1st .357 Loading... Now What?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by eddiememphis, Jun 26, 2021.

  1. eddiememphis

    eddiememphis Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2021
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    Denver
    I bought some used .357 brass from Maverick Reloading.
    They were very clean so I inspected, decapped and trimmed.
    Primed with CCI 550's, they are sitting, anxiously awaiting some powder.
    I have a pound of H-110 and 100 Hornady 158gr XTP's. #35750, rated up to 1400 fps.

    How much powder?

    Should I just pick a load and call it good or load different powder weights to see what works best?

    I have Hornady, Lyman, Hodgdon manuals, which vary a lot, from 13 to 17 grains.

    I am not a competitive shooter. I won't hunt with these loads. I don't have a chronograph. And I know what will be the best in the 6" revolver is unlikely to be the best in the 16" rifle.

    As usual, I am overthinking this, but want to see what you guys think.
     
  2. reloaded_in_pa
    • Contributing Member

    reloaded_in_pa Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2020
    Messages:
    301
    My notes list 14.2 for the 158xtp. I'd start at the lower load and work up. One good thing about a revolver, no slide to not cycle on a light load. A caution note for the rife....make sure the bullet clears the barrel on light loads. I had a light load not clear and luckily caught it before squeezing off another round.
     
  3. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    12,343
    Location:
    Hopewell Big Woods
  4. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    7,006
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    Start low and work up. H110/W296 requires a heavy crimp for a consistent burn. But it does not like to be down loaded, Works best at the top end. Winchester use to tell you not to reduce by more than 3% from max.
     
  5. ballman6711

    ballman6711 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2019
    Messages:
    446
    Hodgdon's data shows 15.0 - 16.7 grains for H-110 with a 158 XTP.

    I worked up from the min load and settled on 15.8gr, but your revolver may like a lower or higher charge.

    I also suggest to start low and work up.

    chris
     
  6. Seymour380

    Seymour380 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    73
    The Winchester data I have for 296 and 158 gr. Win JHP is 16.6 grs. 296, with an asterisk that says "DO NOT reduce powder charge with 296 powder. Any further reduction in powder charge or change in components can cause dangerous pressures". Source is from Loadbooks USA, Inc.
     
    Bfh_auto and doubleh like this.
  7. sparkyv

    sparkyv Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2014
    Messages:
    2,599
    Location:
    Deepinnaheartta, Texas
    You are certainly not overthinking this, eddiememphis. Listen to these guys. ^^^^^
     
    Demi-human likes this.
  8. Ru4real

    Ru4real Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2017
    Messages:
    956
    Location:
    Utah
    Load all your cases with 15.0 grains of H-110. You’ve got the right primers, and with a good roll crimp, you will have fine ammunition.

    Doing “ladder work ups” with a revolver or semi-auto pistol is not a thing. Loading all to the same, and practicing with said revolver is a thing, IMO.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2021
  9. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5,409
    Location:
    Clarkesville, GA
    H110 / W296 is pretty touchy stuff. It likes a Magnum primer and only likes a very slim loading region at the higher end. And it's always good for a light show and sun tan.

    zKBxQJ3l.jpg

    For 357M plinking or general use, I'd suggest another powder, if you have it.
    .
     
    Bfh_auto, Demi-human, AJC1 and 3 others like this.
  10. blackd24

    blackd24 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2020
    Messages:
    158
    What other powder would you suggest?
     
    GeoDudeFlorida likes this.
  11. ballman6711

    ballman6711 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2019
    Messages:
    446
    For a light plinking load I use W-231 under a 158gr jsp. Much less recoil than H-110 but just as accurate.

    chris
     
    Seymour380 and GeoDudeFlorida like this.
  12. eddiememphis

    eddiememphis Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2021
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    Denver
    Thank you for some practical advice.

    Since the loads in my manuals range from 12.7 (Hornady) to 17.0 (Lyman), you can likely see my hesitancy.

    When it comes to the advice to start low and work up, start where and work up to where? If I started at 12.7 and went to 17.0, that would be a lot of loads to keep track of and without a chronograph I doubt I would see much difference unless I went from minimum to maximum in one step.

    The advice to not load below 3% of max doesn't make sense since Hodgdon lists a range of 15.0 to 16.7. Max minus 3% is 16.2, well above the listed minimum. And to go extreme, 17 minus 3% is 16.49. The minimum listed load I have is 12.7!

    As a new handloader, I obviously don't want to mess things up- I like all my fingers in their current arrangement. With the widely varying published information I have, not to mention all the questionable loads in the internet, it can at first seem overwhelming.

    I like the advice to pick a load and learn to shoot it, rather than tune the load to the gun, especially since I am not shooting for trophies or food.

    Thanks for the input. It won't be my last stupid question, I can assure you!
     
  13. mdi

    mdi Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Messages:
    4,078
    Location:
    Orygun!
    Try this; look in your reloading manual(s) and find your bullet. Go down the powder list until you find the powder you want to use (H110/W296). Set your powder measure/scale for the listed starting load and load 12 (2 cylinders full) and test. It is not recommended to go below starting charge with these powders. If the loads are good, try more at the same charge (many times my "good magnum" loads are near the bottom of the scale). Then if you are looking for velocity, raise the powder charge .4-.5 gr and retest. Repeat until you find "The Load"...

    BTW: "stupid questions" are OK to ask as they are the easiest to answer...:rofl:
     
    GeoDudeFlorida likes this.
  14. GeoDudeFlorida

    GeoDudeFlorida Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2020
    Messages:
    3,126
    As a self-defense load, H110 has the advantage of setting your attacker on fire if you miss close enough. Even at longer ranges.
    I tried 110 and found it too touchy when loaded light and too torchy for low-light conditions. What worked best out of my RBH (6.5” bbl) with a 158gr Speer GDHP was 15.5gr according to my notes. Also says better out of the Handi-Rifle so it did clear the barrel and then some. I don’t have any velocities in my notes so it must have been between Chrony killings. :(
     
  15. Mr_Flintstone

    Mr_Flintstone Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2016
    Messages:
    976
    Location:
    Eastern KY
    I agree with using Hodgdon’s data since they are the powder manufacturer. I have loaded many 357 Magnum loads at 15 gr H110. You don’t gain much velocity in going to max (100-150 FPS depending on whether you’re loading for revolver or rifle), and your brass will thank you many times over for the reduced pressure.

    If at some point in the future you find yourself without magnum primers, and you can find it, Alliant 2400 makes a great .357 mag load with standard small pistol primers.
     
    Ru4real, GeoDudeFlorida and merlynski like this.
  16. nofendertom

    nofendertom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2019
    Messages:
    478
    Did I miss the part where you re-sized the brass ?
     
    Mel1776 and Ironicaintit like this.
  17. blackd24

    blackd24 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2020
    Messages:
    158
    H110, BE-86, Bullseye, HP-38. Which is best for 357 ‘mid range’ magnum?
     
  18. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2013
    Messages:
    6,562
    Location:
    Southern CA
    HP38 makes nice light to mid loads, if you are after hotter but not full power BE86 works well.
    H110 only does one thing well, full power loads but it does do that well.

    So for mid range magnum from your list BE86 should work well for you.
    Alliant 2018 data
    upload_2021-6-27_11-24-11.png
    upload_2021-6-27_11-24-29.png
    All charges are MAX, reduce 10% to start
     
    Demi-human and GeoDudeFlorida like this.
  19. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Messages:
    3,894
    Location:
    Memphis
    If your not using a cronograph or shooting bullseye load single load test rounds. It's just a power and safety check so .3 grain increases should test a wide range fast.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2021
    Demi-human and GeoDudeFlorida like this.
  20. dredd

    dredd Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2010
    Messages:
    413
    Location:
    DFW - Texas
    Thanks for posting this.

    I have been kicking around this EXACT same issue.
    Same Bullet, Powder, Primer & same Manuals along with a Sierra.

    The big variance in data had me concerned as well.

    I finally settled on 15.5/grs of powder last night and loaded up a dozen test rounds.

    I am going to be running them in a New Model Black Hawk & a Henry Lever Action.

    I hope to test them out early July.
     
    GeoDudeFlorida likes this.
  21. Mike44

    Mike44 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    113
    My load for HDY XTP 158 gr. , H110, CCI SPM primers, COL 1.57", Starline brass, heavy roll crimp is 16.3 gr.
    I did load workup using Hodgdon data 15.0 - 16.7. 16.3 gr. resulted in no char on the brass, good accuracy and 1224 fps from my 4.2" GP100.
    My notes say "Big Boom, Big Flash" . You should always start low and work up.

    For a much less expensive and fun to shoot target load I use MBC coated LSWC, CCI SPM primers, 6.2 gr. CFE Pistol, COL 1.61" velocity is 1014 fps from the same revolver.
     
  22. bear166

    bear166 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    Nebraska
    I'm a big fan of Universal for, well, just about everything pistol-related. For .357 plinking loads, I don't think there's a better powder out there unless one is just really determined to have a sore wrist when they're done shooting.
     
    Seymour380 likes this.
  23. Hugger-4641

    Hugger-4641 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2021
    Messages:
    724
    Location:
    West TN
    I find the Hodgdon's data is closer to real world for me. Hornady's max loads tend to be much less than Hodgdon, so I use Hodgdon data for their powder and Hornady or Lyman for the others. I will have to give Hornady credit that my chronograph results tend to be right with their data.
     
  24. Herman B

    Herman B Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2018
    Messages:
    195
    If going through the gyrations of varying loads, testing for accuracy, etc. be sure to shoot off a rest. Without it, not much reliable data.
     
  25. Ru4real

    Ru4real Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2017
    Messages:
    956
    Location:
    Utah
    Actually, I think your question was a good one. When I started I’d wonder the same “Work up from where and to where?” Gun writers have to say those things.

    I’m just some random dude that knows the loading tables and has a lot of personal experience shooting 158 grain bullets with 15 grains of H110 with Mag primers and roll crimps.

    I’ve also tried both more and less than 15 grains with no benefits either side of 15. I’ve also failed when I tried standard primers.

    In times of unlimited resources, handgun work ups using different components can be a learning experience. But these ain’t those times. You’ve got 110, run with it. Enjoy shooting!
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice