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Old June 23, 2014, 07:49 AM   #26
fguffey
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In the perfect world of turning screws, what is this thread about?

The driver drives the screw, problem, getting the driver to drive the screw with 100% contact, most slotted screw drivers only drive on the leading tip on each side. A better choice would have been the clutch head type screw driver. On a common screw driver in a common screw the screw is driven by the leading ends of the blades.

There are better choices with more contact than 'the blade', problem, we are too far into it to change now.

F. Guffey

http://artdepartmental.com/2009/10/27/tool-school/
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Old June 23, 2014, 08:33 AM   #27
mikemyers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stu1ritter View Post
.......I find it amazing that people don't sharpen their Phillips screwdrivers. Granted, we hardly ever see a Phillips head in gun service but they are used everywhere else. Takes about 15 seconds to regrind the bit......

I guess I'm one of the people you're talking about. I have absolutely no idea how to sharpen a Phillips head screwdriver, and didn't even know it could be done until I read this. ......my own "solution" to the problem, I get high-quality screwdrivers (Hudy, and before that, SnapOn), and they "seem" to last forever.

Now that I know it can be done, I'll check it out when I get home.
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Old June 23, 2014, 08:43 AM   #28
stu1ritter
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Mikemyers, just look at the four driving edges of the Phillips and you will see how they get rounded off. Just maintain the angle and a touch on a fine grinder and back to new you go. If the Phillips gets pointy like a Reed & Prince, just touch the tip to the grinder and flatten it a bit. All my Phillips screwdrivers are SnapOn, Stahlwille and Hazet.
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Old June 23, 2014, 08:43 AM   #29
mikemyers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drail View Post
If you cannot grind a bit to fit a slot perfectly then you need to work on basic skills before you open up a firearm and start poking around.

I find it difficult to accept that one needs to be a machinist before one attempts to simply open a gun up to clean it, but if you're right, the question of which tool to use may be irrelevant.

I also suspect many of the expert gunsmiths today got that way by "learning on the job". I don't think one can learn these things simply by reading about it. .....I'd like to ask how all of YOU learned how to do things as well as you can today? Did you take a course? Learn from a book? Learn from experience and trial-and-error?
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Old June 23, 2014, 09:39 AM   #30
stu1ritter
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Tool Tip Two.
When starting these very fine threaded gun fasteners it is always a good idea to turn the screw backwards until you feel the click of the thread falling into place before you start turning in the tightening direction. Sure keeps you from misthreading these fine fasteners. Works well for sheet metal screws also.
Stu
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Old June 23, 2014, 05:44 PM   #31
Hullraiser
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I has my first disappointment with my brand new Winchester 51 piece bit set. After dialing in a scope I got the bits out to check & snug ring screws. Hmmm. No metric hex head to fit. Went back to my non gun folding metric hex bit set. Hope I get to use the new tool soon. Otherwise I'll keep using the non gun specifics tools I've used for years without any problems
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Old June 25, 2014, 12:08 PM   #32
loose noose
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I've got a set of "Bonanza Sports" that I've had for at least 30 years. I had to do some modifying to them over the years, but they have served me well. Just recently bought a new set from Wally World but they don't have a brand name (guess whoever made them isn't too proud of them), any way they seem to have a bit for every screw made. I also have a Lyman screw driver with a bunch of assorted bits that I carry in my shooting bag, comes in handy at times.
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Old June 25, 2014, 12:50 PM   #33
cfullgraf
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I have a Brownell's screw bit set and it performs well. I guess I have been living under a rock as I had not known about Chapman. Looks like they have some interesting drivers to go along with the bits. I will probably invest.

I am never disappointed when spending good money on good tools.
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Old June 28, 2014, 02:40 PM   #34
Drail
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I started with a Chapman set many years ago and then switched to buying 1/4" hex drive bits at the hardware store to grind on. I now have at least 6 different driver handles and a drawer full of custom ground bits - and once in a while I still end up with a gun on the bench that requires me to grind a bit for its screws. The Brownells sets are probably the best - their bits are made from a carefully hardened alloy and will last forever if not abused or overtorqued. When you work on guns for a while you will build a large collection of drivers, files, and punches. At least I did. The right tool for the job is about the only way to not damage a gun (yours or someone else's) You don't need to be a machinist to grind a bit - just a good eye and steady hands and lots of practice. It's a lot like learning to sharpen a knife properly. And I know a lot of guys that can't seem to figure that out either.
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Old June 28, 2014, 09:57 PM   #35
natman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol View Post
I say this only because I know waaaaaay too many people that have absolutley no tools in their houses and don't know how to use them even if they did.
Then it's probably for the best.
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Old August 7, 2014, 12:41 AM   #36
mikemyers
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Not sure where to ask this, but I guess this is sort of about "gun tools"....

I bought a bottle of Dykem Steel Blue Layout Fluid. The purpose is to "paint" it on various parts of the moving parts of a revolver, and find where they are making contact with each other. Many of these parts would be polished during a trigger job, and it helps to know where they touch each other, so as to not waste time polishing areas that don't touch anything.

Question - what is the proper way to remove Dykem when you're done, and you don't want your parts to remain a bright blue from then on? The bottle says you can use a product called "Dykem Remover and Prep", which I guess I could order if necessary - or can I just use alcohol?

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Old August 7, 2014, 12:45 AM   #37
rcmodel
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I always used acetone or laqure thinner.
Don't think alcohol will do it, but I also don't think I probably ever tried it.

On the otherhand?
Your wifes fingernail polish remover on a cotton ball will do a bang up job too!

rc
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Old August 7, 2014, 06:22 AM   #38
Stony
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I've used alcohol for years to remove dye chem and it works just fine. In the world of real gunsmiths vs. the part timers and hobbyists, the tools will differ a lot. I've ground my own tips on screwdrivers for many years, and I think most professionals probably do the same thing. I use a Wheeler expanding wheel with a 100 grit paper on it to hollow grind the tips and if done with a light touch I don't overheat the tips. You can even grind some narrow enough to fit into the older Browning A-5 with the razor blade sized slots.
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Old August 7, 2014, 05:27 PM   #39
Drail
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Yup, those are mighty thin slots. Buy a bunch of cheap bits to practice on - you'll ruin a number of them until you get the hang of it. I know I did. Then buy some high quality ones. The whole trick to driving a screw without damaging it is to drive it down in the bottom of the slot where there is plenty of steel to back it up. Driving it by the top of the slot will tear it up.
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