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1936-1938 Mauser model 98

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by .22LR-1995, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. .22LR-1995

    .22LR-1995 Member

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    D0AC96A8-CA6F-40BE-9672-E38E76DD758C.jpeg 8E879B9B-CABC-44EB-B76A-1AE38F3DE0D6.jpeg DA8F0903-BF85-42A4-833A-EC7C713A7F1D.jpeg I picked up a 1930s Mauser model 98, 8mm rifle. As I inspected the gun I realized it had tiny stamps on it, the closer I looked I realized these weren’t just any stamps.. these are stamps of Nazi/Germany, one stamp is the eagle with the swastika, the others are the Nazi eagle with numbers under them, and i almost forgot NO IMPORT STAMP ON THIS FIREARM!!
    I’m curious if anyone could possibly help me with more info about this rifle because I feel it’s one heck of a find, considering what it is
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
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  2. kcofohio
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    kcofohio Contributing Member

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    Sounds like a war trophy rifle.
     
  3. .22LR-1995

    .22LR-1995 Member

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    I’m thinking the same thing, only bad part is it doesn’t have the original stock or iron sights. Someone retrofitted the stock and ironsights to it
     
  4. kcofohio
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    kcofohio Contributing Member

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    If the stock # matches the receiver #, that really sucks. Otherwise you could provably find another stock for it. Your stock butt plate should be a milled item and not stamped, IIRC. Same with the trigger guard and magazine plate.
     
  5. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    Pull the barrel and action, look under the barrel there maybe more info there.
     
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Sold by the barge load in the 1960s and most were sporterized. This looks like a good job. Collector value is nil.
     
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  7. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    .22LR-1995

    I can remember as a little kid going into a gun shop (with my Mom), and seeing a large barrel which had a dozen or more surplus Mauser rifles in it. They were relatively cheap and I imagine most if not all of them ended up being sporterized just like yours.

    From the looks of things you've got a pretty nice one there. Let us know how it does at the range.
     
  8. Daveboone

    Daveboone Member

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    As previously mentioned, literally millions of 98s were imported, many of them sporterized. Back in the fifties well into the 80s, you were as likely to see a sporterized Mauser in the field then a Winchester or Remington. They were sold very inexpensively, and were dependable. The 8x57 is a splendid round, in a safe rifle able to be loaded to the equal of the 30-06 (the grand old 06 was designed from the 8x 57).
    I have two, one quite heavily upgraded over the years to include a new alloy magazine well with push button magazine drop, Timney trigger, a side swing 3 position safety(for use with a low mount scope), drilled and tapped with a Leupold mounted. It is as accurate as any firearm in the deer woods needs to be.
    I see yours is drilled and tapped for a scope. If you mount one, you may consider the safety modification. Any real gunsmith can easily do it, and a Timney trigger will make a world of difference in its potential. Enjoy!
     
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  9. boom boom
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    boom boom Contributing Member

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    German military parts were stamped with something called waffenamts that identify the manufacturer and sometimes even years of production and indicate German military acceptance of the part (codes changed for some manufacturers during the war). http://www.eaglerelics.com/waffenamt-codes/ WaA214 was used by several firms depending on the year

    These are generally receiver codes but some manufacturers such as Oberndorf made most if not all of their parts depending on the year of manufacture http://mauser98k.internetdsl.pl/kodyen.html

    As others indicate, that is not an original military or even duffel cut stock and is a post war, probably american stock. Prior to the 1968 GCA, importer information was not required on imports so without provenance, it is impossible to tell whether GI bringback, trophy, or simply an imported parts rifle.

    Not clear from your pictures but often trigger bows were altered (thinned, polished, whatever) of the trigger guard, triggers were replaced or jiggered with along with safeties (often to make an inferior light one stage, sometimes, unsafe trigger). These things were commonly done to emulate sporter rifles and reduce weight.

    A D&T receiver (as it appears from your pictures) is generally not a candidate for restoration without jumping through a fair number of hoops and the costs are probably prohibitive unless you want to spend $400-600 to make probably an inferior copy worth less than a Mitchell's Mauser (about $400-500). A restoration might not shoot as well as what you have already if the current setup was carefully put together.

    Numrich aka gunparts.com did have some replica k98 stocks, but then you will need a proper waffenamt barrel, handguard, buttplate, screws, barrel bands, screws, sights, etc. Real k98 stocks are now north of $200 or more and many of the cheaper ones have issues. The cost of restoration is much greater now that the imports of Eastern European war reserve stores has mostly disappeared. A mismatched parts rifle might be a hoot to shoot in a military rifle contest and if accurized (gunboards has a sticky post in their mauser section pertaining to such as russian capture Mausers) can be pretty good.

    If I would consider anything with the rifle, it would be to fully update it as a sporter if it is accurate--the stock has a gorgeous figure, replacement with either a Timney (or Bold if they are still around) trigger, and depending on how well it shoots, maybe a new barrel and finish with good glass might be in order.

    Unlike some, you do not have to go whole hog and use a grinder to obliterate the past but a tasteful acknowledgment of its military past is not impossible to preserve if you want a uniform refinish of the rifle.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
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  10. Whiterook808

    Whiterook808 Member

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    I have heard of people collecting these old sporters. You might want to search for a period-correct scope to mount on it. You might just want to preserve it as it is, for what it is.
     
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