Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1911 break in

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by wwace, Apr 14, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. wwace

    wwace Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Messages:
    99
    Location:
    Anchortown
    I have just been lucky enough to acquire two new 1911's, a loaded Springfield and a SR1911. My question is what is a good break in procedure and what's a good break in lube?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    3,329
    Load, shoot, clean as required, repeat. A properly built handgun doesn't need breaking in.
     
  3. JTQ

    JTQ Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    5,332
    Location:
    NW Florida
    I always start out shooting 230gr full metal jacket (FMJ) ammo, also known as ball ammo. The pistol was originally designed for this ammo and it feeds it the best. You don't want to start out with some odd shaped bullet profile that may cause you any problems. You want to eliminate as many possibilities for problems as you can. If it works with FMJ, you can move on to other styles.

    I always use some kind of CLP (Clean Lube Protect). I've used BreakFree, Ballistol, and currently SLIP 2000. Lots of guys use Hoppe's #9 or break cleaner or some other solvent to clean their guns, but the CLP's all work well for me and I only have to use one product. It never made sense to me to use some kind of degreaser to take off all the oil, only to have to put it back on.

    Another thing I look for in CLP's are non-toxic versions. Since they all work well, you may as well use something non-toxic and that doesn't smell bad (Ballistol does have an "odd" aroma) either. SLIP 2000 has practically no smell I can detect, and I've read good things about WeaponShield and Frog Lube, two products I'm sure I'll try at some time in the future.
     
  4. WoodchuckAssassin

    WoodchuckAssassin Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2012
    Messages:
    654
    Location:
    Lynchburg, VA
    Congrats on TWO great buys!

    Being the proud, proud owner of a Ruger 1911, I couldn’t be happier to be one of the first to reply to this message! First things first, congrats on your purchases. I’m currently saving up to buy a Springfield loaded. Be sure to post a range report as soon as possible.

    For the break in of my Ruger 1911, I first field stripped it, and applied a thin layer of FP-10 to all its parts. (I prefer to not use grease, but that’s a matter of personal preference). I took her to the range and put 200 rounds down range as quickly as I could, trying my hardest to make it fail. Pending one stovepipe, my range visit was a roaring success.

    The next part of my break in process was a detail strip of the weapon (that is to say, taking out every pin, spring, and part), and giving everything a thorough cleaning, again, with FP-10 Lubricant. Even on a high-end 1911 like the Ruger, there was still quite a bit of factory dust that needed to be removed. I polished the trigger bow, trigger channel, disconnect face, and every pin in the thing with 1000 wet/dry sandpaper. The hammer did not need to be touched, and while I did run the sear over a fine stone VERY, VERY gently to remove some slight machining marks, I don’t think this was required.

    The best thing I’ve found to break in the Ruger is simple range time. If you feel comfortable detail stripping and polishing the before mentioned parts (trigger bow, trigger channel, disconnect face, and pins…NOT the hammer and sear), then I found that to aid in the weapons feel. I also dry-fire it incessantly. I don’t think it changes anything, but it’s good practice for if/when things get ugly.

    The only qualm I had with my Ruger was that the trigger had a definite “click” before the hammer dropped. It wasn’t a creep so much as an odd, clicking movement. Did your Ruger also have this characteristic? I’d be interest to know whether mine was a fluke or not. Either way, the slight polishing I did made the trigger perfect. It still breaks at a nice 5.5 pounds – not completion worthy, but certainly good enough for home defense. Hope this helps!
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    59,082
    Location:
    Eastern KS
    Choot'm Lizabet! Choot'm!!

    Then Clean'dm an Oil'dm.

    Then Choot'm Lizabet! Choot'm!!

    rc
     
  6. BYJO4

    BYJO4 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,776
    Unless manufacturer states otherwise, I would clean it and then lube it with FP10 and /or Breakfree. I would at least shoot the first 200 to 300 rounds using 230 gr FMJ RN ammo.
     
  7. wwace

    wwace Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Messages:
    99
    Location:
    Anchortown
    What if my wife likes the smell of Hoppes #9? Lol, she really does. I have no idea how to do more than field strip a 1911 as of now. I am sure I will learn at some point. My SR1911 was a itty bit rough at first but working the action 40 or 50 times with synthetic lube smoothed it right out. My trigger is ok, I can feel just the slightest machine marks before she fires. I think that will be gone after a box or two of ammo.
     
  8. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    12,665
    Location:
    In a part of Utah that resembles Tattooine.
    I really think that 'Break-in" periods are the manufacturer's way of forcing you to try a few different combinations of ammo and magazines before you call them to complain. I have never had any discernible difference in performance in any of the new guns I have bought. (That includes Kimber.)
     
  9. stickhauler

    stickhauler Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    538
    This is the first time I've seen the Ruger 1911 called a "high-end" 1911. That title more describes custom 1911 manufacturers.
     
  10. sgb

    sgb Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2003
    Messages:
    92
    Location:
    Tallahassee Florida
    Clean, lube and shoot a couple hundred rounds. Repeat.

    If it slides grease it, rotates oil it. 1911's run best well lubed.
     
  11. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    3,329
    If it won't feed H&G 68s of the box, you have a problem. I have 1911s that have never shot anything but. If a manufacturer says shoot XXX rounds to correct a malfunction, move to a better product.

    Shoot your carry load enough to verify reliability.
     
  12. meanmrmustard

    meanmrmustard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Messages:
    4,225
    Location:
    Missouri
    +1. Jsi.
     
  13. bubbacrabb

    bubbacrabb Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    in the rain... OR
    I'd just shoot it. 1911's were designed to shoot ball ammo, so thats what I'd shoot. I dont shoot many 230 fmj anymore, I just load thousands of 230 lrn hard cast bullets. Same effect, and cheaper since I roll my own. I have the SR1911 I love mine. Great weapon, HIGH END WEAPON to me. I'm sure you'll enjoy the Loaded as well, I also have a Springfield Range Officer that I enjoy very much except for the black on black sights so a small amount of white nail polish went on the front sight on that one. On my 1911's on basic cleaning I clean with Ballistol. Its non toxic and makes my grips pretty and its good for wood so that works out well. I do a detailed cleaning breaking the entire gun down about ever 1000 rounds. I found that youtube works really good when it comes to taking a slide apart etc. Good luck, you made some good choices.
     
  14. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    45,666
    Location:
    Alabama
    As posted, clean it up, lube it, shoot it, repeat.
     
  15. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2004
    Messages:
    2,396
    Location:
    Bora Bora
    Ya ain't got no Kimber dar man, jus shoot the dern thing will ya?
     
  16. x_wrench

    x_wrench Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Messages:
    833
    Location:
    michigan
    i have always felt that any gun you are going to bet your life on, needs to have 200 rounds run thru it first. my method is to clean the gun first, to get first of all, a clean gun, but secondly, get whatever the factory uses to prevent rust off from the gun. i do not consider that lubricant. it is rust preventative. as far as lube, any light machine oil will work. you do not need anything special, and use it SPARINGLY. to much oil will only attract and hold dirt and carbon. and if you combine either of them with oil, you have a lapping compound of sorts. as far as ammo, shoot what you plan to carry, if possible. if that is to expensive for your budget, fmj's are ok. but you will need to shoot some of the ammo you plan on carrying to make certain it functions thru your gun well. personally, i would shoot 50, clean, 50 more, clean again, and then go for 100 straight. if the gun does not act up in 100 straight rounds, it is likely to never malfunction anytime you need it, as long as you keep it from getting gunked up from carrying it. and they WILL do that. you will need to clean it at least every other week, regardless if it was shot, or not.
     
  17. RickMD

    RickMD Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2011
    Messages:
    286
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Why?
     
  18. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    9,569
    Location:
    Forestburg, Texas
    So exactly what is the "rust preventative" that is being used?

    I can see your point if you were talking about cosmoline, but I don't think I have seen any pistols manufactured for the civilian market in the US that came covered in cosmoline in the last couple of decates.

    but not the light machine oil that came on the pistol?

    Oil does not attract dirt and carbon.

    Yeah, why?

    I can see oiling it every couple of weeks if you are using light machine oil that more readily dissipates than heavier oils or grease, especially while carrying during the hot summer, but I am not sure why you think the gun should be cleaned that often if it isn't dirty.

    I take it that you are not familiar with 1911s.
     
  19. gym

    gym member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2007
    Messages:
    5,903
    Those guns just shoot after cleaning
     
  20. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,365
    Welcome to The High Road Fuzzy. It is generally considered both impolite and of no help to interject off-topic subject matter into a discussion. We understand your exuberance for the Glock platform and what a momentous and infallabe achievement it heralded as the first, last and only reliable sidearm invented. BUT at present time a question has been asked pertaining to a different platform, watered down as it may be to you, so common courtesy dictates that it be answered.

    While not in video format like the awesome YouTube, a natural historian and student of the gun may find this link well worth the read: http://www.thehighroad.org/announcement.php?a=20

    Back to the OP, I can understand the sentiment that any pistol should work as delivered. I also see merit in testing reliability with a comfortable for you number of rounds. My point of contention is that if the subject were your new Lilja Match rifle barrel I think folks would be offering dozens of helpful suggestions on its care.

    I would agree it needs cleaning before being fired and a good once-over to inspect for any defects. Any responsible owner should consider the same as cracks and tailings aren't things to discover at the range. A thorough break-down and post-inspection is advised as well to check things like slide stop interaction with the lower lugs and any abnormal dust cover/frame wear. A few pictures at regular intervals can help refresh the memory along with a log for each pistol with round count, maintenance performed, spring changes and preferred loads.

    If you aren't familiar with lubrication points on the 1911 consult the owner's manual.

    Lastly, like any other firearm, don't shoot it continuously without cool-down periods.

    It takes very little effort to get more from your firearm than the average shooter does and detailed records can make just another pistol an honest family heirloom. Just my thoughts on the matter.
     
  21. joecil

    joecil Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2012
    Messages:
    782
    Location:
    Lexington, Kentucky
    I clean with Gun Scrubber or Winchester's Break Free Powder Blast followed by Hoppes #9 in the barrel. I lube the slide with Tetra Grease as well as the barrel link pin with and follow that with Break Free CLP. For a brand new gun I clean and run it a bit wetter for the first 100 or so rounds of ball ammo. Not all 1911 like all JHP ammos as some can be picky when it comes to HP's.
     
  22. mcdonl

    mcdonl Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,228
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    Those are quality guns, I dont imagine there will be any breakin period.
     
  23. Shoobee

    Shoobee member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2012
    Messages:
    244
    Location:
    California
    If the 45's have not been shot for awhile, I would definitely field strip and clean them.

    But I would not shoot them if I had others I could shoot.

    These 2 look pristine.

    Best way to keep them in mint condition is keep them clean but not shoot.

    It all depends what you plan to do with them.
     
  24. Fishbed77

    Fishbed77 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,030
    So your wife loves the smell of rotten bananas? :)

    I wish mine were more tolerant - she complains to no end when I use the stuff.
     
  25. Stevie-Ray

    Stevie-Ray Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2003
    Messages:
    4,059
    Location:
    Mitchi-gun, the Sunrise Side
    Same here, though I confess to being snooty about the stench, the older I get. I've switched over to CLP or Hoppe's Elite, whichever is available and the wife is eternally happy.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page