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1903...Bubba'd or a beauty?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by ColtPythonElite, Jun 11, 2012.

?

Bubba's or a beauty?

Poll closed Jun 18, 2012.
  1. Bubbafied

    21 vote(s)
    22.3%
  2. Beautified

    73 vote(s)
    77.7%
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  1. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    So, what do you say?

    [​IMG]
     

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  2. postalnut25

    postalnut25 Member

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    My vote is bubbafied. I just don't like the customs made out of old military rifles. I feel that customizations erase all the history of the firearm.

    That being said, the work was nicely done. I like the figure of the wood. There was some serious time, money and effort put into that sporter.
     
  3. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Looks pretty nice, don't see many sporterized surplus with such nice wood and checkering.

    Is that a replacement barrel? If so, what caliber?
    The big old Weaver scope looks like a pretty high power fixed mag, so seems suitable for a varmint or maybe antelope rifle.

    Used to have a side mount on it.

    As far as the Bubba stuff goes, I will give it the benefit of doubt and assume it was sporterized back when it was a cheap obsolete army surplus rifle and not the Significant Historical Artifact and Valuable Collector's Item that the Internet Generation is accustomed to.
     
  4. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    That gun likely had a colorful military history...1942 issue, plus the holes appear to be for a Warner Swasey sniper scope. The possiblility of it being a above accurate piece could be why it was chosen to be sporterized. True, I probably wouldn't build one today out of a vintage rifle. However, this one was likely built in the 60's....It is still a .30-06 and appears to have the original barrel. The scope is a 10x.
     
  5. foghornl

    foghornl Member

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    Tastefully done, I don't mind custom work like that, although I do prefer un-modded Mil-Surps...and that is VERY well done

    Now if you're talking about a real Bubba job, done at the coffee table by Bubba, Jim-Bob and Dremel....yeah that bothers me
     
  6. S&W620

    S&W620 Member

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    I think it looks great, very tastefully done.
     
  7. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    I don't really like sporterized rifles unless the rifle was previously beat up horribly and has little to no historic value.
     
  8. benzy2

    benzy2 Member

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    I think it's done well for the conversion. I'm not a huge fan of most conversions but this looks done well. It's previous condition makes a big difference but I'd guess it's more useful now than previously.
     
  9. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    Beautiful rifle. Very tastefully sporterized. I like it. And you're right, that rifle was an ex-sniper. Should be extremely accurate. I'd be proud to own that piece.

    It's only taboo to newly sporterize a classic rifle because there's a dwindling supply of good-condition ones. However, I have no issues with ones that were sporterized in the past in a tasteful manner. I picked up a nicely sporterized Nazi K98 last year. While I'd never consider doing that to a historical piece, the modification was probably done in the 1950s to 1960s, when there were plenty of good machinists and gunsmiths to go around. It clearly wasn't a recent modification.

    I really just wanted a scoped large-caliber hunting rifle, and wasn't about to butcher one of my milsurps. I also couldn't afford a new one. For $250, I got a nice-looking rifle that shoots 1" groups. No complaints here.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a closeup of the work that was done on the bolt by the person who sporterized it:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. hang fire

    hang fire Member

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    If it was a battlefield pickup and beat up horribly. I would say that has more historical value than the seldom if ever fired immaculate safe queens collectors gush over.
     
  11. snakeman

    snakeman Member

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    Bubbafying ends up ugly, THIS is an improvement! Don't let the snobs get you down. It could use some irons though. The whole thing looks great. I would love to have one that good looking.
     
  12. Abel

    Abel Member

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    I really hate military rifles unless they are sporterized/bubbaized. The best ones, IMO, are the ones that employ an altered version of the original stock. The more rare and collectable, the better.
     
  13. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    Looks very nice, tastful, my vote however is contengent on when it was sporterized. there are too few '03s out there now to be cutting one up when you can buy a new gun for the same money.
     
  14. Tim the student

    Tim the student Member

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    Looks very nice...


    But I much prefer un-bubbad myself.
     
  15. nwilliams

    nwilliams Member

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    Looks nice to me.

    I'm not a fan of bubba'd guns unless the work is done well and that to me looks very professional and attractive. There are still plenty of 1903's out there that are in original historical configuration so don't fret over it and just enjoy it, I would wager it's a pretty decent shooter and that's what really matters.
     
  16. .45Guy

    .45Guy Member

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    Looks better than the poor A3 with modern rings and leapers scope that was for sale at the Medina show for $1,000... A4 indeed.
     
  17. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Beautiful piece of wood in that stock. Looks like a clean job of customizing, not at all bubbafied via hacksaw and sloppy work. Nice sporter.

    That scope looks much like the K-10 my uncle put on a Varminter setup: Bishop stock, Mauser 98 action, and a Jerry Gebby Varminter barrel (forerunner of the .22-250).

    A heckuva lot of those old custom-built rifles really put today's factory stuff to shame for fit and finish--and, quite often, tight groups. Labors of love, not just some accountant's notion of bottom line.
     
  18. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    While I would not sporterize a nice 1903 these days, I have one right now that I am working on since somebody already ruined the collector value. Plus I put myself through college many moons ago by sporterizing mil-surp rifles into what the customers of that time wanted.
    Yours was nicely done...
     
  19. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Member

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    WOW!! Beautified!

    I'd take that over a surp 03 any day! than I would buy a stock 03 surp and put em in the same cabinet together! one for plinkin the other for huntin.
     
  20. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    It was a different mind set in the 1950's and 60's. Mil-surp rifles could be bought for $15 on average, with a little skill a guy could have a very nice, custom hunting rifle for 1/4-1/3 the cost of a commercial rifle. Every hardware store in the country had 55gal drums full of mil-surps, they had little collector interest at the time. Most of the guys buying these had just spent 5 plus years carrying them in war, they wanted a cut down, light weight rifle that was different from the rest.
     
  21. Abel

    Abel Member

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    If you've ever walked fifteen miles with a full rucksack and an M249, you can really appreciate what old bubba does to a combat rifle to get her down to sporter weight. Bubba knows.
     
  22. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    Hey I can't really say much, I bought an Enfield No. 3 that had been cut down into a No. 5 a few years ago just because I was so impressed with the work. I'd rather have found an actual No. 5 in that condition but am satisfied with what I got.

    [​IMG]
     
  23. Salmoneye

    Salmoneye Member

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    I like it OP, but I just can't love a Monte Carlo stock...
     
  24. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I would love to own that rifle. A very nice piece of work. Bubba didn't have anything to do with it.

    As madcratebuilder has already pointed out, it WAS a different mind set back when all the surplus rifle sporterizing was being done whether by Bubba or someone that knew what they were doing. They were just ugly old military rifles that were a source for cheap hunting rifles. They were everywhere and dirt cheap.

    I don't have a problem with those that want to keep them original now. I do have a problem with those that condemn past generations for their actions
    then when entirely different conditions existed than what exist today.
     
  25. Buck Kramer

    Buck Kramer Member

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    I'll normally hate on anything bubbified, but this was done REALLY well.
     
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