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1851 navy transfer bar?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by James Felix, May 24, 2020.

  1. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    I can see putting extra locking slots in a 6-shot cylinder, if the cylinder has enough material that the slots don't dangerously weaken the chamber walls. But Howell had the overall diameter of his cylinder as a given, since it had to be the same as the original percussion cylinder. By making his conversion cylinder a 5-shot, he had enough material to mill the extra slots. He could also bore the chambers straight, rather than canted (which is required for a 6-shot conversion cylinder because of the cartridge rims).
     
  2. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Rigdon & Ansley also had 12-stop-slot cylinders. My replica on the right.

    Jim

    Contest-002.jpg
     
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  3. James Felix

    James Felix member

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    To bad they dont make pietta cylinders that do that. >_>
     
  4. mjsdwash

    mjsdwash Member

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    this won't help with a 51, but you can load all six on a 1858 Remington clone safely, if you use the safety notches.
     
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  5. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    I don't believe anyone makes them. My cylinder was a collaboration with my machinist neighbor. I have never seen any modern manufacturer to reproduce a Rigdon & Ansley or an Augusta Machine works 12-stop-slot cylinder. I believe that High Standard produced one a few decades ago as a replica revolver, but I will have to search my archives for a photo or contact another collector.
     
  6. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy

    Transfer bars require a completely redesigned hammer and trigger. The transfer bar is pushed up because it is attached to the trigger. As the hammer is cocked, the trigger rotates back, shoving the transfer bar up. This also means there has to be more trigger travel in a transfer bar equipped revolver than is normal in most single action revolvers. This is a photo of the lock work of a Ruger New Vaquero. The Transfer bar is the long thin part attached to the trigger. Notice there is a long lever arm that causes the transfer bar to rise. Nothing like the trigger in most 'regular' single action revolvers. Notice too that the hammer has a profile that prevents it from striking the frame mounted firing pin. Only when the transfer bar has been pushed up by the trigger can the transfer bar bridge the gap between the 'striking face' of the hammer and transfer the hammer blow to the frame mounted firing pin.

    poelDcnNj.jpg
     
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