don't know what it would take to break one, nor do I wish to find out. There must be a reason Steyr provided a very sturdy dovetail rail right where the bipod in the picture is shown, if not for an auxiliary bipod, then what?
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Old Today, 11:37 AM   #11
H&Hhunter
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Quote:
There must be a reason Steyr provided a very sturdy dovetail rail right where the bipod in the picture is shown, if not for an auxiliary bipod, then what?
Yes there is a reason and a bipod wasn't it. The reason that rail is there for the addition of a "leopard light". It was to attach a tac light on to the bottom of the gun for use in leopard follow up in the dark and other nighttime endeavors. It was most certainly NOT there for the attachment of a bipod under the bipod.

With a good light attached it makes the Steyr into one of the nicest camp guns imaginable in DG or big bear country. I leave the gun sitting on the open bipod at night if you need it you reach over hit the light and have one heck of a good defensive weapon ready to go in the pitch dark. Almost like Jeff Cooper knew what he was doing.
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Bell who?? He did what with a .275 Rigby?;)

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Last edited by H&Hhunter; Today at 11:44 AM.
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Old Today, 11:42 AM   #12
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BTW if I was wanting a purpose built precision rifle from Steyr this is the one I'd think real serious about.

http://www.steyrarms.com/products/sp...s/steyr-elite/

However I have scoped my scout with big glass just to see how it did, and it did great. But I went back to a scout scope as it is far more useful to me as general purpose rifle. I have gone to a 1X4 power IER though as there are times especially when deer hunting when I need a bit more magnification than 2.5X. And that is usually when trying to pick out a specific deer in lower light in the brush.
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Bell who?? He did what with a .275 Rigby?;)

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Old Today, 12:00 PM   #13
Willie Sutton
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As far as the bipod goes, the integrated one as I understand it is a convenience feature, intended for field use when an awkward shot may present itself, not for everyday use.


You understand incorrectly.

You own a rifle that is the end result of a lot of very very smart people putting a very very great effort into figuring out what makes a very very efficient single-shot RIGHT NOW on target rifle that is designed to be carried for weeks and shot once.

The rifle is designed to be shot from the shoulder using a Ching Sling.

The rifle is designed to have a bipod integrally built for the VERY rare times one is needed and for being able (as was pointed out above) to be lain down next to your sleeping bag ready to be picked up for use in camp.

The rail is, as is pointed out above, for a Light.

While capable of excellent accuracy, the rifle is designed and built to be used in the role intended. Use off a bench with an aftermarket bipod and a large scope shows a lack of understanding (or understanding but lack of exploitation) of the EXCELLENT features incorporated into the rifle by design.

Here's an idea: Put a IER scope on it, stand up like a man, sling into a Ching-Sling, and have a friend toss clay birds with a hand thrower. Shoot them in the air. That's a fair representation of the shots at fleeting game (or men) that the rifle was designed to be used for.


Did I mention that I'm impressed with the accuracy with the can? Wrong rifle, but that can is sure dialed in.



Willie

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Old Today, 12:03 PM   #14
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Who cares? It's HIS RIFLE and he can do what he wants with it. Buncha curmudgeons.

I like it. Great shooting!
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Old Today, 12:05 PM   #15
200Apples
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bikemutt, nice shooting.

May I suggest, so that you may derive even more delight from using this fine rifle, that you remove the scope and use the flip-up ghost ring sight that is factory installed and see how the rifle shoots to 100 - 200 yds...

Then head on over to scoutrifle dot org, introduce yourself (if you're not already there! Aren't you? I could swear that you are, now that I think about it!...) and order either a Ching sling or a Rhodesian sling from Andy's Leather.

Then! (in no particular order) secure a copy of Cooper's "The Art of the Rifle".

Here, too, for your viewing pleasure (and since you are the proud owner of a Steyr Scout) are some of the many thoughts on the subject from the spiritual father of the Steyr Scout himself:

Quote:
Jeff Cooper, October, 2005

It may be suggested that I push the Steyr Scout rifle pretty hard, but I do not do so for cash or any other sort of economic reward. I push the Scout because to me it represents excellence, and I revere excellence. It is not perfect - nothing is - but it is close, and since it is my personal concept, I take parental pride in it.

I also push the "Co-pilot," the Blazer R93 and the 1911 Colt pistol without royalties. In that connection, I once proposed a royalty to the president of Steyr-Mannlicher, that is the man who was at that time president of the corporation. The prospect seemed to distress him to the extent that I quickly changed the subject. I would not have turned down a royalty on the Scout if it had been offered, but the issue did not seem important. The Steyr Scout is not any great commercial success. The market evidently does not prize any sort of general-purpose item to the extent that a special purpose product does anything well. This inhibits "turnover," which is the life of trade. Few men need a rifle. What rifle producers sell are toys, and the more different kinds of toys are available, the better it is for trade. If a man has a Steyr Scout, he does not need anything else in that line, except for specialties. The Steyr Scout is not a target rifle, nor an inner city riot suppresser, nor an elephant gun, but it will do for almost anything else, if we exclude the ubiquitous 22. A recent friend and disciple taking off next year for Africa acquired a 416 Remington, when what he needed was a Steyr Scout, as issued or in Dragoon (376) configuration. What the Steyr Scout offers above all is convenience and "friendliness." It is the most "shootable" instrument I know of.

You may note that I stick closely to "Steyr Scout" because of the misuse of the term "scout" by itself. Two domestic approximators are now producing what they evidently consider to be scout rifles, utilizing a term scout in the tradition of the old American West, which is not where I got it. My concept derived from the US military doctrine which defines a scout as a soldier working alone or in partnership with one other soldier. Frederick Russell Burnham was particularly proud of his title of "Chief of Scouts" under Lord Roberts in the Boer War. The scouts, of which Burnham was chief, were frontiersmen only coincidently. Basically they were reconnaissance troops sent out beyond lines to determine the location and operational conduct of the enemy. In one notable operation prior to his working for Lord Roberts, Burnham undertook the assassination of the enemy leader, which turned out to be a remarkable success - roughly paralleling Hanneken's assassination of Charlemagne Peralte in Haiti in 1918. Thus a scout can be a "hit man" if the occasion demands, but that is not his primary definition. According to a manual which I studied in high school, "A scout is a man trained in ground and cover, movement from cover to cover, map reading, rifle marksmanship, observation, and accurately reporting the results of his observation." Note the stipulation of rifle marksmanship. A scout must be a good shot - a good practical shot, a hunter. A "scout rifle" should be a rifle for such a man. As it turns out, the current Steyr Scout rifle is a good deal more than that, and what a happy development it turned out to be! What it is not, however, is a short, bolt-action rifle with the telescope mounted forward. The scout rifle does not need a telescope sight, and I used Scout I extensively in Central America mounting ghost-ring only. The features of the Steyr Scout now offered are primarily mine, except for the superb stock design, which is the result of Zedrosser and Bilgeri at Steyr. This stock is, in my opinion, a triumph - marvelously comfortable for almost everyone. I do not think it needs the optional length of pull. A short stock is no handicap to a man with long arms, whereas a long stock is uncomfortable for a shooter with short arms. I suggest simply abandoning the stock spacers on the Steyr Scout and leaving it at short option.

As now issued, the Steyr Scout has only a couple of minor drawbacks. Its magazine well should be cut forward about a quarter of an inch to facilitate breech inspection with the little finger. The bipod retaining pin should be made of metal rather than plastic, as it has been known to sheer with extensive use. It has no need for an intermediate sling socket on the starboard side, and it has no need to be offered in goofy calibers such as the 223.

I am clearly very proud of the Steyr Scout as it stands. I am mildly annoyed to see low-rate copies being offered by major producers. With firearms as with many other things in life, you get what you pay for.
http://myweb.cebridge.net/mkeithr/Jeff/jeff13_9.html
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Old Today, 12:11 PM   #16
200Apples
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Quote:
Who cares? It's HIS RIFLE...

WE care.

Relax.
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"The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts." - Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1943

"Surely you have noticed the extent to which thinking is going out of style." - Jeff Cooper, January, 2000
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Old Today, 12:11 PM   #17
Willie Sutton
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^^^

Sums it up well. As expected from the desk of the Colonel.



"Who cares? It's HIS RIFLE and he can do what he wants with it."

I suppose you *could* buy a new Porsche and take it four-wheeling in the desert.
But other Porsche enthusiasts wouild cringe...



Enjoy a Scout as a Scout.


Willie

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Old Today, 12:33 PM   #18
tiamat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie Sutton
I suppose you *could* buy a new Porsche and take it four-wheeling in the desert.
But other Porsche enthusiasts wouild cringe...
oh really?



What a shame that someone's not using a product the way you think they should...
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Old Today, 12:39 PM   #19
Willie Sutton
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^^

I'm familiar with the concept. Carrera Panamericana and Paris-Dakar and all that (I teach on the track for the PCA for my other hobby).

Let's rephrase for comprehension:

"I suppose you could take a Porsche GT3 and take it four wheeling in the desert, but other Porsche enthusiasts would cringe".


Fair enough?


Willie

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Old Today, 12:56 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 200Apples View Post
WE care.

Relax.
YOU RELaX!@#!@#!@#!@#!@

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Old Today, 01:08 PM   #21
The_Next_Generation
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I think a lightweight rifle is a great starting point for an accurate suppressed build. Suppressors add a bit of weight, and so does a nice scope. Why not eliminate some of the heft by building on a lighter "scout" rifle?

I've thought of doing something similar with the 18" 308 American from Ruger, I think it would be cool

Side Note: While I was looking at your pics, I couldn't help but notice you did the shootin' at RFGC. I love it down there, good group of folks.
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Old Today, 02:32 PM   #22
wrc
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What does the .308 Steyr Scout run nowadays? Is there any place you can count on to get one in a timely manner?

The righteous indignation is understandable, but those shaking your heads should remember that bikemutt can take off the bipod and switch out the scope at any time. The important thing is that he got the right rifle.
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